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Tress years ago I bought myself a Traditions Hawken Woodsman .50 cal flintlock rifle, I have shot less than 100 rounds through it and it was cleaned after each session, aside from two scratches, the matte finish the brass has taken, and a but of crud on the end of the ramrod, it is still practically mint. the mainspring did break on me though, and I replaced it, Traditions customer service is amazing. I can't seem to beat my flinch and would like to sell it, and use the money to buy a cap lock version. What do you think it's worth?
 

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Is it 1-48 twist? The reason I ask is I have an older Traditions Woodsman .50 caliber but it was the original model with the 1-66 twist. It is percussion and a real shooter. They were offered when Traditions put them in Sportsman's Guide. When I saw the barrel twist being a round ball barrel, I had to have it. I also have a .50 caliber Traditions Woodsman Flintlock model with a 1-48 twist. I purchased it used and paid $185.00 plus shipping. I really like the flintlocks better then the percussion. I would suggest try and over come the flinch. Once you do, they are a real pleasure to shoot and hunt with.

Looking at them just now, I noticed the older model with the slow twist has a shorter barrel. I just measured it and it is 26" so its not some optical illusion. I never noticed that before until I put them side by side. Very interesting point. The flintlock has a 28" barrel. There were some T/C Hawken Flintlocks next to them and I guess that's why the barrel length caught my eye. When I noticed that, I checked the barrel to make sure I was looking at a Traditions Woodsman Hawkens, and it is. The other difference between the two is the percussion says 1-66 where the other is marked 1-48 for twist. I will say my 1-48 twist is a very accurate shooting rifle also.

New, these rifles are selling for $300 plus money, the flintlock being even more. So to set a value, I would say ... think carefully if you really want to sell it and then what you're willing to loose on the sale. New is new, but used is used. They are great rifles.
 

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Best sold in Pennsylvania, there primitive deer season is FLINYLOCK ONLY. So they sell for more there.

personally I prefer flint over caplock, more fun/challenge.
 

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Last rifle I bought used was a Thompson Center .45 Hawken Flintlock....looks like it was never shot.
$150 bucks....for a pawn shop n Kansas.
 

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The old saying is that if you can feel the delay in a flintlock, it ain't timed correctly. Moisture is another thing entirely. In a late hunt, I'd go with a cap lock. I also missed where you hale from. Remember that the powder in the pan isn't supposed to reach the touch hole. It lays in the pan and only the flash penetrates the touch hole. 4F pan powder is really necessary. However, I once watched a hand made, replica, golden age Kentucky Rifle builder, load his pan, using only the powder rammed down the barrel, and it was still super quick.
Changing out the pan powder every twenty minutes, helps with these ignition moisture problems, on a cold, wet, winter's day. IIRC, that hand made replica flintlock was also a fifty caliber. But it probably had a very expensive lock, on it.
 
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