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I'm new here and although I did some shooting as a kid (years ago) I don't know a lot about guns. Recently I purchased a Walther P22 that fires long rifle standard and High velocity rim fire shells to start with. What do you think of this as a target gun to get in a lot of practice without the high cost? I would like to eventually go to a hand gun with more punch and am thinking of a 9mm but I'm not sure if my wife could handle the kick of it. I've never fired one so I don't know how it compares. My wife is interested in learning how to shoot also. She's tall but thin and has large enough hands to fit around just about any hand gun. I'm just concerned about the strength in her arms/wrist, etc. and if she could handle the kick back. Any recommendations.
 

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Welcome to the Forum

Glad to see you here. There are a lot of knowledgeable folks on this site that will be willing to assist you. Tour Walther should be just fine for informal target practice, if you can find .22 l.r. ammo. It may be helpful to get some formal instruction for yourself and your wife to get familiar with various handguns. All the best...
Gil
 

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Welcome to Shooters Forum, Larbear. :)

I've got a Walther P22 and you'd be hard-pressed to find a better handgun to learn with. My wife liked it so much I bought a PK380, which is essentially the same gun in the modestly more powerful 380ACP round. She likes the 380 better than 9mm, particularly when comparing full-power loads for both.
 

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The walther is ok for plinking, but isn't accurate enough, and has a poor trigger, for target. The Ruger auto in the same general price range is a better starting gun.

Gil is right on, get some one that knows how to shoot to give you a shooting lesson or two. Also a safety lesson is a good idea.

If target or plinking is your interest, you might just want to stay with the 22 rimfire, nothing will shoot more accurate for you...and it is cheap to shoot all day.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the tips. I know how to handle firearms. I qualified as expert in the Army and shot a long barrel 22 single shot at Gophers as a kid from the roof of our barn. It only had an open sight but it was really accurate. Now I just want to shoot but not interested in killing any animals. I just don't know all the new guns and ammo out there now. So that's what I meant when I said I don't know much about guns. Thank you for the help.
 

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BECAUSE OF ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES, SEMI-AUTO PISTOLS ARE DANGEROUS. Semi auto 22 pistols are certainly high if not the highest in accidential discharge.
 

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imho, A full sized 9 mm (say 5-6") will not be much of a step recoil wise over a poly 4" P22.
I own and shoot both, and there is a VERY noticeable difference in recoil between the two. This is especially true for ladies or young shooters. Objectively, the difference is there, but it just doesn't bother most adult male shooters.
 

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Recoil depends on your perspective. I often shoot deer slugs from a 12 gauge at paper targets. After doing that, both a buddy's compact 9mm glock and my heritage rough rider .22 revolver feel like toys with little recoil. If I start on the .22, and move up to the 9mm, it feels more substantial. I have also shot a full sized glock in .40 and I find it to be very comparable to the 9mm.

I wanted a .22 to get into it too, and I really looked at the Walther P22 and the Ruger SR22 before I bought the Heritage Revolver and have heard good things about both. I really like the look of them both. The only complaint I have read about semi auto .22 is that they can be finicky for ammo. If yours isn't or you found the ammo that works, I am sure it will be fine.

Around here (Iowa) there isn't a place that will rent you a gun to try out (I guess insurance is preventatively high for that kind of thing), so you have to handle it in the store and take your chances. I read a lot on a lot of sites before I made a purchase. The best way to get an idea for what you like is find a buddy that has one and borrow it.

For 9mm, personally I like the Beretta 92 and the Ruger P95 more than a Glock, which is what most guys will try to sell you on. I also would love to own a Browning Hi Power in my lifetime but I don't think my budget will be in line with that until I retire. Its just a matter of what you like and what feels comfortable in your hand.

Picking out a gun for my wife because she wants one is like a dream for me. She isn't very excited about guns. Consider yourself lucky that way.
 

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Lots of opinions here. My wife started with a P22, I picked it because it had target sights and a long enough bbl for fun plinking and shooting. It was unreliable and/or terribly fussy about brand of ammo, sold it and moved to a snubbie 38, even with very light loads it snapped too much for my wife so she wouldn't shoot it much or often. Then she picked up a Sig P238 (380ACP) and now she shoots a lot, she's added a Sig 1911-22 which she loves a lot. Everybody is different, but the one thing I recommend is to go with her to a handgun basics class, and then a self defense class. Whether these are part of getting a permit to carry or not. You cannot get enough training or background for use of a handgun in today's world. And if you don't practice with it as you plan to use it.....well, enough preaching, I know women that shoot 44 mags and love them and some that can handle a 22 but little else, you have to find what's right. Generally with experience and shooting, larger calibers are more easily handled.
Good luck
 

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BECAUSE OF ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES, SEMI-AUTO PISTOLS ARE DANGEROUS. Semi auto 22 pistols are certainly high if not the highest in accidential discharge.
Looking at this somewhat dated thread, I often wonder why so many people think a rimfire auto rifle or handgun is a good place to start a shooter off. :confused:

I recall a time when a single shot .22 bolt gun was almost universal as a starting point for firearms, and nobody considered a repeater for a 8-10 year old. My girls started with a Chipmunk and CCI CB's. I had to cock the bolt for 'em. They didn't mind. When they wanted to shoot a handgun, I brought out the Bearcat.

I've watched a number of starters with a auto, completely lose focus on where the gun was pointed after a couple of shots. It takes a while to form the habit as an adult, kids, far more inclined to get it pointed where it shouldn't be. And a rookie clearing a jam? I'm amazed at how many don't shoot themselves or the instructor.

Love my P22 though. But not as an initial training tool.
 

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BECAUSE OF ALL THE BELLS AND WHISTLES, SEMI-AUTO PISTOLS ARE DANGEROUS. Semi auto 22 pistols are certainly high if not the highest in accidential discharge.
In that case it's a thousands wonders any of us regular users of this website are still around. Surely, we will all accidentally cause our own demise sooner or later? Maybe the liberals are right? Forgive me for my sarcasm but I find this statement preposterous. If you follow the three most important rules of gun safety how is any particular handgun going to be any less safe than the next?

1. Treat every gun as if it were loaded at all times.
2. Never point it at anything you don't intend to destroy.
3. Keep you finger off the trigger until you intend to fire.

Seems pretty simple to me, but then again, I 'm just a normal, logical thinking type of guy.
 

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In that case it's a thousands wonders any of us regular users of this website are still around.
RJ, the herd might be smaller if everyone learned on a P22, especially in this day and age.

Thousands of new shooters are hitting the ranges, and watching a few, it's not safe in many places. There's newly armed Rappers with pistol grip pump guns shooting clays from the hip. Unsupervised experts who learned the craft watching you-tube, and cop shows. Most have an IQ in line with the caliber they are shooting. And I've watched more than one newbie drop a semi on the first shot.

Most of the regulars on this forum and many others, grew up in a gun culture. Many of us have been shooting for 50 years or more, and learned gun safety at the toe of a boot when necessary. And not with a handgun.

I love my P22, but it's light, short, and easy to point in the wrong direction. You need some pretty practiced habits to use it properly.
 

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RJ, the herd might be smaller if everyone learned on a P22, especially in this day and age.

Thousands of new shooters are hitting the ranges, and watching a few, it's not safe in many places. There's newly armed Rappers with pistol grip pump guns shooting clays from the hip. Unsupervised experts who learned the craft watching you-tube, and cop shows. Most have an IQ in line with the caliber they are shooting. And I've watched more than one newbie drop a semi on the first shot.

Most of the regulars on this forum and many others, grew up in a gun culture. Many of us have been shooting for 50 years or more, and learned gun safety at the toe of a boot when necessary. And not with a handgun.

I love my P22, but it's light, short, and easy to point in the wrong direction. You need some pretty practiced habits to use it properly.
You are worried about newly armed rappers amd youtube noobs, yet you easily point a gun in the wrong direction because it is little and light.

Sounds like the rapper at the range has more to worry about with you pointing your P22 in the wrong directions all the time.
 

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G19, there's no reason to be insulting to other members on the forum.
 

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Sounds like the rapper at the range has more to worry about with you pointing your P22 in the wrong directions all the time.
Not sure where you got that from.

Small autos in new shooters hands are not a good combination, young or old. It takes a lot of time to maintain a safe direction unconsiously, and when I'm coaching new shooters, I find I need to constantly be alert, even to the point of physically maintaining point of aim down range, and not somewhere else. They are particularly dangerous when a jam occurs.

When I point a gun, it's intentional.
 
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