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P-17 and Jap.
 

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The 'pro' went with the law of averages.
There were about 30 times more P-17s sold as surplus than P-14s.:cool:

Bubba leaned hard on those!

I'd like to see the rear ring a little better. There have been a BUNCH of different ways of filling the 'bird bath' and grinding the rear ring to shape. The one above seems to have a raised rib down the middle but no part of the scope mount shows outside the Tasco ring that fits a Weaver base. A little mysterious and would draw my attention if seen at a gunshow.....if I looked past the chrome.
 
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Pretty good conversions from the outside...would have to see the insides to know more,but it doesn't look like bubba-type work externally.
We have no idea what condition they were in to start with. Today,doing that to a mint mil.spec. rifle gets collectors upset,but if back-then he started with barreled action/bubba's hacksaw conversions?
My thoughts are that if you start out with one that already had the collectors value knocked off it, where is the foul in a nicer conversion?...how is that worse that trying to get it back to orginal, which at best creates a "fake orginal"?
Actually, they look like good hunting rifles to me...at least the P17. Even the Arisaka if it has a good orginal barrel.
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About 1980, bought a used P17 conversion that looked a whole lot like that one.
Wasw sitting in the used rifle section of a large gun shop....looked good, but not real fancy, great wood,and was priced nice. Caught my eye becasue there were some markings. Serial number,assembly numbers, British proofs. Stamped for for 220gr. and Cordite,I assumed 30-06vrom a visual....but wasn't sure.
For like $200 it was mine to fine out....worst case, the stock would be worth half that.
Checked out nice at home (30-06 chamber,headspace,all the hidden metal work,inletting, and a nice bore). Pulling the scope and mounts (much like yours) found a BSA stamp on the bill block fitted to where the orginal rear sight once was.
Never researched it....definately was a conversion,but at BSA.
 

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After I looked closer it appears to be a US Ordnance Bomb on top of the bolt handle that did not get polished off. Now, could still be a 17 bolt in a P14, but hard to tell anything else from just the 2 pictures for me.

I really like 1917's. Great big strong actions that can handle just about anything. There is something about the shape of the bolt handle that just makes it look perfect to me.

I have 3, a 300 WM and (2) 06's. One day I want to have one of the 06's converted to a 375 H&H. Read about that conversion a long time ago and it is one of my bucket rifles. Should be just the ticket for SE Ohio Yotes and Groundhogs.
 

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Welcome to the Forum. Those are interesting pictures and it would be great to know the calibers and any history involved in the acquisition. Back in the day there were plenty of surplus rifles on sale for very little money and hobby gunsmithing was a national past time. These rifles appear to have been nicely done from the photos. All the best...
Gil
 

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The butter knife bolt handle on the Jap rifle made me laugh ... I'm sorry it just looks so funny and out of place . These are usually seen on German Mannlicher Sporting rifles .
With the help of 1960's Herter's "sporter" stocks, I did a few bubba jobs myself ...
these are examples of at home gunsmithing and surplus military rifles that abounded in that time period .
Some examples aren't bad , I still have a 1903A3 Springfield and Model 95 Mauser sporters that came out very well .
Welcome to the forum and thanks for posting the photo's ...brought back some nice memories .
Gary
 

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JB. How did you know that the Enfield was a P17 and not a P14. I think I agree after looking at the pictures more closely, but I would like to know what a professional saw.
Ding ding ding winner!!!
 

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As said the P17 was a strong action. There were 3 plants that made them during WWl. Winchester, Remington, and Eddystone. When roy weatherby started his Magnum line he first used the P17 as his action. today you can find some of those early rifles chambered for 300 Weatherby. roy abandoned that action and made his own, Mark V (German/Japan/USA). BUT he kept the ugly P17 Safety, still used today.
 

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I've never seen a P-17 Weatherby but for the .378 and .460s but plenty of L.A and Southgate marked FNs in the smaller calibers. The safety on a Mk-V is on the shroud instead of the tang, but they act on the firing pin the same way (blocked and locked).

I've seen exactly ONE really nice looking P-17, but there were two of them built. Unfortunately the photographer knew little about guns (at that time) and the only pictures don't show the genius of Ted Blackburn's metal work. The #4 ACGG gun ('88) was double-square bridged, dropped box, .416 Rigby express rifle engraved by Sam Welch and stocked by Bob Emmons. I finally had to ask Ted what action he started with. It was totally unrecognizable as an Enfield. He made a matching .375 engraved by Giuseppe Forte that was part of the Bob Peterson collection.
 

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i cant find any marking on it except 599173
The rifle with the butter knife handle is a Arisaka, I have one that I purchased already modified in in 1976, It was in .243. Took it to a local gunsmith as it had some feeding issues, fixed it right up and also said that it had a Douglas Supreme bbl. It has accounted for a lot of Deer over the years. Still have it.
 

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I have used my daughter's Remington 783 in .243, to hunt deer here in Michigan a couple of years. I never shot at a deer, but I really love the gun. A very low cost, very accurate and low recoiling gun, by a reputable company. While there are a couple others that are making the same type of gun, a low cost bolt action rifle, the Remington is the only one I have shot. I think that Savage makes one, as does Mossberg. All good rifles, at a very excellent price. Better than you could have bought 25 years ago, at twice the price. Modern technology has done a lot for both rifles, and also pistols. For 600$ you can buy a 1911 that would have cost you probably 1500$ 25 years ago, and that is in the dollars of that day. The 1911 that you pay 6 bills for now will have just about everything you could want in both a carry gun and even a competition gun.
 

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I have a solution for the future generation of recoil intolerant hunters and it just might get kids off the gaming so much. Build the hand controllers so they recoil everytime the kid shoots or fires a missle. Be just our luck though they would just all switch to candy crush uunnggghhh.
 

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I have used my daughter's Remington 783 in .243, to hunt deer here in Michigan a couple of years. I never shot at a deer, but I really love the gun. A very low cost, very accurate and low recoiling gun, by a reputable company. While there are a couple others that are making the same type of gun, a low cost bolt action rifle, the Remington is the only one I have shot. I think that Savage makes one, as does Mossberg. All good rifles, at a very excellent price. Better than you could have bought 25 years ago, at twice the price. Modern technology has done a lot for both rifles, and also pistols. For 600$ you can buy a 1911 that would have cost you probably 1500$ 25 years ago, and that is in the dollars of that day. The 1911 that you pay 6 bills for now will have just about everything you could want in both a carry gun and even a competition gun.
I can’t argue that they aren’t more accurate and have better triggers but they are so damn ugly😩
 
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