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The BFR grip looks like it has room behind the guard. My middle knuckle is fully 1" across from a life with heavy bows. I have had it cut to shreds by a SBH with factory grips.
Maybe the worst is my old Vaquero when I started shooting 320 and 335 gr bullets. Nobody ever shot all six. I installed Signature grips and it is OK. It has taken many deer with the heavy bullets at around 1160 FPS.
A .357 is a good suggestion with the proper bullet. A S&W can't be beat.
Anyway gun weight really helps and a SRH with an Ultra Dot really tames a .44. I would think the BFR would be great and I wish I had some money. I have a BH in .41 and when I shot it last it was fierce. I have to get dies and make a mold for it. The worst is the aluminum grip frame.
 

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I didn't think the new BFR 'Bisley shaped' grip frame will fit the old D-MAX 'Ruger SBH' grip guns, but now I'm not sure based on your comments in this exchange from 2012, what say you Max?: D-MAX BFRs | Single-Actions
We were going to graft a Ruger Bisley on a BFR (not the D-Max). It requires fairly major custom surgery. The various Ruger grip frames will bolt onto a D-Max (I have one in .454 with a Ruger Bisley grip attached). Hope that clarifies things!
 

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We were going to graft a Ruger Bisley on a BFR (not the D-Max). It requires fairly major custom surgery. The various Ruger grip frames will bolt onto a D-Max (I have one in .454 with a Ruger Bisley grip attached). Hope that clarifies things!
Yeah, I knew any of the Ruger SBH grip frames will fit my D-Max, being as the one that came on it is the SBH square back trigger guard grip frame. What my 'hope' was is that the new BFR 'Bisley interpretation' grip frame would fit my gun but, sadly, I now know that it will not fit. Now all I have to do is find a stainless Ruger Bisley grip frame.
I again looked at the above link from 2012 on the 'Single Actions' forum, and saw on page 2, that I had also weighed in on the conversation back then.
 

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I started my pistol shooting life, many decades ago, with a Ruger BlKHawk in 44mag,... 44mag is still my go to hunting pistol caliber. I have owned a dozen or so, many makes and models, from SA to Bisley, to DA/SA in 44mag.

I have to agree with the comments above, on the Redhawk comfort with heavy hunting loads!
I have been down sizing for a decade now, and my Ruger Redhawk is the only 44mag that has not left the safe,.... if that says anything.
 

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I started my pistol shooting life, many decades ago, with a Ruger BlKHawk in 44mag,... 44mag is still my go to hunting pistol caliber. I have owned a dozen or so, many makes and models, from SA to Bisley, to DA/SA in 44mag.

I have to agree with the comments above, on the Redhawk comfort with heavy hunting loads!
I have been down sizing for a decade now, and my Ruger Redhawk is the only 44mag that has not left the safe,.... if that says anything.
Agree and gun weight is the way to tame any caliber. Some that are shot from a revolver can blacken a shoulder from a rifle.
The RH is a good gun except for the spring arrangement. The SRH fixed that.
The only gun I refused to shoot was Whitworth's .50 Alaskan with super high polished Bisley grips. He is one tough *** and split his head open but kept on shooting. I will never understand the love of the Bisley.
 

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A S&W 629 with a long barrel, Hogue grips, and reduced loads (around 1000 fps) is pretty comfortable to shoot while still quite effective. A top option for arthritic hands may well be a long slide 1911 in 10mm. Very comfortable grip, semi-auto action to help distribute the recoil over time, and a caliber with .357 Mag+ performance.
 

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I'm a bit confused?
The grip on a single action is designed to roll into the hand and allow the muzzle to flip up reducing the felt recoil considerably. Since the sidearm must be re-cocked prior to sending the next round this is operationally efficient. DA revolvers direct the rounds recoil into the web of the hand which doesn't alleviate felt recoil.
Since I regularly absorb felt recoil, as an Old Man perhaps I'm missing a key element of this conversation?
 

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I'm a bit confused?
The grip on a single action is designed to roll into the hand and allow the muzzle to flip up reducing the felt recoil considerably. Since the sidearm must be re-cocked prior to sending the next round this is operationally efficient. DA revolvers direct the rounds recoil into the web of the hand which doesn't alleviate felt recoil.
Since I regularly absorb felt recoil, as an Old Man perhaps I'm missing a key element of this conversation?
True, but some of the DA grips are really efficient at absorbing recoil - even more so than the rolling of the SA revolvers. On the flip side, back when I had some Super Blackhawks, I tried replacing the wood grips with Pachmayer grips; a terrible thing to do. Those grips, even though they were rubber, redirected the recoil straight into the palm of my hand, whereas the standard grip would allow the revolver to roll in my hand. They were painful! So I know where you're coming from.
 

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Thnink about how a revolver aactually rotates during recoil.

Doesn't the grip try to slide DOWN....and isn't the human hand smaller at the bottom (pinky finger) than at the top?

So a fat bottom gripis pretty much the reverse of a human hand's grip which is large at the top and small at the bottom....but the big stocks LOOKS nice (and looks sell guns).
Most revolers,single action or double action, show up with grips wider at the bottom than at the top...and here we sit with hands that grip wider at the top than at the bottom.

It's also a fault in most semi-autos,so I'm not being too bias (although semi-auto recoil is a bit different)

Recoil trus to rotate the grip down...human handsw are already tapered in that direction.

So to stop rotation of the grip,add finger grooves to non-slippery material or reverser taper the grip so it's fatter at the top than at the bottom.

The first (finger gooves) looks "cool". The seconf (reverse taper" looks "wrong",and looks are what sells handguns.
 

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I had recoil issues with my SBH 44 Mag and solved it with a set of Hogue rubber grips. No, they're not pretty but they do soak up the recoil. I've got em on my 357 and 45 Colt BH too.
 

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I had this in my right wrist for a while after an ulnar osteotomy to relieve ulnar impaction (no more cartilage) from running 1" impact wrenches overhead changing cutting my edges on D10's and D11's.



Hence the glove with the wrist wrap.

RJ
 

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Hey JWSmith - did you ever change guns or calibers?
I agree with the posters that say the Redhawk with Pachmyr presentations are comfortable, and my Redhawk is a little more accurate than my SBH, both with 7.5" barrels.
The suggestion of going to .357 wasn't a bad one. The GP -100 grip with the rubber and 2 wood panels is the most comfortable to me of any grip with magnum loads. The Super Redhawk is similar.
 
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