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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 223 53 grain V Max loaded and Hornady say's at 500 yards it will drop
35.6 inches (not sure what my load will, just trying to figure this out).
Chart I read said at 500 yards 1 mill is 18 inches, if I held 2 mill high
would I be aproximately at 36 inches at impact, if my load will be
what Hornady say's?
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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3.6 X distance in yards (500) ÷ 100 = 18 inches at 500 yards, so yes, 2 MIL is 36"

RJ
 
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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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I have a 223 53 grain V Max loaded and Hornady say's at 500 yards it will drop
35.6 inches (not sure what my load will, just trying to figure this out).
Chart I read said at 500 yards 1 mill is 18 inches, if I held 2 mill high
would I be aproximately at 36 inches at impact, if my load will be
what Hornady say's?
It depends.

If you are looking for a mathematical answer, then yes. If you are looking for what happens in reality, then you need to go shooting and find out.

You didn't specify say, so I'll assume you are looking at a drop chart of some sort. Typically those are based on a specific set of atmospheric conditions and elevation. It also usually assumes the quoted G1 BC, from the marketing dept. Hornady never tells you what velocity that is based upon, and since G1 has differences based upon velocity; it's not an unimportant footnote. Many times the claimed G1 will only maybe barely, or never at all be possible, from the cartridge you are firing.

So, you need to go out in your conditions, with your rifles velocity, and verify things. A quality ballistic app, can do wonders for getting really close. Personally I use Shooter, by Sean Kennedy, but there are several quality apps such as Hornady's 4DOF.

Cheers
 
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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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I use Hornady's 4DOF to "get close" and it's usually really close but the truth is in the shooting. Those Vmax's even though they are shaped like a bumble bee fly really well.

RJ
 
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You need to find out the muzzle velocity of your load and calculate a trajectory in mils and meters , forget inches and yards it makes it easier . Or shoot the load to establish the drops .
 

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Generally bullet drop is calculated from the muzzle angle. It has a relation to target impact but it has little to do with line of sight. If you are sighted in at 100 yards then it is likely that you will have less than 36 inches of drop relative to that point. You would have to know how much your bullet has dropped from its initial path at 100 yards and you would have to know the angle of flight at 100 yards. A decent ballistics program will provide a ballistic path as well as over all drop from the muzzle angle.
There is a free to use basic ballistics program for Microsoft OS at Huntingnut.com called "Point Blank". It is a basic three degree of freedom platform that may better answer your question. No software will give you exact points of impact but they will get you in the ball park.
 

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Total bullet drop is simply how far gravity will make a bullet fall during the time it takes the bullet to go from the muzzle to the target. Bullet drop with respect to a particular sight zero is just how far the bullet will impact above or below your point of aim when you shoot at a range closer to or further from your zero range without making a sight adjustment. It is just the difference in the total drops at your target and zero ranges.

For flat-fire shooting (unless you are trying to shoot 1000 yards with .45 hardball), the difference in a straight line to the target and one to a point one total drop directly above the target is small. For example, for a 0.264" 142-grain SMK fired at 2800 fps, at 1000 yards the difference in the two straight lines is just 1 foot 8 inches. That's so short it only introduces about 0.011 MOAs of additional drop at that range. It's smaller than any sight adjustment you can practically make.

Wind alters that drop some by the mechanism of aerodynamic jump, but in still air, the above will hold true.

I infer from the OP's question that he is using a mildot sight and wants to know where to put the sight. That can be found as RJ described. It is the difference in the angle the rifle needs to point the bore line at the total drop height above the target.
 
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