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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi , I just finished casting a large can of lead bullets , should I weigh my bullets before or after sizing and lube ???
please post , zorro
 

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If you want to weight them to be sorted in the closed in weight.I always weighted mine befor sizing or lubing....But then after awhile I didn't even bother to weigh them unless I was into a serious match or what ever..My opinion is it was a **** waste of time...Time I could have used for loading and shooting.....Festus
 

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As long as your lead is hot enough to fill in well in the mold and you keep all of the nasties out that can mess with the flow and cause voids or even get thru then you shouldn't need to worry too much about weighing unless your trying for one ragged hole. Are you casting for pistol or rifle? If you have a digital scale you could just run quality control and weigh every tenth one that you cast. But I've never had a real problem as long as the bullets come out with sharp corners and no voids your usually there.
 

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I weigh all my rifle bullets;even commercial jacketed ones.
It adds accuracy without adding to the cost.
Frank
 

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Unless your after compition accuracy I have always found it a waste of time to weigh all my bullets.....And I have always gotten good accuracy...The main thing is to maintain the same O.A.L if possible...
 

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For rifle bullets or match handgun bullets I will go to some extra trouble and will often weigh them to generate a histogram. That tells me how well I'm casting and it lets me sort out match bullets. However, by itself, it is not enough. Just a probability indicator that you didn't have any made without the mold fully closed (those usually come out too heavy; see below) and you didn't have an abnormal inclusion count, so the bullets are unlikely to be unbalanced.

I make the histogram from the bullets themselves. You just take a big piece of paper and use a ruler to mark the bottom off in tenths of a grain, plus or minus a couple or three grains from the average casting weight, depending on the bullet size. You line the bullets up in columns above their weight. The resulting columns form a weight histogram in the form of a vertical bar graph of bullets. This is instructive. You might expect you would get a bell curve, but you don't. The maximum density of the alloy and the volume of the mold cavities create an upper limit on one side. What you would expect from that, if you did your job perfectly, is a half a bell curve, petering out toward the lighter side as the number of incomplete fills and inclusions increased. In practice, I get that half bell curve, with its fairly sharp dip on the heavy side, followed by a second peak on the heavy side. That second peak is made from bullets case when I didn't get the mold properly closed. It usually means a sprue shaving or other bit of debris was trapped somewhere between the mold faces.

I pull the match bullets aside from under the peak in the half bell curve as having the best fill and alloy density. Then they get measured for average diameter all around. This is to eliminate anything significantly bigger than the others. Oversize could indicate the combination of an improperly closed mold and lightening inclusions gave a good weight in an imbalanced bullet. The smallest bullets of the same weight are usually the most perfect.

Lubing and any sizing come after all that.
 

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For rifle bullets or match handgun bullets I will go to some extra trouble and will often weigh them to generate a histogram. That tells me how well I'm casting and it lets me sort out match bullets. However, by itself, it is not enough. Just a probability indicator that you didn't have any made without the mold fully closed (those usually come out too heavy; see below) and you didn't have an abnormal inclusion count, so the bullets are unlikely to be unbalanced.

I make the histogram from the bullets themselves. You just take a big piece of paper and use a ruler to mark the bottom off in tenths of a grain, plus or minus a couple or three grains from the average casting weight, depending on the bullet size. You line the bullets up in columns above their weight. The resulting columns form a weight histogram in the form of a vertical bar graph of bullets. This is instructive. You might expect you would get a bell curve, but you don't. The maximum density of the alloy and the volume of the mold cavities create an upper limit on one side. What you would expect from that, if you did your job perfectly, is a half a bell curve, petering out toward the lighter side as the number of incomplete fills and inclusions increased. In practice, I get that half bell curve, with its fairly sharp dip on the heavy side, followed by a second peak on the heavy side. That second peak is made from bullets case when I didn't get the mold properly closed. It usually means a sprue shaving or other bit of debris was trapped somewhere between the mold faces.

I pull the match bullets aside from under the peak in the half bell curve as having the best fill and alloy density. Then they get measured for average diameter all around. This is to eliminate anything significantly bigger than the others. Oversize could indicate the combination of an improperly closed mold and lightening inclusions gave a good weight in an imbalanced bullet. The smallest bullets of the same weight are usually the most perfect.

Lubing and any sizing come after all that.

Yeah.....what he said....wtf
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
hi guys , in case of a invaision of flesh eating zombies I will require head shot accrucecy , many thanks, zorro
ps my sword broke
 

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Not to hijack this thread, but what is an acceptable weight difference with cast bullets? I just started casting, and I'm useing wheel weights and a Mountain Molds 270g WFN mold. My first batch was about 30 and they varied in weight between 265 and almost 268g. For the first batch they filled out pretty well, but I know I can do better with a little practice. I remelted ones that were obviously ugly. How close in weight should they be before I can stop obsessing? I'll be shooting them in a Ruger New model BH.
 

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Shoot them to see. As a mold heats up it widens a little. If your alloy changes temperature, that can affect weight too, but none of it is enough to affect accuracy if there are no voids or other uneven distributions of the alloy. Three grains is just fine at the weight your bullet is. If fact, it's just fine in .38 wadcutters that weigh about 150 grains.

What is useful in weighing is to do what I described in post #7, above, and make a histogram. You'll see the trouble-makers stick out, then.
 
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