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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Nickel plated brass isn't plated because it's "slicker", which is a byproduct of the plating, it's for corrosion resistance. Leave plain brass cartridges in leather gunbelt loops and they turn green.

ANnyways, polish to your hearts content with what suits you, I just don't like waiting lol

RJ
 

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Nickel plated brass isn't plated because it's "slicker", which is a byproduct of the plating, it's for corrosion resistance. Leave plain brass cartridges in leather gunbelt loops and they turn green.

ANnyways, polish to your hearts content with what suits you, I just don't like waiting lol

RJ
We're actually both right;
however, gunbelt loops is a non-issue for LEO's - since maybe Wyatt Earp, Pardner. ;)
"Why is nickel plated brass?
The reasons for choosing the nickel plated brass are quite a few. Nickel is more corrosion resistant than brass. It does not tarnish even if kept in a leather holster, unlike brass. The coefficient of friction is lower in nickel than brass. This allows easier sliding of the magazines on top of each other. The loading and unloading are also easier with the nickel plated ones

"
 

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The lubricity of nickel depends on the method of application. Standard electroplating causes the nickel to have less lubricity than the parent brass while electroless plating provides more lubricity and a more malleable result. The cracking and pealing nickel plating is electroplated.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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We're actually both right;
however, gunbelt loops is a non-issue for LEO's - since maybe Wyatt Earp, Pardner. ;)
"Why is nickel plated brass?
The reasons for choosing the nickel plated brass are quite a few. Nickel is more corrosion resistant than brass. It does not tarnish even if kept in a leather holster, unlike brass. The coefficient of friction is lower in nickel than brass. This allows easier sliding of the magazines on top of each other. The loading and unloading are also easier with the nickel plated ones

"

Seems like New Yorks Finest carried 38's (of various lengths, makes and models) for over a century. Extra ammo was carried in belt loops.

But anyway, nickel plated is, uh, erh, uhm, hmmm, pretty ! Yeah, its pretty.

RJ
 
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My Olsens dry tumbler I've had for 35 yrs just quit. First the counter balance came loose so I spot welded it back on. It have an epoxy on it before. After that it ran for a few hours and the weld broke. Epoxied it cause I didn't want to get the welder out again, and then it stopped working.

With power on it just hums and the the shaft is resisting to turn when I try to spin it. I suspect the motor has to be replaced, but I can 't find the same motor available anywhere.

I see one of these old tumblers just sold on eBay for $45 + $25 shipping. Midsouth has a larger tumbler for only $54 + $10 shipping. I'll probably go that route.

I just use it to take lube off cases before loading and polishing with a little Nufinish to inhibit the brass from tarnishing over time. Otherwise I use a FART to wet tumble after decapping cases on a Lee APP. The APP is very fast with the case feed attached. Getting the pockets clean before loading has helped save many primers over the years.

So which is best? I'd get both if you have the funds. If not, probably a dry tumbler, but it won't get the primer pockets very clean by itself.

To help there, you decap and wash the cases in a bucket of water with lemishine/soap to get the dirt off and clean the insides and pockets. Just rinse well and dry in a towel to get the water off before tossing them in the dry media.

It helps tremendously to get the pockets and inside clean and remove tarnish, plus the media doesn't get dirty as fast. When I first did this I used a solution made to clean medical instruments I had around from work. It had some type of mild acid and detergent in it which removed the tarnish and dirt. Cases came out bright and shiny after a bath in the stuff.

After rinising well put them in the dry media tumbler. If the cases are too wet when they go in it cakes on the inside and flash hole. This happens the most with corncob media. With bottle neck cases I dry them first because of this. I also run the dry tumbler with the top off so moisture can evaporate.
 

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I love the way that some look down their nose at others because they do things differently than they do. I really could care less if you shoot the dirtiest brass on the planet or want it so shiny that it hurts your eyes.

Why must cleaning brass threads bring out the worst in people. I first starting cleaning because I could get a few cents more per piece back in the day. Now I do it because I like it and it's what I am used to.

Good luck and all the best.
 

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i went to wet tumbling because i was sick of buying media and it was stuck in primer pocket hole.
 
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