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Hey y’all, looking for some help and info regarding a Mauser 98 NON sportster in 30-06. I’ve been told that all serials match and it’s all original. Has iron sights. I’ll attempt to add a pic to this as well. Im more or less looking for a value of the rifle. I asked the dude how much he wants and he didn’t tell me a number but told me there’s one other offer. Based on me and him talking, I don’t think he knows too much about the rifle and doesn’t want to accept something too low. Any and all help is appreciated!!
100373
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Top of receiver ring, and left side would help.

Most military mausers were something besides .30-06. Is there an import stamp on the bottom of the barrel, below the front sight?
 

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Top of receiver ring, and left side would help.

Most military mausers were something besides .30-06. Is there an import stamp on the bottom of the barrel, below the front sight?
I just asked him for it, I’ll update when the info and pics are received. Thank yall
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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That's a refurb Yugo. And the caliber stamp is 8x57, not .30-06. Plenty of those floating around. If the barrel was halfway decent, maybe a couple hundred bucks.

I bought a couple years ago from SARCO with rotten barrels, sold the stocks for pretty much what I had in the guns, and one is now a .250 Savage, and the other an actual .30-06.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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And before I believe that the "numbers all matched," I'd want to see pics of all the numbers. Anything electro-pencil, is not 'matching.'
 

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8x57 isnt 3006

o_O
 

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quick google search shows about $500 starting point for a matching number decent condition rifle goes up with certain desirable characteristics. i bought mine (Brazilian 3006)at a gun show years ago for 150 and spent a good amount turning it into a 35 whelan. it was a fun project, lots of parts and upgrades readily available. i had a new barrel installed and had it drilled and tapped then did rest at home. cost is what you pay, value is what you get, i got quite a bit of value
 

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That is not a particularly desirable M-98. From your description, it could have been a 1950 FN or converted 1935 Colombian or 1924 Venezuelan, but what you have is a late (or after) War 8x57 which means the cheapest of the K-98s. I'd offer him fifty bucks and see what happens.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Forgot I had one more of these around the place......

Here is the key: The markings on the left side of the receiver ring are the Yugo arsenal that refurbished your gun after WWII. Mine says PREDUZECE44 which identifies the arsenal. The original (german) mark on the top of the receiver that would have identified the arsenal that made it with a three-letter code and the year is gone, so you don't have any idea what year it was made, or where. Eg. something like "BYF" and a two digit letter code would have been on it.

Make SURE that the bolt numbers are STAMPED not done with electro pencil, if you want to be satisfied that it is 'matching.' The Yugo arsenals were not real particular about keeping parts together from the same gun, so it is .... unlikley. Even then, the Yugo arsenal could have re-stamped the serial number. There would typically be two-digit markings on other parts, such as the trigger, that should match the last two digits of the serial number, but as the war went on, all the little parts may not have been marked.

The bolt and extractor have been blued, and I don't think that's "original" any more than taking your pristine 1960s sports car down to the cheapest body shop in town and having it re-sprayed keeps it "original," not to the collector anyway.

If the bore is good and the headspace is OK then you can fire off a few rounds to scratch that itch, if you have it.

The importer's stamp on the bottom of the barrel means it came into the U.S. post 1968, not a war bring back.

Anyway it is a relic of WWII so it's worth something. There were a crapload of these imported in the 1990s, and at the time, pretty cheap.
 

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Doubt all the numbers match but if the bore is decent I'd go $250-$300 for it. In this climate? No idea what someone would give for it but as others have mentioned don't shoot 30-06 in it. That action would make a nice base for a different rifle if you were thinking of trying that. I've got a nice FN Mauser in 30-06 I'm going to use for a 35 Whelen or something or other.
As MikeG mentioned there were indeed a bunch of these imported and I got a couple for about $70. Those were the days
 

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Hi Drew:
It's all there.
This means that if you decide to buy it, you have a choice of what to do with it. Providing it is in good condition; good barrel, good bolt face, good headspace, good bedding, tight screws etc., you can leave it as 8X57, which is a very good hunting round for medium to large game. Good ammo is available as are handloading components.

Or, you can break it down, and sell off the stock and stock parts to finance the purchase of a pre-threaded and pre-chambered new barrel you can often find for under $200 on E-bay or directly from other barrel makers. The better the barrel, the more expensive they are, from $150 to $700, The barrel will have to be headspaced by a gunsmith, and the receiver will have to be tapped for scope. Bolt handle will have to be heated and bent down too, a job requiring skills. Then, a choice of stock, from laminated wood or fiberglass or synthetic, mounts, scope and sling.

Now, you can go out and purchase a new commercial rifle, probably cheaper than building your own from this 98, but some brave souls get great pleasure from building their own fine rifle. Still, the 98 Mauser is the "original" bolt action rifle, and it has the strength to fire nearly all centerfire cartridges. Aside from having a single stack magazine which is slicker operating, it is equal to or stronger than most commercial actions nowadays. It has military reliablity, and is as good or better than other military bolt rifles. Hundreds of thousands of fine rifles have been built on the 98 action. Top English gun makers and Mauser itself still builds fine 98s that most of us could not afford to even handle, much less purchase.

Look through gun auction websites to get an idea of what might be a fair price to pay for this 98, which has somewhat less collector value than other 98s.

Not to frighten you, but nowadays, with high prices for all guns and gun parts, some 98 Mauser bolts are selling for $300 bucks or more, which is more than people paid for entire 98s a year ago.
Mauser just came out with a new, super fine rich buyer, top-of-the-line Model 98, the first since WWII. MSRP is in five figures ranges.
 

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Drew,
Welcome to the Forum. These folks have given good advice regarding the rifle. It is a relic from WWII and they used to be available for not much money. If you like it and can get it cheap, go for it. I have a few of these reworked Model 98 rifles in my collection, but have not put much money into them. All the best...
Gil
 
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