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Discussion Starter #1
The question at hand is if I have a rifle that is not tube feed do I have to crimp my rounds? I would like to reuse my brass as much as possible and believe by not crimping I will extend the life of some brass. Calibers that I will be reloading are .243 .308 30-06 .358 Will performance be hurt if I do not crimp.
 

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I don't think you have to as long as your case (especially the neck) is sized correctly before seating the bullet. The bullet should not be able to be pushed in with your fingers.

Even so, I crimp most of mine (25-06, 30-06) with a light or medium crimp using the Lee factory crimp die. As long as you adjust it correctly and crimp lightly, there is very little if any case neck deformation.

If they are hunting rounds, even in a bolt feed, I think the general consensus is that they should have some crimp.
 

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Al,
The listed cartridges normally don't need a crimp. If you find the cartridges in the magazine during firing have the bullets move, then I'd suggestion a slight taper crimp.
 

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For field use I crimp everything but match loads. For practice I dont crimp unless the bullets are too loose.
A light taper crimp wont hurt, done in a separate operation.
 

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I don't crimp anything EXCEPT for the 45-70 ( which IS tube fed) 44's and 357's get just enough to make the case straight after flaring to load a cast bullet.

If your bullet is loose in the case, you need a smaller sizing button or mandrel if using collet dies.

RJ
 

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Crimp

I have never crimped a bullet except for 450 Marlin and 30-30. They had the tube magazine.

I check every bullet after reloading and have never found a loose one.

Darin
 

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I have never crimped any of the mentioned cartridges, and I have never had a bullet move. I never crimped .300 Win Mag loads either.
As mentioned, I do crimp .30-30 as it is a tubular feed magazine and the crimp is designed to prevent the bullet being pushed into the case.
 

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I dont crimp until recoil becomes stiff. As was mentioned you'll need to crimp if going into tubular magazines. I shoot 300 wby, 338 win mag, and many others and never had a bullet move. You'll need to crimp magnum revolver rounds and auto pistol rounds.
 

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'To crimp or not to crimp that is the question?"

The answer is, "Maybe. Maybe not." The only way you'll know is to try both ways, we sure don't know what your rig/load will do better with. It's unlikely you are using those cartridges in a tubular magazine rifle or a handgun so it's optional.
 

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I always put a least a light crimp on my loads, .257, .280, 30-30, 7,62Russ, 30-06, 35whelen, 44mag. I usually just neck resize and make sure the same brass goes back in the same rifle. Usually get at least 7 loads out of brass.

I do because I practice with what I hunt with and want to repeat the identical process for practice and in the field. what ever works you'll have to figure it out.

good luck
GF
 

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If you aren't loading for a tube feed rifle or a Revolver no crimp is required !
 

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I have read several articles where tests were made with rounds that were crimped versus rounds that weren't. Same loadings. In these tests, according to the articles, the crimped rounds were more accurate and had a slight velocity advantage. As pretty much all the rifle rounds I load and shoot are meant to be hunting rounds and it's just one more step in the process, I crimp.
 

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Gentlemen,
I lightly crimp all of my rifle ammunition in a seperate step with a Lee factory Crimp Die.

The reason I started was due to testing over a chronograph revealed slightly better accuracy and definitly lower Standard Deviation with a calibers tested, to include .223, 22-250, 280, 308, 30-06, 300 WSM. All testing was done on the same day, during different sessions, to eliminate temperature variances and all the components were matched. Oh, and I take a little less crimp on non-cannelured bullets, especially target bullets will no ill affect to accuracy. Salt
 

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I have read several articles where tests were made with rounds that were crimped versus rounds that weren't. Same loadings. In these tests, according to the articles, the crimped rounds were more accurate and had a slight velocity advantage. As pretty much all the rifle rounds I load and shoot are meant to be hunting rounds and it's just one more step in the process, I crimp.
I had the opposite experience, but I admit it was when I was first starting to handload.

I was loading 130 gr bullets in a 270 WIN at max published loadings. I loaded 10 or 15 shells crimped, and an equal number not crimped. I had better accuracy with the non-crimped. I attribute that to being inconsistant on setting the crimping die to the same tension each time. The sizing die pretty much gives equal tension on the bullets, even if the die is set slightly deeper or shallower. Since that time, the only thing I ever crimped was 30-30, using Lee Factory Crimp Die.

The cartridges I've loaded non-crimped with acceptable to very good accuracy are 270, 243, 260, 308, and 30-06. (All relatively mild cartridges, when you consider the gammut of cartridges out there.)
 

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I use a very light crimp. By very light, I mean no visible crimp and bringing the die down only far enough to ensure a snug grip on the bullet. If you can see the inward bend, it's too much for me.

Flash
 
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