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Discussion Starter #1
Good afternoon all,

I have a recently acquired VZ 24 sporterized by Kimber chambered in 270 Winchester. The flip up safety is pretty loose and I was hoping for some suggestions on solutions. The safety flips up fine, locks great, and in the safe position is wiggle free but when the safety is off it is rather... jiggly. There is a bolt attaching the safety lever to the bolt shroud and it is tightened down all the way. Any thoughts?

While we're here, anyone throw an aftermarket trigger in a large ring Mauser? What did you use? How do you like it? It has a trigger like a staple gun and I'd like to rectify that situation.

Thanks,
Josh
 

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Josh-- You have an aftermarket saftey but I don't know what kind. The 'jiggly' at the bottom is a bad fit to the cocking piece or a missing friction plug in the shaft of the safety (Williams type).

Aftermarket triggers were INVENTED to install in Model 98 Mausers. Pick one!
 

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AS to the trigger, Recknaggle, Timney, and some others all work, for a hunting rifle a Timney is the least expensive and they work just fine.. The Recknaggle is expensive but the two Ive used came unadjusted the stickum they use is red locktite it appears, and didn't hold?? fixed it and put a dab of glass on it..if I ever want to change it Ill heat it with a kitchen butane cooking torch witht he tiny flame..Never had a problem with a Timney. The old Blackburns were my favortite hunting trigger..
 

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Blackburn triggers are still being built and sold by Swift Bullet Co. The Blackburn is a copy of the Canjar 'Improved'. They're hard to beat for a M-98 trigger.
 

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The safety sounds like it might be a Beauhler? Hard to tell without a picture.
IIRC, the Beauhler had a small flat spring on the underside - if that spring was missing, I expect there'd be some slop in the leaf movement.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Does this help?

Thanks for the trigger recommendation, I'll look into it. I was looking at a Timney Featherweight or one of the Dressel Winchester Model 70 style triggers. Here are a few pictures of the Gunbroker listing. If you need more I can certainly try and get my computer and camera to talk to each other sweetly, but technology has never been my strong point haha.
 

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It's a military shroud with a Williams safety. It should have a tiny rod of nylon in the shaft that keeps it from rattling.

To take it out--

Take the bolt out of the rifle and hook the cocking piece on something strong and not an heirloom (!!) Pull back hard enough for the cocking piece to clear the back of the shroud enough to slip a coin under it to keep it back. Depress the shroud lock pin inward and unscrew the entire shroud and firing pin.
Stick the firing pin into a block of wood and press down HARD on the shroud until the cocking piece goes back far enough for the front end to clear the back of the shroud and rotate the cocking piece 90 degrees and pull it straight off the firing pin. Relax the shroud and slip it off the firing pin. The safety wall fall out.
The safety shaft should have a tiny cross hole. Put a piece of toothpick in it and re-assemble in reverse order.

Don't do it on antique furniture or under an expensive chandelier. :)

I have half a dozen bolts here if you need a photo sequence. Very easy and no tools required. That metal disk in the side of Mauser stocks with the hole in the middle is for the firing pin nose for disassembly. Think of the millions of ignorant infantrymen that learned how. You can too. ;)

With the military safety, it's put in the center position as a substitute for the coin. ;) The aftermarket safety is only ON and OFF with no center safe position.
 
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I was editing while you were typing.

There are many after-market safeties that operate the same way. FN had the first one in 1951. They are on the left side of the shroud and flip up next to the scope. Lyman had one and Bueler and Stith and some copies, too.

That little leaf near the rear should be springy enough to rub fairly hard on the rind of the safety opening. You can gently bend it to give it more spring when you take it out.
 
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