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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I finally built my dream 10/22 with all Volquartsen parts including the barrel, bolt and trigger group. The receiver is OEM. Took it to the range and it shot CCI mini mags beautifully but it did not like the Remington Gold bulk stuff at all…lots of FTF’s and stovepipes. Wondering if this typical with Volquartsen?
 

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When it comes to 22 LR guns can be finicky. My particular gun seems to like the Gold stuff. You can take 2 identical guns and one will like brand x and the other won't. Try another brand until you find one the gun likes.
 

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You picked one of the worst brands of ammo to use in your gun. It’s sticky with excess lube on it and it builds up in the chamber area rather quickly. Very few, if any, serious/successful competition shooters use Rem ammo. Most of it looks like it was dropped in a bucket and then the wax was poured on top. Get some better ammo to try. Mini mags cycle pretty good and are on again/ off again as far as accuracy goes. One case will shoot great and the next one is spotty. If you’re trying to build a target gun, use target ammo. There are a few pretty good brands of ammo that aren’t expensive you can try. One that consistently works for me is Norma-Tad. Another one is Aguila. For intro/ammo they both shoot well. The better, more accurate brands are lubed with what feels like an oil as opposed to a wax. Get a chamber brush and spend some time cleaning the chamber out. Lube build up makes for sticky extraction and also causes failure to feed into the chamber.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Yup, ditch the bulk ammo for a target gun. It might work OK with the original barrel, but that's not what you put the gun together for.
 

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Since 22 bullets are lubed inside the case, its' easy to relieve them of the excess lube by rolling in a towel damp with acetone. That cuts oil and wax and leaves them clean and fresh. The bullet lube is still there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yup, you’re right MikeG
Wood Door Grey Trigger Gun barrel

Since 22 bullets are lubed inside the case, its' easy to relieve them of the excess lube by rolling in a towel damp with acetone. That cuts oil and wax and leaves them clean and fresh. The bullet lube is still there.
Huh, never tried that before…so I assume this will reduce residue in the chamber to minimize jamming etc?
 

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It helps with reliability in .22 target pistols, but I just cleaned the ones I was about to shoot.
 
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Lots of people use custom 10-22's in NRL22, at the local level matches CCI standard velocity is popular, I shoot it in my custom AR, it'll digest a couple of hundred rounds before wanting to be cleaned.
 

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Can anyone tell me if the new VQ bolt needs a break-in period? Should I have lubed it before installing it?
No and No. I can’t even begin to tell you how many people buy Ruger 10/22’s and immediately start to “improve them”, “make them better”, “modify”, etc, etc, etc. Problem is, they’re mostly fixing what isn’t broke. You rarely see a post where anyone is complaining that their stock 10/22 isn’t functioning right. If they do post it, simply keeping it clean usually solves the problem. When you start drinking the CoolAid about buying a ton of parts to make it better the troubles often begin. There are a lot of companies out there who promote and sell aftermarket parts to make your gun a super tack driver that will miraculously shoot top match grade scores. Some parts actually are very good and some aren’t. If you’re not familiar with how these guns function and have some experience working with them and shooting them, you’re vulnerable to having problems. Working on these guns sounds like an experiment using Lago parts. It just doesn’t always work out. My suggestion is to start with a barrel of good quality and see where you go from there. That’s usually about 90% of all the real improvement you’ll ever get no matter how many other parts you add. If you need to one more thing, get a trigger job or buy a QUALITY aftermarket trigger to put in. If your gun starts acting up take it back out. In the end, it’s all about performance, not what latest fad parts you have in your gun. One more thing…..ammo is everything in these guns. You need to find a good quality standard velocity ammo to use in your gun and stick with it. They are really particular what brand and type you feed to get the best results. KEEP THE CHAMBER CLEAN ALL THE TIME. Buy more than one mag (get several) and see which ones work. They need cleaned and adjusted once in a while also.
 

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The Shadow (Moderator)
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Nothing made properly, needs a "break-in period",
When something needs used to machine clearance from an I'll fitment, that's the definition of "break in".

Everything should be lubricated. The correct amount of oil, wouldn't cause an off taste in your glass of scotch.

Cheers
 
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Blow-back action work on two things--the mass of the bolt and the strength of the bolt return spring. Both are equally important to operation.
How 'Straight, Solid and Square' the bolt face is when it fires greatly affects accuracy. (Explains the M'03 and 63's great reputation).
Changing ammo changes the amount of energy available to the bolt and return spring. "Tuning" involves correcting errors. "Throwing money at it" might help but it might not.
 

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I always thought/believed that bolts that floated around in the receiver were potentially less accurate, due to the inconsistency of the firing pin striking the cartridge in the chamber? I may be wrong? But, very much agree with Mr. Belk, above.
 

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You are correct. One of the things unsaid or over-looked or ignored about 10-22s is the fit of the extractor to the extractor slot. What REALLY helps a 10-22 is to add another 'extractor/guide' on the other side of the bolt. The easiest way to do that is make another bolt from scratch. The aftermarket guys haven't gotten to that yet.
One of the most naturally accurate (by design) 22 ever made was never made as or into a target rifle, but the design is used a lot....the Browning T Bolt.

"Break-in" involves engines that needs the Babbitt bearings to gradually wear to fit the crank shaft. The process of SO many parts rubbing together for the first time dirties the oil, so a quick oil change is needed to get rid of the 'break-in' debris. NONE of it applies to firearms of any kind. Shoot and enjoy!
 
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I've used Volquartsen parts in my 10-22s and MK pistols for over 40 years with no issues. Every 22 firearm tends to like one kind of ammo over others. Mine love the CCI MiniMags at 50 yards my 10-22 will put 50 rounds into the size of a half dollar and that is with the vplquartsen carbon wrapped barrel
 

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Sometimes it totally depends on the batch of ammo you get too. I’ve had several thousand Remington bulk yellow bullets that have been more consistent then just about all the other bulk stuff I’ve tried. I’m not saying it’s better then the high end target stuff but it’s definitely holding its own in the plinking ammo. Guess I got some good batches.
 
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