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Discussion Starter #1
I have perceived lately a darkish formation happening at the inner throat of my rifle’s barrel; just about where the rifling begins. First, I thought it was accumulated carbon fouling but as I find it impossible to remove it using Nitro solvent and a copper brush, I believe the throat is starting to erode. I haven’t seen any signs of accuracy loss though. By the way, the rifle is a 300 weatherby and I have been shooting the old weatherby/norma ammo. These are the old boxes with the picture of the bear. Believe the cartridges should be more than 30 years old. I don’t know if it is because the powder or primers at those times where much more corrosive or dirtier than today’s.

Should I expect accuracy loss soon?

Thanks in advance for your comments.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Sounds like throat wear. How many cartridges have you fired in that gun?

Also, there are better carbon solvents on the market than 10 or 20 years ago. I don't know what you can get in Peru but over here, I have been using the Gunzilla and Bore-Tech products. Much better than the old nitro solvents we used to use.

Good luck....
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your response. I’ve probably shot 80 cartridges. However, this was my grandfather’s rifle. But he used it very seldom, so it hasn’t been shot that much.
I am using Outers’ nitro solvent, and the only other alternative at local stores is Hoppe’s 9. The real issue here is finding wby. cartridges! This is why I am shooting those old boxes.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Weatherby rifles are free-bored to allow pressures to subside a bit prior to the bullet engaging the lands. A darkish coloring in this area is normal. The powders and primers used commercially 30 years ago are perfectly safe for your firearm. You can scrub until your elbows wear out and that dark area will remain. "Alligator" checking is resulting and is permanent. Happens at the throat of all high pressure firearms. If it really bothers you, a gunsmith can set the barrel back and rechamber to rid this condition, but that's sorta expensive unless it's really gross.

BTW - I have been in this game of firearms cleaning for some 65 years and still use good ol' Hoppe's #9 as a bore solvent. The foaming bore cleaners get used after the heavy crud is taken out with solvent soaked patches and then followed with the same solvent patches as final cleanup. Bore Tech and Butch's Bore Shine plus MPro 7 are on the cleaning shelf, but Hoppe's #9 and Copper Solvent get the regular useage.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Kdub,

That’s exactly where the darkish color appeared, at the area prior to the bullet engaging the lands. And that’s true about trying to clean it… It doesn’t bother me at all as far as it is a normal formation in high pressure firearms. I was worried about my barrel’s remaining life but your response has answered my questions.

Thanks,
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I doubt you'd wear it out in your lifetime. Good luck and happy hunting....
 
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