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It is curious that every site you go to that every round is sold out across the country. The stores are sold out and it didn't help that the local Walmart elected to stop selling all pistol ammo. I have read this is all about the corona virus, but it seems hard to shoot the virus with a bullet. This shortage is worse than any I've seen in the past. Fortunately I do reload for most of my pistol cartridges. I have just started loading for .380 for my Bersa's and Keltec. I had most of everything for .380 ready to go, but I just hadn't put it all together to get started. I just finished casting about 100 of the Lyman 92 grain round nose bullets. Even reloading components are in short supply. I did find today that Midway had in stock 100 round packages of the .355 90 grain gold dot hollow points, so I ordered 2 bags. I had 2 pounds stored away of Vhitavori N310 pistol powder so that will be my go to for the .380. I also have a couple pounds of red dot which will work well also. I'm just really unsure as to how long all this will last. My biggest fear is that Biden gets elected ....then our shooting sports will see serious issues with his agenda against guns. I sure am missiing all the gun shows and al the stuff that was available.
Ohio Rusty ><>
 

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From what I understand, Hodgden powders have been specified for certain military cartridges, which is sucking up production resources, making some of the more popular powders, like Varget, H4350, Retumbo, and H1000 harder to find, so more people are buying Alliant, IMR, and anything else they can grab, making several of the Reloder line (especially Reloder 26), and many of the staples from the traditional IMR line difficult to find.

As far as ammo goes, yeah, panic buying.
 

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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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From what I understand, Hodgden powders have been specified for certain military cartridges, which is sucking up production resources, making some of the more popular powders, like Varget, H4350, Retumbo, and H1000 harder to find, so more people are buying Alliant, IMR,

You understand incorrectly.
Hodgdon doesn't make a single once of smokeless powder, and never has; they are a surplus reseller.
"IMR" or "Alliant" also make nothing, they are brand names for labeling.

 

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What has been said above, plus record gun sales the last couple months. Many people who never dreamed they would own a gun or believed anyone else should own one panicked due to the civil unrest and waited in line to buy a firearm. These same "Woke" people can't be counted to change their vote come election day because they will have forgotten all about why they bought a firearm in the first place and vote for the same politicians that are ignoring the second amendment.
 

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Sad to say, this situation seems to be the new normal in many parts of the country. It may pass after the election. We have seen this before and gotten through it. All the best...
Gil
 

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You understand incorrectly.
Hodgdon doesn't make a single once of smokeless powder, and never has; they are a surplus reseller.
"IMR" or "Alliant" also make nothing, they are brand names for labeling.
This is what I was referring to, maybe I'm not reading it correctly.

 

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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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This is what I was referring to, maybe I'm not reading it correctly.

You didn't read the link I gave you, and you read All Outhouse instead. :rolleyes:

General Dynamics, Thales, Rhinemetal, Groupe SNPE, Nammo.

They make the smokeless powder you have used, under one "brand name" or another. They only build powder for defense contacts, and policing contracts.
So anything they made was with the "military" in mind, not some of it.

Hodgdon buys surplus from one of the auction houses, or puts their name on the list for some new powder when a mill is doing a run. But Hodgdon didn't invent, create, work closely with, discover, or otherwise tell more than about 2% of the truth in any of the stories they have posted over the years, about what a powder was used for or where it came from.

They buy by the burning rate, not a singular thing. Hodgdon was filling an order for "IMR4064" but ran short of that specific General Dynamics powder, so they bought a different powder with a similar burning rate from Rhinemetal, and filled the bottles.

That is how the waste market gets supplied, regardless of what "the brand that's true" tells a prepper blog writer.

Cheers
 
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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Here in the NW corner of Colorado supplies are kinda low, maybe, but I was able to go buy a pound of 'Lil Gun (a Hodgy relabel) a the local Murdoch's. Ammo seemed plentiful but that's not what I was after so I really didn't pay attention. Primers-a-plenty, brass, if you like Hornady or Starline was adequate. The only bad part was navigation as the nit wit manager moved all the gun stuff.

Shortage? No, not really.

RJ
 
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here in sw PA only 223 rem and the 9mm (two cartridges that i don't and won't have) are sold out. everything else is still on the shelves. i haven't bought a factory load for about 26 or 27 years ago.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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same here. Reload only and those few cartridges I don't, have a substantial supply on hand. The web sites for suppliers and the email plus flyers seem to indicate an abundant supply out there.
 

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You didn't read the link I gave you, and you read All Outhouse instead. :rolleyes:

General Dynamics, Thales, Rhinemetal, Groupe SNPE, Nammo.

They make the smokeless powder you have used, under one "brand name" or another. They only build powder for defense contacts, and policing contracts.
So anything they made was with the "military" in mind, not some of it.

Hodgdon buys surplus from one of the auction houses, or puts their name on the list for some new powder when a mill is doing a run. But Hodgdon didn't invent, create, work closely with, discover, or otherwise tell more than about 2% of the truth in any of the stories they have posted over the years, about what a powder was used for or where it came from.

They buy by the burning rate, not a singular thing. Hodgdon was filling an order for "IMR4064" but ran short of that specific General Dynamics powder, so they bought a different powder with a similar burning rate from Rhinemetal, and filled the bottles.

That is how the waste market gets supplied, regardless of what "the brand that's true" tells a prepper blog writer.

Cheers
I read what you posted, and I understand how powder production and resale works, but I also understand how military supply contracts work. We once put several sidewinder missiles out of service, because the required maintenance could not be completed, because I could not get the specified color of spray paint, from the specified supplier, due to a "production shortage". We were shipping cans of spray paint across the country, two or three cans at a time, while F-22 pilot training was being delayed, all because we were prevented by contracts from going in town to Lowe's or Home Depot and get the same color off the shelf. So while I know Hodgdon doesn't actually make the powder, I don't think that wouldn't necessarily stop the DoD from specifying it.
 

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What I find strange is that this is not the first time shooters and reloaders have been through times of shortages related to ammunition and various reloading components and even equipment but many still act and question as if it is. I learned a long time ago even before some of the first shortages appeared way back when that you have to take into consideration that there may come a day when you just can't walk into a store an buy the ammunition you want or find components to reload for what you shoot.

The same goes for other basic necessities as well especially in this day and time when there is so much unrest and uncertainty at home and around the world. Kinda reminds me of the story of the grasshopper and the ant. When times are good buy a little at a time and put some back for a rainy day and you want find yourself wanting when everyone else is doing without.
 

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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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So while I know Hodgdon doesn't actually make the powder, I don't think that wouldn't necessarily stop the DoD from specifying it.
No probably not. But specifying "it" isn't what what you think it is. A very good many of the names Hodgdon sells, have random blends or differing suppliers.
If you spend a little time reading through Import/Export paperwork (which is not awesome btw) you'll see that for any given Hodgdon name, there may be 4-5 different powders in the product. So it's a little less than genuine to say(example) "H4895 is approved by the military", because that one time, there was that one lot...

Cheers
 

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You understand incorrectly.
Hodgdon doesn't make a single once of smokeless powder, and never has; they are a surplus reseller.
"IMR" or "Alliant" also make nothing, they are brand names for labeling.

I suspect that you know only part of the story, like many of us.

While Hodgdon doesn't "make" smokeless powder for rifles or pistols they do make Black Powder (GOEX) in their Kansas plant (I had a relative work there so I know it exists). They also own the IMR and Western powder rights which they contract with several companies to make for them.

Alliant (ATK) is the only American powder company to own it's own manufacturing plant in the United States.

There are only two plants that manufacture smokeless powder in the United States; Alliant in Radford Virginia and Primex (now General Dynamics) in St. Marks Florida (they manufacture ball powders only).

The problem is that both ATK and General Dynamics have tried to create a monopoly on all the smokeless powder production in the United States by creating a new company called the American Powder Company. I don't know if that company still exists, I know that there was at least one legal action to stop the creation of the company. Both the Radford plant and the St. Marks plant are being managed by one or the other company and they both provide powder for government use (military, law enforcement, etc.). If you wanted to control the production of smokeless powder all you'd have to do is create one company that controlled all the manufacturing of it in the U.S. and make a few changes in the import laws - which happened during the last Presidential Administration (International Traffic in Arms Regulations - ITAR) .
 

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Sounds like a page out of the DuPont history book. Atlas Hercules and DuPont Became three companies......
 

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The Shadow (Super Mod)
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While Hodgdon doesn't "make" smokeless powder for rifles or pistols they do make Black Powder (GOEX) in their Kansas plant They also own the IMR and Western powder rights which they contract with several companies to make for them.

Alliant (ATK) is the only American powder company to own it's own manufacturing plant in the United States.

There are only two plants that manufacture smokeless powder in the United States; Alliant in Radford Virginia and Primex (now General Dynamics) in St. Marks Florida (they manufacture ball powders only).

The problem is that both ATK and General Dynamics have tried to create a monopoly on all the smokeless powder production in the United States by creating a new company called the American Powder Company. I don't know if that company still exists, I know that there was at least one legal action to stop the creation of the company. Both the Radford plant and the St. Marks plant are being managed by one or the other company and they both provide powder for government use (military, law enforcement, etc.). If you wanted to control the production of smokeless powder all you'd have to do is create one company that controlled all the manufacturing of it in the U.S. and make a few changes in the import laws - which happened during the last Presidential Administration (International Traffic in Arms Regulations - ITAR) .
I specifically stated smokeless powder, but yes I'm aware that Hodgdon bought the Louisiana Goex plant which shortly exploded, then was rebuilt in Kansas.



Yes I know about the brand names and marketing agreements. I've posted several threads about that over the years, or you could have simply read the link provided in my first reply.:D
Hodgdon doesn't "contract with many companies" for smokeless rifle powder. It's General Dynamics and Thales. They aren't above surplus deals and opportunistic purchases; but major supply is only 2 sources.

You are wrong about Orbital-ATK.
They don't produce any rifle powder, and I'm not positive they actually produce the pistol and shotgun powder they sell. They had access to the excess steam coming out of the Radford Arsenal, which is a government Arsenal; not private. The only privately owned rifle powder plant in the USA, is General Dynamics St. Marks facility. Which was formerly owned by Olin. The Primex spinoff, was one of many many steps Olin took to not completely go bankrupt, but it was Olin who owned St. Marks.

The joint company happened some time ago, and as BAE is running Radford, don't think Orbital-ATK has much say in what they want.... That joint attempt, was as much about GD trying to horn-in, on a struggling ATK. ATK was struggling to operate the arsenals to capacity for the sand wars, so many folks got brought in. Companies like Hornady started supplying bullets (remember the "we aren't discontinuing bullets to work on G contracts" BS?) to speed they plant up, and GD brought in the operational knowledge to speed them up. Hornady's reward was having access to excess production streams. So now you see them selling LC brass. Well GD wanted access to the Radford excess stream, and the joint venture was born. Joke was on them, as ATK merged with Orbital, and they lost the contract to the facility anyway.

So if privately owned and operated, meaning not governmental arsenals; They're has been only one company producing smokeless rifle powder in the US, and it's been that way for quite some time.

Cheers
 
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All I know is that I am basically a new shooter. I haven't been able to own or possess a firearm for quite a long while. As of January 2020 I had my gun rights restored. It really sucks that the restoration of my gun rights and this blankety-blank virus pandemic happened to coincide. Just my luck. Everyone is freaking out buying up all the ammunition and all of the firearms right at the same time then I'm trying to buy the same things for a different reason. Now I look like a pandemic shopper! That's okay though, I'm getting all of my reloading equipment and casting equipment now so I don't ever have to go through this crap again. That being said, anybody that has used Dillon 750 for sale cheap I'll take it! Or anything I can use to reload.
 

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My advice is buy powder (when you can find it) 8 lbs at a time. And bullets 1000 at a time. Don't waste your time buying a lb of powder here and a box of a 100 bullets there. Go big, because it may be the last time you find anything for years. We went 8 years before hardly anyone could buy 22 ammo. (Now I have enough for the rest of my life.) We're going back into a difficult time due to uncertainty and if President Trump is not re elected you won't see ammo or supplies in any quantity for at least 4 years after that or until we get another Republican president. If by the grace of God we get Trump re elected we will have 4 more happy years of plentiful supplies and will ensure freedom for another 50 years.
 
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