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I'm looking at getting a new gun for the upcoming deer season this winter. I've always shot on my grandpas lever action 300 savage but now i'm wanting a gun to call my own that's chambered in 30-06. I've been thinking about getting the Remington 700 SPS DM cause its within my price range and seems like a decent gun. However I just came across the Remington 783 and I'm very curious about it. I cant seem to find much information on it though and I'm wondering how it compares to the 700 SPS. Any comments and information is greatly appreciated.
 

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Welcome to Shooters Forum, MC. :)

The 700 is the classic Remington bolt-action design. SPS is their synthetic stock version of the 700. The 783 is a whole new critter, built to compete at a lower price point with similar offerings from other companies. There was a time when Remington rifles were top-shelf products, but others have improved their guns while Remington has suffered a growing reputation for quality control problems.

Either of the rifles you are looking at might serve you very well, but for the same money a lot of folks would steer you toward other brands, these days. The Savage line of rifles tend to be VERY accurate, and for a cost-effective 30-'06, take a long look at the Marlin X7. Another good option is a used Model 700, from the late 80's or older. You can sometimes get a good deal on a great old rifle.

Good luck and let us know which way you jump. :)
 
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Before on deciding on your purchase of a Remington rifle; you might take a look at Rugers Model 77s. I don't know all that much about Remingtons Model 783, other than it is a lower priced version.
 

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There are few rifles nice as the older 700 Remingtons. Unfortunately, in my opinion, the new ones don't measure up to the same standards. I think there are better choices for the same money, and this is coming from a long time Remington fan.

Savage, Marlin X7 and Ruger Americans have a good reputations for out of the box accuracy at a reasonable price.

IF wanting to strain the budget more look at CZ, Browning, Tikka, Ruger or Winchester
 

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Of the two rifles mentioned, I'd go for the Model 700. It's been around for many years and has a solid reputation. If you're a DIY type, there are many companies that build aftermarket parts for customizing to your liking.

For me, the Model 783 just too new. First year production guns, from any maker, tend to get "improved" as the factory makes design changes to correct glitches and bugs. If needed, parts are generally not available on new model guns, the firearm must return to the factory.
 

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The Howa M-1500 can be had in a multiplicity of calibers. They come with either hard plastic stocks or grippy, over-molded stocks. Stainless or blued. No lefthanded actions. The M-1500 can be refitted with a 10-round detachable magazine for about a hundred bucks. They can be had with Nikko-Stirling scopes as part of the package. I paid something like $650 for my stainless .223Rem with 3.5-10X scope. We all know the Japanese make good cars. They make good guns, too. Look into one. You might like what you see. I really like mine...
 

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Welcome to the forum ! I agree with some of the other post, I would take a look at the Savage rifles, Marlin X7, Weatherby S2, and T/C Venture. The 783 looks like a nice rifle and has quite a few really nice features, but a first year production as has been stated is something I would hold off on.
 

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I like the 700's -- most of my rifles are 700's and they are almost all the older version. (I own nice Model 70 classics, and a nice Ruger 77, Springfields and others) If I were to buy another Remingon I would choose the 700 over the 783. However, I've had to put more work into the newer 700's to get them bedded correctly for instance and secondly I've had to polish the bore on the newer ones to get them to shoot as I expect them to. I also don't care for the finish on the new cheaper versions. The CDL and the Classic are the exception. But beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

There are other issues than accuracy and beauty. I personnaly would not have a plastic magazine box in any rifle that I owned! I feel they would be problematic. If the cartridge doesn't feed right every time from 40 below to 105 degrees then the rifle is junk and needs to go away, in my opinion. I am highly suspect of any rifle that relies on something made of plastic to feed the cartridge.

Another item is weight. Do you like a light rifle or a little heavier? Do you like the balance -- how it comes to your shoulder? How does the stock fit your face (try placing your face on the stock and then open your eyes to look through a scope). Do you have to contort your head to see through the scope. This is more than just a height issue - though height is adjustable/dependant on mounts.

Do you like a light crisp trigger and do you want to be able to adjust it. Not all the rifles are as easy to adjust as others.

For many people price is an issue. Not everyone can own a fine Dakota or Monatana rifle or other semi-custom rifle. If a $300 rifle does everything that you want, then why pay $500 or more?

I hope that I've added something, and not detracted from your decision.

Of all the rilfes mentioned I think I'd look at the Winchester Model 70 Classic, a Remington Model 700C, then I'd look at the Ruger 77 (American if cost is an issue), a Weatherby, a Savage, a Marlin, A T/C Venture, Marlin, maybe in that order.
 

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I've only used a Remington 700 one time and had an experience that turned me off on them. Perhaps it was only that specific rifle. A long time ago when I was hunting in PA I had a problem with my rifle (I don't remember the problem) and I borrowed a Remington 700 in .270 Win from a cousin to continue hunting. It was snowing heavily and when I unloaded the rifle at the end of the day, the magazine had filled with snow among the cartridges. There was a gap between the closed bolt and the magazine where the snow got in. Is that gap still there? There is no gap on an old model 722 I have.
 

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Buy the 700! The 783 is a new design/gun and is not proven/disproven yet as it isn't a year old yet.
I have new and old 700's and all shoot as well as my Savages. Some is the old ford vs chevy argument with reports of one person having problems being repeated. I am not saying that all manufacturers don't have problems occasionally but the 700 design has been around and proven.
Unless you are looking for something other than stated a stock 700sps will serve your needs.
 

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Stick with the 700, as everyone else said the first year of production guns of any manufacture are bound to have some issues/flaws, not to mention that anything you want to change or replace on the 700 will have literally dozens of aftermarket options.

I own several bolt guns of varying manufacture and several hand built rifles (one I built myself) my favorite is still my 700.
 

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The RUGER American is getting lots of good press and reports. Yes, some questions and problems but the majority is very positive.

I have one in a 30/06 just waiting in the rack for me to get out and shoot it.

Remember, in the case of the American, good glass will cost within a hundred dollars or less of the rifle price.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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Thanks for all the comments. It's nice to get some different opinions on everything.
Howa. Howa. Howa. They are what an M700 would be if Remchester had spent a few extra cents per rifle.

You know how the Japanese are: They take an idea and improve upon it to make it last longer once in use. I like the story about how the Japanese began their automobile industry. The took Dr. Edward Deming's book about mass-production and applied its principles to manufacturing. The Japanese wanted to build cars not too many years after the war. About 1955, I think it was. At the time, Detroit was making massive lead sleds that fell apart in three years so you'd go down to the dealer and buy another. "Planned Obsolescence," it was called. Deming's book said to build a high-quality, enduring product so that when it was time to replace it, the consumer would go buy another of what served him so well. The Japanese did this, and we all know how well Totyotas, Nissans and other high-end Japanese products hold up over time. Detroit took the short view for quick profit. The Japanese took the long view to satisfy the customer over years and years, and it has profited them while Detroit is in trouble.

Howa. Howa. Howa. Just go handle one. You should like it. It's intensely modeled on the M700, but with a few differences so as to avoid copyright or trademark problems...
 

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Howa + 1 times 10.
I have owned all the above.
old rem700 great but pricey.
Skip the entry level rifles. You will hate them.
Tikka great. Too pricey.
Howa is made excellent. ( . )
Michael
Missioura
 

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It is to each his or her own, and the fact is that there are a number of "entry level" rifles which are a very good product for the price.

Personal opinion is a factor here, Like I don't do Mossberg while some folk like and buy them.

I wouldn't buy one of theirs even at a higher price, and I wouldn't buy some of the newer brands out there as I don't want to be their test track.

As said earlier, Remington, sad to say, has been having issues with quality.

Worst then that is that the company which presently owns Remington had bought up a number of companies, companies with respected names, like Marlin and Thompson Center and there have been production quality issues and even in the case of TC no production.

The entry level of the bolt action Marlins was a good buy when it came out, but now ?????

Go to the gun shop and handle a bunch of different firearms. What feels good to you.

I have and have had a lot of RUGERS, I like them including the American, but it might not ring your bell. That is why there is more then one successful maker out there.

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
 

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The SPS new is $600+ while the 783 is under $400. You'll have to add optics and mounts. The best advice is to buy the best optics you can afford and the gun with whatever you have left over. That's not saying you have to buy new optics or a Swarovski scope either for the type rifle you're considering. Just don't get some "made in China" piece of junk! Leupold, made in America, is great however counterfeits are around and their website warns of getting stuck with one.

I've heard complaints on the 783 regarding quality control and the same is true to a lesser extent with a 700. But the 700 is a tested and proven design! To control costs manufacturers ship the guns the way they come from the machines with no human hands touching anything. They expect to get some back for warranty issues but figure many owners won't bother so, long run, it's cheaper. Gone are the days when guns were lovingly created and the bugs were addressed prior to shipment. That is why you'll see certain vintage rifles command high prices...........think pre-64 Winchester Model 70s or Mannlicher Schoenauers from "whenever" through the 1970s!

That said, out of the box accuracy for newer rifles with synthetic stocks can be better than custom rifles from the past, even the recent past. If I were buying a new 1st deer rifle I'd think about a Ruger American and upgrade the trigger, 308 caliber, a used Leupold scope and really good, high quality mounts. Leupold has a lifetime warranty and you can find very good scopes used and save hundreds of dollars. If it breaks, they'll fix it. Super customer service and product for the price. A fixed power will be much more economical, (like a 4x) and work fine for deer hunting. Perhaps a Weaver K4 made in El Paso would work, too.

Just my 2 cents............ BUT there is no perfect rifle so just do some homework and go for what you like. American Rifleman had an excellent comparison a few months ago with about 8 of the new, economy model, synthetic stocked rifles. Try to find that issue. Some had better accuracy and some had better triggers but overall the reviewers were impressed with what you got for the price...........sub-$400.
 

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I'm with those who suggest a used 700. One of the best rifles ever made, and hundreds (thousands?) of custom hunting or target rifles have been made with that action.

And it's not like you're looking for a hard-to-find caliber!

Alas, those who speak of the declining workmanship of newer Remington are also correct. You may get a good one, but the odds are against you.

I too like Ruger. I've had several in the past, and "back in the day," the first thing we did was take it to someone who could fix the trigger. Current production is much better, and if you're set on buying new, Ruger....or Howa....or Browning are of good quality.
 

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I'm looking at getting a new gun for the upcoming deer season this winter. I've always shot on my grandpas lever action 300 savage but now i'm wanting a gun to call my own that's chambered in 30-06. I've been thinking about getting the Remington 700 SPS DM cause its within my price range and seems like a decent gun. However I just came across the Remington 783 and I'm very curious about it. I cant seem to find much information on it though and I'm wondering how it compares to the 700 SPS. Any comments and information is greatly appreciated.
There has been a rash of Rem Woodsmasters or 742s in my area lately. Personally, I think they are decent buys especially now. If I were in the market for a 30-06, this is likely the way I'd go. Used in good condition auto loader.
Deer season is coming up faster than you realize.
 

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Count me among those who suggest you look at the Savage Axis and the Ruger American Rifle. And I have one other thing to think about. Consider the .308 Winchester instead of the .30-06. Same caliber, shorter barrel, lighter gun, a little less recoil, lots more reloading data, and only a little less downrange energy. As you get older, some of those advantages outweigh that disadvantage.
 
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