Shooters Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
37 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have used a Coleman stove to melt lead for my sinkers and .490 round balls for my TC muzzleloader. Not much experience but a start. I reload .38, .357, 9mm, and will start on 44 mag. I only shoot paper and steel targets with the pistols. I am considering casting the .44's. Is it necessary to size the bullets after casting? All of my equipment is RCBS. I see that RCBS makes a sizer/lubricator for about $110. Is there any type of sizer die that will attach to my RBCS Jr. press to allow the sizing and lubricating of bullets? Investing in a lead furnace and thermometer would be useful for the sinkers and round balls, but I'm having problems justifying the cost of $110 for the sizer/lubricator. (Actually justifying this cost to the wife). Thanks for your input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,644 Posts
You dont really need a lot of equipment to get started casting. You already have a stove and a lead pot. I suggest a Lyman or RCBS dipper. Try a Lee mold in .38 caliber. If you try a plain base bullet you can lube by hand or use Lee tumble lube. I have a Lyman 450 lubricator sizer and I still lube many bullets by hand. I like the Lee push through bullet sizers also.
Probably the first piece of equipment you should get is the Lyman Cast Bullet Handbook. Mid South has it at a very good price, as does Midway and others. Go to the Lee web site and look at the mold, lead pot and push through sizer instructions, you will learn quite a bit - quickly.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,375 Posts
Carroll,

You asked about sizing and using your existing RCBS loading press. Actually one of the best options for someone on a casting budget is to invest in one of the Lee Precision bullet sizing kits. It's a die that screws into your loading press, with a puch that fits into the ram on your press as a shell-holder would. It's a very good tool that sizes the bullets nose first which avoids much of the problems associated with mis-aligned nose punches on the RCBS and Lyman type lubrisizers, and the whole kit from Lee Precision is under fifteen bucks! Either use their liquid alox, or hand lube with a quality bullet lubricant, then size with their sizing kit. By the way it's an excellent system if using gas checked bullets as the gas check is seated while the bullet is sized eliminating a secondary step as with the lyman or RCBS sizers.

If the proper sizing diameter isn't available from Lee Precision, a custom made sizing die is available for 25.00 direct from Lee, but the easiest solution is to use an undersize die, and lap it out to your desired diameter.

Hope this helps,

God Bless,

Marshall
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Lee offers a line of Micro Groove molds that do not require sizing. You cast the bullets, lube them with Lee Liquid Alox and shoot them. I have had excellent results with them in 41Mag and 40ACP at pistol velocities up to 1000fps. I also use regular Lee 45ACP bullets unsized, lubed with Lee Liquid Alox, In my 45 Auto. I use WW with about 1% tin for metal. This would allow you to start without a large expenditure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
In revolvers generally if the loaded cartidge will chamber you will not need to size it. I have several lyman moulds that drop bullets that are a little large for the barrel but fit the chamber just fine. There are some people who have told me to slug the cylinders of the revolver and size to that. Holds down leading. Oversized bullets rarely lead. Undersized bullets however will. For a fact you need the Lyman cast bullet handbook. If your not in a hurry you can usually get one in pretty good condition at ebay or one of the other auction houses and save some bucks. MIght look there first. Good luck with your casting. Try not to get disgusted. It really is quite enjoyable after you get the hang of it.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top