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An old cartridge known as the 22 Savage Hi Power. The cartridge was also known as The IMP at one time. The Savage 99 was chambered for the caliber, maybe other rifles as well.
 

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Just a matter of timing. Back in the very beginning, .226-.228 was the common size for the few .22's of the black powder era. In the 1880's-1890's, were three lack powder center fires that were pretty common (.22Maynard, 22-15 Stevens, and the .22 WCF). All were loaded with lead bullets, all used bullets from .226 to .228".

Guess you can count the .22 Savage high-Power as the first smokeless factory .22 about 1912 or so. While they used smokeless steel, they kept to the older BP bore size. On a guess, that would also allow existing bullets and bullet molds to be used as cast bullets.

It's not that they didn't have smaller bore .22's, the .22rim fires were mostly .223". Would have to guess at thier mind-set back then, but evidently ceneterfire = .228 / rim fire = .223 was how they thought.

First factory offered smokeless .22 varmint oriented round would be the .22 Hornet, and many of the early ones used .223" rather than todays .224". And as you might guess, the very first were converted .22 rim fires.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The reason I asked about the .227 dia. bullets is because I went to an established sporting good shop known for it's reloading supply expertise. I wanted some longer bullets for an ar with a 1/8 rate of twist. The fellow , one of the owners , told me those 70 gr. would be fine in an ar. I did not look at the box until I returned home. Much to my surprise I noted the dia. and wondered what he did and if he had just made an error. I called the store and the lady said they would exchange them. Can they now be trusted or should I move on?
 

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Kind of a unique statement... I don't see why they can't be trusted, it was a simple mistake, and probably wouldn't have hurt anything...
 

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Honestly yes, it probably wouldn't cause any problems... I've heard of plenty of guys shoving 8mm Mauser down a 30-06... not necessarily intentional though, most military ammo is not marked as to what cartridge it is. Use at your own risk though.
 

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Probably just pulled the wrong box. Same brand, same color box, just grabbed the wrong one.... or the sales guy really didn't know any better (a whole lot of people behind gun counters don't know reloading, or much of anything else). bring them back, you won't be using them, and some .22 Savage shooter would be pleased to find them.

Problem with loading them would be in case neck thickness. Once you jammed a .003" wider bullet into the case, have a chance of it making the case neck fat enough that when jammed into the chamber and the the round fired, it couldn't let go of the bullet.

Being .003" too large for the bore isn't going to do pressure a bit of good either, but I'd bet on the lack of room to release the bullet as the most probable cause of a "boom".
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you for your input. Common sense and reloading manuals should tell one that you would NOT load .227 bullets for a rifle that calls for a .224 bullet. There are things I would like to know about bottle neck reloading that are new to me as I load only 454 and 44mag however I have been doing that for 30 yrs.
 

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For what it's worth, twice in my shooting/reloading life (about 45 years) have managed to get into bullet neck thickness trouble (and a 3rd time that was just odd as ****, but not really dangerous)

Once with a rifle, once with a pistol. Both times i had cases that were right for one gun's chamber, and foolishly used them in another gun without checking for a tight chamber.

#1. Using .243 cases reformed from .308's. had reamed them (reaming was more common back then than outside turning) to allow the right bullet release for the .243 being shot, and they worked great. Foolishly used those cases in a 2nd tight neck .243 a few years later, and blew the primer on the first shot. Eroded a pit in the bolt face from the escaping gas, blew off the exractor.

#2. Same as above, cases made for a Vietnam bring-back Tok. pistol as there were no commercial .30 Tok cases. Used them in a 2nd pistol, recoil was fierce, and out ejected what looked like 9mm cases. With no room to let the bullet go, the cases ripped apart at the shoulder, and bullet/case mouth fired dwon the barrel. No idea what pressure might have been, other than way-way too much.
 
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