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I went out shooting today with my Ruger Bisley 45 Colt 6-gun. I was shooting the Cast Performance 335 with H110. 22.2 grains gave me 1160 fps, 23.0 gave 1230, 23.5 gave 1250 and 24.0 gave 1280 fps. It seems that my gun requires a lot of powder to get the velocity. I noticed in load swap that another fellow (powderstuffer) listed a load of 19.0 grains of 296 with the BT 340 in Starline brass with a WLP primer for a velocity of 1058 fps. Well I tried that bullet with the same case and primer but with 21.0 grains of H110 and got 1050 fps. He got 8 fps more velocity with 2 grains less powder (I have been told that H110 and 296 are identical). Is it likely that a lot to lot difference could account for 2 grains more powder required to achieve the same velocity or is it more likely that his gun is tighter in bc gap and so less of the powders gasses are wasted? With my current load using the CP 335 and 24.0 grains of H110 to get 1280 fps I do not know if I am overboard. Cases came out just fine and the velocity had not flatlined. Thanks for any input, Brian C.
 

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Brian,

Your velocities seem to be much more realistic than the last time that I replied to you.  The Chronograph must be behaving itself better!:biggrin:

Now, concerning your revolver and the velocity descrepencies betweeen other data and your particular sixgun.  Perhaps differences in lots of powder could come to play, but not with that wide a variation.  My suspicions lie in the barrel to cylinder gap on your revolver.  Have you measured it?  I would wager to beleive that your BC gap is probably in the .006"-.008" range with that stock Bisley revolver.  Not knocking your gun, as most Ruger's come with generous BC gaps!  This wide barrel to cylinder gap can account for up to 250 fps difference in velocity when compared to a gun set up with minimum BC gap tolerances!  Too, this can raise hob with your ES and SD figures with the chronograph when working up loads.  

Brian, please remember that each gun has a personality of its own, if you will, for lack of better terminology to describe the individuality we encounter with guns of the same make and model in regard to their likes and dislikes of load combinations and the performance gleaned from these loads.  Yep, it certainly can be frustrating at times, but yet rewarding once the right combinations are found!

Why else do you think all handloaders are eventually bald?

Let us know what you find!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Marshall, thanks for the reply. You are right (no surprise there) about the bc gap. It is at 0.007". I did talk to John Linebaugh and he said I should be fine at the 24.0 grain charge with the CP 335 but not to go any higher. I am at maximum but still okay he thought. He said he uses that charge regularly with a 325 cast bullet. I would like to know what you think about my idea of loading the bullet longer and crimping with a Lee Factory Crimp Die. That way I could get the same velocity but at lower pressure. Is there any reason not to do this? Also I would love to get some more of your 345 grain bullets as they are already set up to be seated out longer. I shot 4 groups with them recently at 50 yards using my bench, bags and 2x scope. The average group size was 2.6" with the largest group being 2.9". I was using 23.5 grains of Lil'gun for a velocity of about 1200 fps (chrono was acting up that day also). Anyway how long before I could get more of those excellent bullets. I think that is the bullet for me! Thanks, Brian Carlson.
 

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Brian,

Glad to hear that you like those 345g WLNGC bullets.  They are very efficient and accurate in most guns, as you have found.  Sorry to say, that our backlog of orders is getting longer, and not shorter!  looks like about sixteen weeks right now!  Sorry for that, but if I made them fast enough to keep up with demand, you wouldn't want them anyhow, as my quality wouldn't be there.

You can use the factory crimp die to lenthen the COL as you have outlined, but I do beleive that you'll be disappointed, as the factory crimp die will be really weakening the driving band by crushing the case into it, and in most cases is detrimental to accuracy due to this weakening of the driving band rearward of the crimp groove.

If you do try this, let us know what you find out!

God Bless,

Marshall
 

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"Why else do you think all handloaders are eventually bald?"

Oh...that's just great...now you tell me!  :biggrin:
 
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