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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I pulled the firing pin from my freshly-acquired VZ-52 and decided it must be replaced. Milsurp firing pins are available from several sources, so that's not a problem.
My question is, "is there any real advantage to be gained by purchasing a pricey titanium firing pin?
They are, believe it or not, available:
CZECH VZ52 Firing Pin
1. Quicker lock time is claimed. However, I doubt the reduced mass will reduce the lock time any appreciable amount. I'm certain that lock time is mostly time for the hammer to fall, striking the pin.
2. Would the reduced mass affect the energy of the primer strike. (Humpy alluded to this but I'm not ready at this point to have his gadget machined and I don't have any ready source for the calibrated copper indent indicators.)
3. Reduced galling and corrosion are claimed. Well, not being a metallurgist, I don't know about the compatibility of titanium with common firearms steels.

At this point, I'm more focused on cleaning the carbuncles and rust from the hole.

As always, I apologize for asking a question that's been asked before. The site's search function isn't working for me so I used Google's site: search and didn't find my answers.
 

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Carcano, seems like you said it all. The VZ is a rebounding hammer design. And the hammer and main spring control the lock time.

Only value would be IF you model is prone to break firing pines, Ti is stronger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, Harry S.!
The VZ-52 does appear to break firing pins. I purchased two via Gun Broker and both exhibited firing pin problems. One, the pin was broken off where the retaining pin goes through: an obviously poor design because it concentrates stress in that one place.
The second had a bent firing pin. That firing pin nose was bent about 5 degrees. I attempted to straighten it but ended up chipping a tiny piece off the tip. I'll replace rather than puncture primers.
The second one also has a damaged spring.
The first rifle appears to have been dry-fired excessively, breaking the pin and piening the pin that secures it in place. The second one, the pin just slid out into my hand but the retaining pin from the first had to be driven out.
(But it's a wonderful feature to be able to service the firing pin without tools!)
 

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If the stress is because the pin is hitting the While the hammer is still going forwar, I'd grind of some of the back of the pin so the retainer is only stopping the light firing pin and NOT the forward motion of the hammer. The retainer is meant to stop piercing primers, not to be a hammer stop, the slide does that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks again!
I checked the firing pin. It looks like a good firing pin will go ~0.01" (calibrated eyes!) inside the bolt before it strikes the retaining pin. (Really hard to measure without a retaining pin to actually stop it. The original firing pin was broken in half, so I don't have outer half, either: I don't know if it was over length.) However, the retaining pin was piened in its center in the same direction that the hammer drives it forward. I can only think the momentum of the firing pin was enough to bend it by being dry fired thousands of times.
The other issue is the bite taken out of the firing pin about halfway down. That bite has to be there for the retaining pin to fit through. However, it's an obvious strain concentrater. I really can't be surprised that's where the firing pin broke. No matter whether the firing pin is stopped by the primer or by the retaining pin, that's where the strain will concentrate.
 
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