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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a newbie....A real newbie and I have some questions.

I'm considering buying a revolver and have looked at the Ruger Vaquero in .44Mag. In their catalog it says that it is a "color cased finish".  I know it refers to the finish on the frame, but why do they, as well as other manufacturers, finish the frame this way?

Ruger only offers a "blued" frame in the .45.

Colt will customize their "P" model in blued frame if you want, but they don't have a .44 at all.  Only a .44-40.

I noticed a lot of questions on revolvers using .44Mag but not so many on .45.  What is so special about the .44 over .45?

I haven't read every post, but I haven't seen any that talked about the Colt "P" models or the "Cowboy" model.  Is there something wrong with these?  I know the "P" models are quite expensive.  At least I thought so when I called the Customer Service and asked them what the MSRP was.

Question 4.  What is slugging a barrel?

The reason for these questions is that I've been looking at some of the CAS sites and it sounds kinda' fun.  In the back of my mind I'm also thinking of a rifle (Marlin '94 Cowboy) in the same caliber of any revolver I may buy.

Thanks in advance.

Two-Bits
 

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Hi, Two-Bits:
   Color case hardening is a very old method of heat treating steel. It hardens the surface for wear resistance but leaves the interior softer and less brittle.  This gives the steel a mottled blue & brown color. Modern alloys are hard but not brittle, so the treatment isn't needed.  A color case finish looks like hardening, but is just a finish, I think???

   I'm not up to speed on the Colt Model P.

   .44 vs. .45 is a Chev vs. Ford argument.  There's a very long thread on this that started about this time last year.
 
   Slugging the barrel means pushing an oversized soft lead slug through the barrel to measure the bore. A .50 calibre round ball works well.  If you're shooting lead, rather than jacketed bullets, you must use a bullet .001-002" larger than the bore, or the barrel will lead like crazy. The bullet also must be tight in the cylinder throats.  So ideally, a revolver should have cylinder throats .001" larger than the bore and you would use a bullet .001" larger than the throats.  Trouble spots are under sized throats and a thread choke. That means the barrel is tight where it threads into the frame, but loosens up towards the muzzle, resulting in leading.  This happens because the powder gas blows by the loose bullet and melts the lead.  Fixes are posted here, but it's getting late. We'll look them up later.

   Welcome to the forum.

Bye
Jack



<!--EDIT|Jack Monteith|June 14 2002,00:12-->
 

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Discussion Starter #4
If you push a lead ball down the barrel to slug it, why doesn't it get stuck, or what if it did?  How would you get it out?  Do you just use a cleaning rod to force the ball through?  Hey! How about a wooden dowl about the size of the bore?

Jack: I Appreciate your info on cylinder throat size etc.  Seems like the manfacturers would set this to optimum settings so you would not have to do any  after purchase upgrades.

Seems like a lot of posts talk about and point out resizing different calibrations on Rugers.

It also seems as if a lot of people like 'em, but it sure seems like they need a lot of adjustments!
 

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Hi, Two-Bits:
   There's a discussion on firelapping & throat reaming here:
http://shootersforum.com/cgi-bin....1;t=511

    Mr. Gates says Ruger has the best do-it-yourself kit on the market.  Sure seems that way.

   I'd highly recommend Marshall's book before you try fire-lapping. I brought a couple of rifles back to life by fire-lapping them. http://www.beartoothbullets.com/bulletselect/index.htm

    Generally soft lead slugs aren't hard to push through once you get them started in an oiled bore.  I use muzzleloader Hornady or Speer round balls for big bores and 00 buck for .30 calibres.  Start them with a big hammer and a brass punch, then push them through with a cleaning rod.  Marshall's book has instructions for handling the tough ones.

   Check out this site for some pics of color case hardening by a master.
http://www.gunshop.com/dougt.htm

Bye
Jack
 

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Hi, Two-bits:
  The first rule here is "If it ain't broke, don't fix it." Put a 100 rounds through the gun before you do any fixing.  If it's shooting straight and not leading, leave it alone.  Most barrels need breaking in, with frequent cleaning for the first box or two.

Bye
Jack
 
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