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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello from Scotland~

Im looking for your views on Tru-oil ? I believe IDshooter posted photos of a .30-30 a while back, but i cant find it !

I have found i can get this product in Britain, considering the number of man-hours im spending sand and preparation i dont want to make any mistakes.

So any experience on tru-oil and proceedure would be welcome................................

:confused:

Englander
 

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Hi, Englander:
I did my 336 so take my limited experience for what it's worth. The stock came out darker than it was before. The feel is a good balance between slick and sticky, maybe a bit on the slick side.

It doesn't seal the wood completely and I notice a bit of shrinking and swelling between winter and summer, but the humidity in my house varies greatly between winter (20%) and summer (80% if it rains).

Put a thick coat on first. Keep sloshing it on until the wood won't absorb any more. Then let it dry for a couple of days before you apply the second coat. Sand very lightly between coats and only apply a thin coat on the second & later applications. Let it dry for a day between these coats. I gave the old Marlin six coats and it looks great, with a deep but not shiny glow.

I think we have a real expert here, name of BCstocker.

Bye
Jack
 

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Englander,
Unfortunately when the server crashed in June those photos were lost. Hopefully we can get ID to repost those. He did a really nice job on that Marlin.
 

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I have used Tru Oil several times, It is a slow process but does a beautiful job. I hand rub thin coat on the stock and after allowing to dry I rub it down with 0000 steel wool, tack cloth and hand rub another coat. keep repeating this process until you reach the desired finish and luster. Good luck remember PATIENCE THIS IS NOT A RACE. :D
 

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Englander: You'll be happier with any of the oil finishes if you do the grain sealing as a separate step. I recommend a good spar varnish or spar urethane diluted by about 25% for the first couple of coats so it really penetrates the pores and grain runs. You can sand lightly with 400 grit wet or dry paper between coats. When it quits absorbing the filler revert to full consistency filler and apply it until the stock is fully coated. Now sand it back to the wood surface using wet or dry used wet. If the grain is properly filled you will see each pore plugged with the filler and slightly shiny looking. Start applying your Tru-oil at this point using either your fingers or a lint-free cloth. Apply sparingly - you don't want any sign of the oil running. Depending on your local conditions you may be able to put on a coat a day or only a coat week. It is important to let each coat dry and harden before putting on another coat. You can wet sand lightly between coats with 600 grit or finer paper if you can find it. Somewhere between the third and fifth coat you will see the finish start to glaze up on parts of the stock. If you have any large grain runs or pores that are still showing now is a good time to wet sand it using diluted Truoil as a sanding medium. Wipe the resulting slurry across the grain so that you leave any pores filled with the slurry and let that dry for a somewhat longer period. All thats left now is a bit of light sanding and several more coats to build up an even gloss finish. I am just completeing a stock and it has 14 coats of oil over a urethane seal to produce the finish I like. Some wood takes less some more. If you don't like it glossy after it is well set up you can use 0000 steel wool used with a linsed oil/diluted medium to cut back the gloss. Go gently here, you don't want to cut right through the finish. If you want a bit more gloss than this leaves you get some rottenstone, a felt pad and the same medium as a lubricant and buff it up until it suits you.

Make sure you whisker the stock before you start and use a sanding block to prevent hollows or soft grain reduction. You will need both hard blocks and flexible blocks for curved areas. Avoid rounding any edges that should be left sharp and you'll have a professional looking finish.

You can't beat a good coat of Carnauba wax from time to time as a finsh protection but if you ever danmage the finish and want to repair it you'll have to strip the wax first. luck.
 

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Great info.

Now, how do you get the original finishes off properly? (Esp. Brownings...) Have a couple projects in mind.

Regards,

Charlie
 

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CharlieZ: I have no compunctions about using chemical strippers to remove finishes. Citristrip smells nicer than most and does a good job. Circa 1851 smells bad and also does the trick. I know some fellows think it might be hard on wood but I don't really buy it. The wood is well flushed with water after using strippers and then sanded and my observation is that it really only affects the surface finish. If it does remove any natural wood oils well that's just what the new finish is providing. You can scrape it off with glass or a cabinet scraper as well but that usually makes for more work in the end. Use a wet cloth and a old clothes iron over any dents and you can raise them pretty much right back up again. Some of the Browning wood is pretty light colored and the analine dies sold by Brownells are good and so is the water based die sold under the Caseys brand name. The latter looks pretty orange initially but once the finish goes on it the color darkens. Gouges in a stock (as opposed to dents) can be sanded smooth around the edges and can be filled using clear lacquer stick to bring the area back up ti the level of the surrounding would. Epoxy resin will also work here and it's just a matter of leveling it.best.
 

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Thanks. I just stripped and old pine door with Stripeze and thought it softened the wood up, taking a bit off and rounding a lot of edges. I suppose well cared for hardwoods would stand up better.

Charlie
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Englander,

There is a lot of good information here. I can't really add much. I like Tru-Oil a lot and have done most of my revolver grips with it. I find it to be a fairly forgiving product, if you screw up, just rub it off with steel wool & go at it again.

The one suggestion that I have is you practice a bit on, say inside the barrel channel on the forend, someplace that can't be seen. That way you can get the hang of it, and figure out what it will look like on your gun, before you get started.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.
 

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I have found that Laurel Mountain Permalyn finish is much better then tru oil you can get it here:http://www.muzzleloaderbuilderssupply.com/Catalog Index.htm
If you build a small hot box with a light bulb as a heat source
your true oil type finishes will turn out better, all you want to do is heat the wood so it's very warm to the touch, after puting your tru oil on let it set in the hot box for a couple of hours let it cool, sand and repeat...........Marko
 

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Starbow: It seems we stock finishers are a fickle bunch always looking for the Holy Grail of finishes. Initially I used Lin speed, then and still occasionally Tru-oil but I principally use Pro-Custom now which is a tung oil-urethane combination.

For the ultimate seal job use your hot-box to preheat the stock and then rub on Marine type epoxy resin. It is literally sucked into the heated wood. Resand and then oil finish. Only catch is I found it to be quite wearing on checkering tools which needed frequent re-sharpening. Only my carbide power cutter didn't dull. It does an excellent job of sealing the stock but requires a bit of labor to level out the epoxy before you apply the oil over it.

Other fellows are using spray on automotive clear coat and swear by it. I believe the Biesen's are using it on their custom stocks. It is apparently very glossy and has to be surface modified if you want a satin or no-gloss finish. I don't know how you approach finish repairs if you use this as I have yet to see a stock done that way. besto.
 

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Hi guys,
I'll repost the picture of the 30-30 as soon as I get a chance. In the meantime I'll throw one more idea into the mix.
A while back I was toying with making longbows and wood arrows. But I wanted a finish that was both flexible and non-toxic to work with. I found a pretty good one - parafin wax like you use for canning. Just shave the wax onto the wood in fine little curls, then use a blow dryer to melt the wax and then "chase" it around until all the liquified wax is soaked up. It is a more waterproof finish than many of the others according to submersion tests conducted by a traditional bowhunting magazine which I have since forgotten. After it is applied you simply rub with coarse cloth to get a nice sheen.
I like the Tru-Oil very well, but I had forgotten about the old parafin wax method. My next refinishing job I just may try it! ID
 

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Discussion Starter #13
WOW !

What a response ! To date i have re-shaped and refinnished two walnut air rilfle stocks, mwith linseed only, while an improvement over the originnal factory finnish , im not completely happy with them as it seem s linseed never really dries ?

Does Tru-oil have added drying agents ?

At present i started sanding the stock of my .444ss with 320 wet/dry to get the old finish off. The obviously i shall go finer and finer.

The part im not really 100% on is removing the "hairing" ? i have been told to dip the stock in water to raise the hairs, then dry quickly and rub across the grain with very fine steel wool too cut the "hairs" ? Before sanding again.

For some reason i have noticed that many American stocks are extremly shiny like varnish ! A finnish not at all liked in Europe, we and indeed i like a less shiny oil finnish.

I shall enjoy doing this Marlin stock..........................

Englander
 

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I"ve used Tru-Oil in the past to finish some stocks and the one thing that I liked was you was able to decide if you wanted a high gloss finish or a matte finish. Some of the rifles I did in high gloss and a Remington 700 BDL in 30-06 (my deer rifle) in a more matte finish. If I remember right to get the matte finish was once you applied all the coats that you wanted you take some very, very fine steel wool and go over the stock which will cut the glare.
 

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Hi, Englander:
Tru-Oil definitely dries to a slick finish in a day or two. Of course my 20% humidity may have speeded it up. The Brownells catalogue says it's "a purified, triple-processed blend of all natural oils with the non-drying factions removed".

Sounds like you've got the right idea about "hairing" the stock. You can feel the hairs standing up after doing the wet & drying.

The finish on the Marlin isn't as glossy as the "see yourself in it" finish on recent Remingtons and Brownings. A few more coats adds gloss and a gentle rubdown like dodge describes cuts it.

Bye
Jack
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Englander,

In my experience, you can dispense with 'whiskering'/'raising the grain' of the stock with water IF the first coat of Tru-oil is wet-sanded into the wood.

Also I wouldn't dip the stock, just gently wipe it down with a damp cloth. That will do it and avoid the possibility of some water getting trapped in the grain, and later causing the finish to come off.

Yeah, watch out when you ask for advise here!! We've got plenty....
 

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Englander: Yes Tru oil, Linspeed, Pro-custom and most others include drying agents. In my climate Pro-custom dries to the touch in about 1 hour. This does not mean it has fully hardened and it should be left at least a day between coats. All of them dry with a gloss finish and the surface has to be modified to obtain a semi- gloss, satin or dead flat finish by use of very fine abrasives.

Whiskering or hairing as you refer to it is done by wetting the stock and then drying over an electric stove turned on high so it glows red. You can also use a gas flame or a very hot heat gun. Keep the stocking moving quickly to prevent scorching back and forth over the heat until it has dried. Be careful on any sharp edges of your stock such as the tang inletting as these can scorch very quickly. It doesn't take long. American walnot in particular will feel like a day old beard stubble which you then sand off. I usually do it between each stage of sanding from 320 grit on.

I would not dispense with whiskering for if you ever really do soak the stock the whiskers will likely emerge right through the finish as they are very strong fibers. I have seen it occur after several days hunting in pouring rain on our west coast. In that instance it came through a factory plastic urethane type finish. Although well sealed on the outside the inside of the stock only had spill-over amounts of finish. If you fully finish the inletting of the stock you also place a barrier against oil absorption from the metal parts.

The flat "London" oil finish you refer to is quite nice but it is one of the reasons those fine shotguns take so long to deliver. It takes a long time to do it right. I had occasion to shorten a Holland and Holland stock that passed through three generations of doctors. The last fellow was very short compared to his father and grandfather. I was absolutely amazed at the depth of penetration of that finish and had to wonder if they "tank" those stocks in heated oil for an extended period. Finished it up to match the original style with checkered wood on the butt and no plate. besto.
 

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BC,

That is fascinating, I had no idea that the whiskers could come out through the finish. I hunt in Texas and never have gotten a gun really wet. Next rifle I do I will definitely follow your procedure!
 

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Next step... How do you handle checkering? Do you tru-oil it, too, and re-cut? Or, do you avoid (tape?) checkering?

Regards,

Charlie
 

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CharlieZ : I guess you're referring to a previously checkered stock?? Some of the presently manufactured stocks almost appear to be spray finished after they're checkered which would be unlike anything the amateur or most custom stockers is likely to do. Either that or they apply the same finish to the checkering afterwards. The one I just completed today had the same amount of finish on the checkering as it did on the rest of the stock. As a result the checkering offered little improvement in grip. I used chemical stripper on it all using hot water and an old tooth brush to get it (the dissolved finish) out of the checkering. I masked out the checkered areas while refinishing the stock. Then I recut the whole pattern and borders with a single line tool to clean it up. It really didn't take that long to do the latter. Over the next few days I will apply light coats of diluted Pro-custom on the checkered area. I'll let it soak in each time and brush out any excess with the tooth brush and let it dry. The last coat will be full strength but will also have any removed that doesn't penetrate in the first 15 minutes or so. The object is to get enough soaked in to protect the wood from moisture but not let it build up to the point that it starts to fill the lines.

When I lived on Vanc. Island and hunted there I left a couple of rifles uncheckered for use in the nastiest weather. It always seemed to me that the checkered areas were the weakest link in sealing the stock against moisture. First you do every thing you can to seal it up and then you cut it full of grooves sort of thing. Trouble is, those rifles always looked like a work in progress. Thus I have a stock that took forty years to complete as I finally got around to checkering it about 2 years ago. The wood never warped in all that time and I suspect it has more to do with being a great piece of wood than not having checkered it. That stock has been completely refinished 4 times to date and it is the second stock on the rifle. It's a pre-64 Mod.70 with original chrome moly barrel and still shoots wonderfully despite the conditions it's been through. I just never let it sit left wet and the bore and surface metal is still very good. I'm afraid as a result I'm still suspect of that new fangled stainless steel. I made my living carrying it and made sure it was cared for. Have you ever noticed some of the worst bores and gun metal you see are the result of seldom users not caring for them? besto
 
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