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Discussion Starter #1
I would like to hear comments on what you think is right about revolvers.  For example:

1.  I don't have to chase my brass.
 

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1. Don`t have to check to see if the safety is on.                   2. Don`t have to rack the slide.   3. Don`t have to worry about magazine capacity.                  4. Don`t have to be concerned with the revolver jamming.          5. Don`t have to pray and spray.   6. Can use the more powerful handguns,and what they will shoot.  7. I like, no love the looks and feel of revolvers!
 

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I don't think there's anything necessarily wrong with auto's, I have a few of them.  I really like them.  However, I do like the looks, feel and fit of both the SA and DA revolvers better.  I also like being able to get a particular gun in just about any cartridge.  I tend to shoot revolvers a little better than autos too, especially at longer ranges.  I like both, but prefer my revolvers.
 

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I have a friend who was a US Air Force survival instructor from the 1950s to 1970s.
We discussed survival guns more than once. He based his beliefs on personal experience and the debriefings of hundreds of military men who had been in survival situations.
Overwhelmingly, the wish for a .22 rimfire rifle was expressed.
When I mentioned a handgun for survival, he recommended the .22 rimfire without hesitation.
And he quickly stressed, "Make it a revolver. Automatics can lose their clips and then you're left with a single-shot pistol."
To which I hasten to add that some automatics will not fire with the magazine (clip) removed. Thus, the loss of a magazine in a survival situation will leave you with a club (unless you can somehow disable this feature).
A revolver of 6 or 9-shot capacity, in .22 Long Rifle, with adjustable sights and at least 4" barrel would be perfect.
It must be accurate enough to shoot small game in the head at 25 yards. It must be simple to operate and maintain.
So you can add to your list:

1. The revolver has no critical, moving parts that are easily lost, rendering the gun useless.
 

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You can tell just by looking it's loaded, and needn't make ANY noise if in doubt.
No slide to pull to check chamber. Just look sideways (or possibly check a chamber by feel with pinky in low light).
Just one scenario.

AND, you don't need multiple safeties and other Rube Goldburg mechanisms to make it safe.
Transfer bar system is a great safety, and brings wheel guns into the modern age (no more empty cylinders under the hammer).

They seem accurate to me without "extra" work being done to "accurize" them.

They're #### for stout.

They'll eat almost any ammo you can fit into the chamber and still turn the cylinder. Don't matter if hollowpoint, wadcutter, whatever.
No ramp, no finicky clip mouth.

Can be downloaded without "cycling" problems from recoil springs too stiff for load.

They don't get mistakenly called "automatic weapons" on newscasts!

<!--emo&;)--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wink.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=';)'><!--endemo-->
 

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Not that I would do it, but if a revolver's action  was poured full of sand it could still be fired in emergency as long as you can force the hammer back.
Try that in a semi-auto.  Most won't work that good if they fall in the mud.----Survival type situation.
Have had a few semi-autos, love them at first then just get bored with them.  Then always want to get another one?<!--emo&???--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/confused.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt='???'><!--endemo-->?  
Short memory or something!!
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Can shoot 340gr. bullets at 1100 fps... comfortably... in a gun you can carry all day.
 

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Hey Guys,
Didn't Bob Milek or someone else over at G&A do a torture test between a revolver and a semi auto back in the 80's?  Seems I recalled during a simulated dust storm or something the revolver seized up and the auto kept on shooting.  That was just one test, but it turned out exactly the opposite of how I thought it would.
 

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If I were looking down the barrel of a gun and saw that full cylinder rotate around to the barrel it sure would make me see the light!!!!!

I don't remember that article about Milek but it wouldn't surprise me.  I will try to find that info.

Anyone out there want to donate a revolver and a semi-auto for me to do a non-bias test on???
 

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Sure Will,

I've got a cap&ball revolver for your test.
I'm sure it'll beat ANY blackpowder cap OR flint semi-auto ever made!
 

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"Bad Joke Friday" Dan (moderator emeritus)
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Speaking of Miculek and revolvers, he does say the revolver is easier to shoot accurately because of the grip angle. The grip on the revolver allows you to "lock" your wrist while the semi-auto with their 11 degree grip have the hand more upright, not allowing the wrist to lock.

Dan
 

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It's hard for me to believe this but it looks like I'll play the role of auto pistol defender. <!--emo&:0--><img src="http://beartoothbullets.com/iB_html/non-cgi/emoticons/wow.gif" border="0" valign="absmiddle" alt=':0'><!--endemo-->

First off let me say that I absolutely agree with just about everything that has been said so far in favor of the revolver. I'm a wheelgunner from way back. But the automatics do have some strongpoints.

Increased resistence to dirt and dust intrusion

The autos that fail in this regard are the ones with ultra-tight tolerances (think Luger) that choke on the finest grain of sand or open designs like the Beretta M9/92 that allow buckets of the stuff to make it into the inner workings. Contrast such guns with the issue-type 1911, a design that has been known to be partially rusted shut and still work. But even Old Slabsides can lose its fabled reliability when tightened and accurized into a match pistol.

Easier to Field Strip & Clean

When the guns do go down from excessive crud or a part breaks, any of the good auto pistol designs are much easier to detail strip, clean and repair than comparable revolvers. Taking the sideplate off of a revolver in the middle of a muddy foxhole without losing any parts would be tricky.

Easy Concealed Carry

When guns comparable in power and ease of shooting are examined, the automatic is easier and more comfortable to conceal than the revolver. A classic example would be a 1911 vs. a S&W M625-2. Both .45's and available with similar barrel lengths, at least at one time, but substantially different in weight and shape. I can personally vouch for the fact it is easier to pack a full size Colt Government than a round-butt, 3" N-frame.

Faster & More Precise Reloading

Let's not forget the impetus behind the automatic was from the old horse cavalry. They needed a handgun that could be easily fired and, more important, reloaded on horseback. This carries over today. Even when a wheelgunner practices a great deal, I doubt there are any who will say it is faster or easier to reload a sixgun than a selfloader. This is particularly true when things get "hairy" or when one is forced to move around a lot.

Now all that said, I can't remember when I last carried anything but a revolver mainly for the reasons others have already mentioned. Beyond a quality 1911-style pistol I can't see any selfloader that interests me beyond a few magazines bummed at the range.
 

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I really enjoy introducing young and new shooters to the shooting sports. I start them with a single shot 22 rifle. When they advance to a handgun, I want it to be a light-recoiling revolver, a 22 or target loaded 38. Fired single or double action, they have to make a deliberate attempt to make it go bang.
 

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The article involving Milek is true. He was advocating the revolver and another writer, that I can not remember, was preaching the auto. The revolver failed the sand test and the auto passed. A piece of sand got into the mechanisim of the DA revolver and locked it up. That said, make mine a revolver - they are just "better".
 

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twillis,
I think Milek would agree with you if he were with us today.  He continued to carry a revolver on most, if not all, of his backcountry hunting trips.  He seemed to be a fan of "space pistols (XP-100's and Wichita's)" but seemed like everytime saw a picture of him hunting, there was a revolver strapped to his side.  He was man enough to not let his personal preferences skew the test article and I do admire him for that.
 

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He was one of my all time favorites. It was a real shame when he passed away. I still remember the sheepish look on his face when the revolver jammed.

Terry
 

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I never had the opportunity to meet him or even correspond with him, but when he passed away, I remember a real hollow feeling inside.  My interest in handguns has developed over a long period of time and can't say that I always read or agreed with what he wrote.  Sure wish he was around now, though.  He always seemed to right what he knew, not what manufacturers wanted him to, I'm sure.

Seems like there were several constants in those pictures: a sweat-stained cowpuncher hat, shooting glasses, boots, jeans and a lit cigeratte.  That last one got him.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Man are you right on that.  I first started shooting and read books by Elmer Keith and Skeeter Skelton.  I have a magazine special with some of the writings of Skeeter it is date 1982.  I have his books and reread the stories all the time.  I always get something new from it... Loading .357 mag loads in 38 special cases, 13.5 of 2400 and laoded OAL to magnum length..
 

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Gentlemen,

I cut my teeth on revolvers, and still prefer them for feel, simplicity, and general shootability.  The U.S. Army has made it necessary for me to make the transition from revolvers to Auto's, and they can be quite insistant on what a man carries. Even then, until i recieved some advanced instruction on the fundementals of pistol markmanship, i always shot a revolver more ably.

These days, I shoot both autos and revolvers with roughly the same profiecency, although honestly i do practice more with my issue beretta and personal beretta then any other handgun, and expect that i will for a few more years until retirement.  I do have flings from time to time with other pistolas, but for the next few years at least, I will remain married to the beretta.

There are two instances where my old wheelguns always get the nod. The first is my well worn, butt ugly model 38 smith, that is worn year round in an ankle rig, and is my only armament off duty during the really hot and humid months.  The second is when i am going to be driving through some area of Indian country, for automobile defense i wear either a 2 1/2 ' mod 66, or a 2" model 12 smith, in a cross draw rig. They are very comfortble, don;t gouge me anywhere, and if i have to shoot behind me , over my shoulder while seated in the car, i don;t have to worry about limp wristing the weapon. During similiar drills with the beretta, glock, walther, H/K, and kimber, I have either had failures or were fanatically worried about them.  In one such attempt, a piece of 40 caliber brass bounced off my nose, which was not particularly bothersome, but a shade distracting.

So, two  great things about revlovers is that they can be discharged consistantly in an emergency without thought of firing grip, engagement angle, or fear of malfunction, and a brass won't hit you in the nose in extremely confined spaces.

One man's opinion.

Steve
 
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