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Discussion Starter #1
  Would't the 50-110 be a rather easy conversion? I'm thinking of rebarrelling a model 71 to this cal. The 50-110 cartridge is a little shorter than the 348 and the case head is the same. Now that Starline is producing brass this seems to me to be the way to go to have a 50 cal. rifle. What do the more knowledgeable guys think?
 

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My understanding is that the rim dia. of the 50-110 is bigger than the .348, which is the parent round of the .50 Alaskan that is all the rage these days.  The .50 AK would be an easy conversion in a model 71 or an 1886, though.  
Mark

(Edited by mcassill at 10:28 am on Dec. 29, 2001)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
  Thanks for the reply mc. According to COTW the rim diameter of the 50WCF is .607, while the 348 WCF is.610. This leaves room for a conversion either way, doesn't it? Years ago I owned an '86 in 50-110. After my supply of original HV ammo was gone I traded it for a 45-70 SRC. At the time there wasn't source for new ammunition and I new nothing about reloading for the 50-110. I have good memories of what those cartridges did to our local mulies. I think that I'd like to do it again. The rules have changed and the mule deer are scarcer, but it's the huntin' that counts after all. Thanks, again. Mike
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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.50-110 should work perfectly in the '71, as the 71 is basically an 1886.  Possibly some minor mods to get it to feed.  I doubt if the manufacturing tolerances are close enough that the slight difference in rim size would matter!

Yes with the Starline brass this would be a pretty easy way to get a .50 lever gun.  Good reliable smokeless load data may be more difficult to come by, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
     Original .50 caliber '86s are quite scarce and command a high four figure price. I've looked all over the net, plus have called some of my collector friends. I just can't go the tariff on a good one with nickle steel barrel for smokeless powder. If I can scare up a good barrel I may go that route. I recently had a goy offer to trade me a 45-90 with a stainless steel bbl. He wanted my 38-56 so I passed on it. There are several barrel guys around, so having one made is probably the way I'll go. I think a nice 22" half oct. will be just the ticket. Mike, you are correct on the smokeless loads for the .50-110. The selection is very thin. Someone has to have some old Lyman load books in their library. I have not given up, just need more research. God bless you all. Have a safe and prosperous New Year.
                                                                                                           Mike
 

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I own & shoot a 1886 SRC in 50-110 mfg 1917

the 348 is a shortened & necked-down 50-110, so the 50 Alaskan is simply a shortened 50-110.
there also was a 50-100-450 which is the same brass loaded with a heavier bullet ( the 50-110 shoots a 300 gr bullet)
The BIG advantage of the Alaskan over the 50-110 is the barrel twist. The 50-110 was made with a very long twist, suitable only for light bullets ( I never understood why Winchester always loaded light bullets in all their cartridges- the only decent weight for the caliber was the 38-55 at 255 -( I use 280) and it was a Ballard development)
I have made several molds for the 50 and have settled now with 350 gr which stabilizes reliably. Up to 400 still can be made to work.
A 500 grain mold hit paper sideways at 25 meters always ( wouldn't mind using it at halitosis distance)
Now using 350 with 40 of 2400 powder for 1800 fps.
Have not dared to reproduce the WHV loading of 300 gr at 2200fps. Only reference found is 50 gr Sharpshooter powder.
I doubt anyone has developed such a load but am open to suggestions
my other big bore pets are
444 Marlin (rebarreled Remington R.Block)
43 Mauser carbine
43 Spanish carbine RRB
50 remington M71 pistol
56-50 Spencer ( centerfire conversion)
45-70 Contender pistol


just discovered this site- impressive information !!

good 2002 and better shooting !
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Bigboar, that 444 sounds a little too newfangled.....
 

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Discussion Starter #9
  Bigboar, you're right on about the long twist needed to stabilize the .50 cal bullets used by Win. They actually had three offerings, all using the same case with different powder and bullet wts. Rifles so marked are rare indeed. You are lucky to have an SRC in .50, 'cause their ain't too many that have survived the re-barreling that cal. conversion that went on when these old cartridges went out. I just saw another Colt Lightning Pump rifle in 45-90 that has me thinkin'. I really don't know about the practicality of a 50-110 conversion. It just sorta intrigued my ol' soul. Maybe the .50 AK makes more sense. I'm still trying to figure out the 40-65 and 38-56. The darn brass is makin' me broke,too. Keep on burnin' them ol' smokepoles, that's what the're made for. Best wishes to all.
                                                                                                                 Mike
 

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Mike, you mention the 38-56 and 40-65 brass is getting you broke ?  Correct me if I´m wrong, but both are made by simply necking down and perhaps trimming a little 45-70 brass, that must be one of the easiest and cheapest ways of making obsolete cartridges.

I´ll keep the smokepoles booming

bigboar
 

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Discussion Starter #11
  Bigboar,
         I haven't gotten around to buying all the forming dies,yet. Been waiting around to see if Starline would produce some. At this time they are offering 40-65 brass, so I ordered some. For the 38-56 I went to Bertram of Australia. Forty cases are 55 bucks, including shipping. I have loaded some of these cases three or four times with no stretching to speak of. Not much resizing is required. The original '86 can take a serious load with no problems. I use 36gr.IMR 3031 behind a 250 grn .376 LBT. That is the max. on this one, I believe. I haven't done much with the 40-65 'cause there's not too many manufacturers of .406-.408 250 grn bullets out there. I'm shooting these in a Colt Lightning pump, so i'm not too sure what this action can handle. I know that it ain't anywhere near as strong as the 1886.  I'll slowly work on it when I get time and the weather cooperates. Take care.
                                                                                                              Mike
 

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mike,
        you don¨t need no special forming dies.
The case alteration is so small that simply lubing 45-70 brass (I recommend STP oil treatment additive) and doing a pass through the resizing die (which I assume you have) will give you perfect cases.
You may require annealing of the case before forming.

give it a try, you won´t regret it.
 

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HI,

I will give you my two cents on this as I have a 50 Alaskan and like it.I wanted however to get a 525 grain bullet going 2,200 fps so I went with a 50-110,Dave Clay is making one for me right now.The twist of the barrel is not a problem as Dave gets a blank barrel and redoes it,and the barrel needs to handle the higher pressure any way.One more thing is it will shoot both the 50-110 and 50AK,I also know that BBA is tecting ammo for the 50-110 and you have a good chance of seeing some ammo from them for the 50-110. It is a step up from the 50 Alaskan and that is saying a lot.I learned this through spending to much money and wish I had known this before,just my two cents hope it can help someone,Thanks,Kev
 
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