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Like to get some thoughts about this article in Dec. Shooting Illustrated. First time I have seen this view. thanks Fay


An Official Journal Of The NRA | Why Trigger Jerk Is A Myth
I was only able to get to the section in bold before I HAD to stop. It was much to painful.
"Does the trigger finger have the strength to overpower the grip of the entire firing hand as it grips the gun?"
I thought it was an article about long guns. Handguns are much more obvious!! When you speak with someone and they will swear to you that they are not flinching or jerking or otherwise anticipating the action of the pistol during the shot, load the pistol with live rounds and a couple dummies at intervals.
They will shoot like normal until they get to a dummy or empty chamber. When they do, the muzzle will move around like crazy. Like inches !!
You get to laugh and they are taught a valuable lesson. We all do it.... what matters is to what degree do we do it.
If your shooting a 6" Python at ten yards ( 360" ) and you move your muzzle by .0625" or 0.6* your bullet impact is going to be off by 3.77". Mathematically speaking.... If you do the above test, your going to find that your muzzle is going to move around by over an inch. I'm in no way saying that my finger is over powering my entire hand.... It doesn't need to.
If you influence the gun in any way at all during the shot cycle, it will influence the bullet strike. Once the bullet is out of the tube, you can dance if you want to, it wont matter.
 

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Rob Leatham has been saying the same thing for years. (1:50 in the video).

 

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I have this on my dvr, my favorite pistol shooting video from the best pistol shooter in the world. That's at a range outside of Laramie, wishing I could have been there that day for his class.
 

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Well, glad the audio triggered me to watch the video by Rob. Said all and more than I was about to say, and probably a lot better than I could. Learned more as always listening to Rob. Prep and pull, slapping, or jerking the trigger are really not relevant to where the bullet impacts the target. What matters is where the sights are aligned when the shot breaks. Many, most, or all of the defects in firing any gun can be compensated for and you make the shot you want. Removing the defect(s) make it easier and more repeatable. Rob鈥檚 approach is brilliant because of the simplicity of the approach 鈥 Learned to pull the trigger w/o moving gun first.

Will force myself to read thru the NRA article no matter how painful. But two comments on it. Physics 101 for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. The application of 1-6 or 8 lbs of pressure on the trigger will cause the firearm to move if nothing else changes. The only question is how much. My opinion is that a jerk is far more complex the the motion of the trigger finger. Don鈥檛 believe me鈥 have a friend load a dummy round randomly in a magazine and then start shooting. Watch what happens when you pull the trigger on the dummy round. I believe the vast majority of us will see some movement, typicall down and left for right handed people and the opposite for left. The two important things are no gun movement when the trigger is pulled and sight alignment when the shot breaks. No movement keeps the gun on target and the sight alignment when shot breaks determines where the shot hit.
 

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Watching some one jerk the trigger on a unloaded or on safety rifle is hilarious. .
About 30 years ago, I went deer hunting with two friends. Sometime after lunch, they started talking about shooting. One of them hung a coke can on a limb about 25 yards away. Both shot at the can multiple times and neither of them could hit the can. I let one try my bolt action Mauser but I didn't have a cartridge in it. It was really funny to watch him when he pulled the trigger. Flinch, trigger jerk, lunging forward, etc. he did them all. I shot one time and put my round through the center of the can, but I was familiar with shooting having shot high power competition.
 

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Well, glad the audio triggered me to watch the video by Rob. Said all and more than I was about to say, and probably a lot better than I could. Learned more as always listening to Rob. Prep and pull, slapping, or jerking the trigger are really not relevant to where the bullet impacts the target. What matters is where the sights are aligned when the shot breaks. Many, most, or all of the defects in firing any gun can be compensated for and you make the shot you want. Removing the defect(s) make it easier and more repeatable. Rob鈥檚 approach is brilliant because of the simplicity of the approach 鈥 Learned to pull the trigger w/o moving gun first.

Will force myself to read thru the NRA article no matter how painful. But two comments on it. Physics 101 for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. The application of 1-6 or 8 lbs of pressure on the trigger will cause the firearm to move if nothing else changes. The only question is how much. My opinion is that a jerk is far more complex the the motion of the trigger finger. Don鈥檛 believe me鈥 have a friend load a dummy round randomly in a magazine and then start shooting. Watch what happens when you pull the trigger on the dummy round. I believe the vast majority of us will see some movement, typicall down and left for right handed people and the opposite for left. The two important things are no gun movement when the trigger is pulled and sight alignment on the target when the shot breaks. No movement keeps the gun on target and the sight alignment when shot breaks determines where the shot hit.
Well, managed to read the whole thing. Sorry I did; at least I didn't get physically, but certainly felt better before reading it.
 

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What y'all said are all factors in 'flinching', 'jerking' and anticipating the shot. Some of the remedies offered are useable to an extent? I offer this as a suggestion, with pistol shooting on my mind. Mental discipline is a must. Trigger control is a must. Light triggers don't make folks a better shot. Eliminating all trigger 'over travel' is a must. Understanding and applying how to 'break a shot' when the sights are on, is a must.

I believe, a trigger must have as little take up as possible, meaning you touch it, apply pressure and it immediately fires, no matter what the 'trigger weight' is. A six pound trigger is just as easy to shoot as a two pound one, if there is no over travel. I have demonstrated this for years, using a first gen three digit serial# Glock 17 with a 6 pound, zero over travel pull, against a Colt 1911 with a two pound pull, zero overtravel. Then I let them try it and all were astonished. They all said they liked the colt better, lol.

Sorry for being so windy...In summation: It boils down to this, you show up with your mental focus and facilities' in order, don't align the sights cross-eyed, your trigger has all over travel eliminated and you break the shot when the sights are aligned? You're going to hit every time and you're going to hit close, if not on. The 'on' will occur more often with practice.

If, I haven't offended to many folks with my drivel above, I could be inclined to write a dab more on other types of triggers and how to control them? If, there's interest?
 
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