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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
11" or 12" Twist in .308?

I know this topic has been covered before, but not quite what I want to know.

I have been thinking for quite some time now that I might want to actually buy a factory rifle in a varmint/heavy barrel configuration for punching paper @ 5-600 yards and pot shots at paper at 1,000 yards. I say actually because the only "factory" rifle I own now is a 82 year old Remington, all the rest are customs. I need to take a break from building rifles, although one is being done now.


Now, I have quite a few other rifles that I have shot at these ranges and are fully capable, but they are all custom rifles and I want something that is cheaper to shoot at this range. I also don't want to burn up my expensive barrels and keep shooting my more expensive to reload calibers. I have decided that I need to buy a .308 Win. On top of being "cheaper" to shoot, it would be fun to take advantage of the seemingly endless amount of reloading data out there on this round. Also the availability of good quality factory match ammo is a plus too.

I have been looking at two rifles, the Remington SPS Varmint, and ether the Tikka T3 Varmint or Super Varmint. I owned a 700 once but never shot it and sold it off to get something else. I owned a T3 light and shot a deer with it and just loved that rifle. I know when it comes down to it that all that matters with a rifles accuracy is how it locks up and the barrel quality in general, but the tikka is just sooooo buttery smooth. I am also a fan of the nice bluing on the Tikka instead of the matte finsih on the Rem.

Now the question I really have is you guys out there with those Remingtons, I read that the SPS Varmint in .308 comes with a 12'' twist barrel, whereas the Tikka comes with an 11" twist. I was thinking that above all else it would be nice to have the option to shoot a little heavier bullet in the Tikka over the Remington. I know about the Greenhill Formula too, but I'm talking in general terms here.

What bullets do you guys that have these rifles shoot out of them, and how do they shoot?

I will most likely sometime down the road swap stocks and do some light mods, but I will shoot it in its original configuration for a while. I would like to be able to maybe shoot it for fun in a local F-class shoot if it is a shooter. Otherwise, it will just be a target puncher, varmint gun, and maybe deer, but I have other favorite deer rifles for that.
 

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This is not exactly inline with your question, but an issue to consider (especially if you need a break from customising rifles) is the stocks these rifles are fitted with. The Remington 700 SPS stock is a flimsy affair that doesn't easily allow for free floating of the barrel. I believe the Tikka stock is also somewhat flexible but the barrel is floated from the factory.

Lots of people are reporting excellent accuracy with their SPS rifles as is. But what I'm saying is, if the Remington doesn't shoot very well with the pressure points in the forend, it will be hard to change the bedding and float the barrel due to the flexibility of the stock. I was the owner of a Weatherby vanguard with similar bedding, which strung its shots vertically as the barrel warmed up.
 

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I can recommend the Tikka T3 Varmint. I have a stainless rifle in .243 and the first 5 shot group that I fired from it was under .5" and that was handloaded bulk Remington bullets.

The stock is solid and it represents good value for money.

Sorry, but I can't help you with the long distance .30 cal information except that the tighter twist couldn't hurt with the long VLD type bullets.

Regards
Snow.
 

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Both Tekka ann Savage have Tack dirvers out of the box without taking all of your money. I've shot coke cans at 600 with a 22-250 Tekka with a 32X Leapers and a barrel dampner. Did about the same with a 308 Sav 110 LE with a Nicon 16X. Load data is out there for both of them and it will only get better as you fine tune your stocks for benchrest applications.
 
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