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I think I used too big of cleaning rod and patch on my new rifle. I was getting the excess oil off. The cleaning patch was pretty tight and squeaked when I sent it down the barrel. The rod is also barely smaller than the barrel. It took some effort but not outrageously so. I went to do it again but this time it was way too tight so I stopped I little ways down the barrel. Have I ruined the barrel on my brand new gun?
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Did you get everything back out of the barrel?

If you could ruin a barrel in one pass, by hand, with a cleaning rod.... then I would say that the steel was WAY too soft to begin with.... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Did you get everything back out of the barrel?

If you could ruin a barrel in one pass, by hand, with a cleaning rod.... then I would say that the steel was WAY too soft to begin with.... ;)
Haha alright. Yeah everything came out. This rifle was so freakin pricey and nice I’m probably being way over paranoid
 

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Bore Snakes are my preferred barrel cleaning tool. Less risky, too.
 
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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Use a thinner patch.

I like bore snakes too, but only in the field. I use WipeOut foaming bore cleaner when I get home then patches.

RJ
 

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None of the above. Some of the chelating copper removing chemistry has gotten so good, I haven't used a brush in some time. I carry a pump sprayer of Bore Tech Eliminator to the range with me and pump enough into a rifle at the end of the session to run down to the muzzle. Then I plug the ends with silicone stoppers and forget about it until I get home. In most of my guns, a single wet patch at home an hour or two later gets all the fouling out. A gun that's a bad copper grabber will need some of the same makers Cu++ product or KG-12 and another hour puts and end to it.

For cast bullets, I use BT's Rimfire Blend. On guns that are lead grabbers, an hour with the No Lead product made by the Wipe Out people turns it into gray crumbly stuff that patches out.
 

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You might want to pick up a bore snake for removing excess oil . Give the snake a light oiling and pulling it through usually leaves a light film of oil .
Rods are a must but bore snakes can have their usses . I keep one lightly oiled in a plastic container just for a light pull through when putting rifle away .
Gary
 

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Theoretically, a " magilla Gorilla could use too thick a pile of material with a 'bore snake' and break the snake in the bore. Not a Good Thought. Getting such a broken snake out would be a big hassle.

Chuckling,
Chev. William
 

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Obviously too tight, to the point of being stuck, is not a fun experience,... but not destructive if removed slowly and precisely. TOO LOSE would be more of a problem, imo.

I went to "snakes" many years ago,... rarely have a need for a rod. I do wrap the brush portion with with a patch, for a cleaner/tighter fit. Just a personal quirk.

I mostly shoot cast lead, and moly coated lead & moly copper jacketed,... three passes with Ed's Red on a snake, and I am done,... been this way for years.

I'm pretty sure you didn't hurt your barre/bore!!!
 
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When you try a boresnake you soon realize the snake can't be stuck in the bore. There's always some of it outside the barrel to pull on if you need to.
I saw one that was sewed wrong and jammed in the throat, but it came right out.

When a 'snake gets dirty, put them in a sock to wash and dry. Otherwise you can tie together your laundry.
 
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I think I used too big of cleaning rod and patch on my new rifle. I was getting the excess oil off. The cleaning patch was pretty tight and squeaked when I sent it down the barrel. The rod is also barely smaller than the barrel. It took some effort but not outrageously so. I went to do it again but this time it was way too tight so I stopped I little ways down the barrel. Have I ruined the barrel on my brand new gun?
If the rod by itself will easily slide down the barrel, it is not too large. In fact, a rod that just fits the bore easily is better than one too small as it is less apt to bend and bow in the barrel during the cleaning process. The best rods are either single-piece stainless steel, coated rods, or carbon fiber rods. Throw away any jointed aluminum rods and those eyed cleaning tips. You need to make sure you are using the proper size jag for your caliber (I prefer Tipton jags), and the proper size patch.
 

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None of the above. Some of the chelating copper removing chemistry has gotten so good, I haven't used a brush in some time. I carry a pump sprayer of Bore Tech Eliminator to the range with me and pump enough into a rifle at the end of the session to run down to the muzzle. Then I plug the ends with silicone stoppers and forget about it until I get home. In most of my guns, a single wet patch at home an hour or two later gets all the fouling out. A gun that's a bad copper grabber will need some of the same makers Cu++ product or KG-12 and another hour puts and end to it.

For cast bullets, I use BT's Rimfire Blend. On guns that are lead grabbers, an hour with the No Lead product made by the Wipe Out people turns it into gray crumbly stuff that patches out.
I just bought some Bore Tech CU+2 to remove some really bad copper fouling. I started with Hoppe's #9 (wet, let soak 30 minutes, then dry patch) because that's what I had and I was still getting out copper after 18 cleaning cycles. It then took me 14 more cleaning cycles with the CU+2 to get to the point of negligible blue on the dry patch. Bore Tech recommends wet patching, then wet brushing with a nylon brush, letting sit for 3-5 minutes, then running a dry patch, and repeat as necessary. My rifle is 95 years old and has a lot of pitting in the barrel, so it had collected a lot of copper over the years.
 
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