Shooters Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone been out bird hunting here in Colorado? My wife and I have been out 4 times now and we barely got enough for a meal! We are hunting some old haunts that have always produced. Two years ago I got 17 on one day (mostly Eurasians) but this year hardly any. I know that weather has been mild which will not drive down huge flocks from the north but now its getting half way thru Sept. Anyone having the same problems? What has got me confused is I see tons of Eurasians around town and I don't think they do any migrating so whats up?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,655 Posts
I'm in S. Idaho and had a frost on Aug 30. Season opened Sept. 1st and nothing but the nasty, local Eurasians were left. I assumed they went to Az. Maybe not.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,794 Posts
There are a fair number of doves here, yes. :)
The Eurasians are absolutely _everywhere_ though... :(
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,655 Posts
"Collared" doves come from Cyprus, I think. They showed up here six years ago. Bigger than a Mourning Dove with a dark ring around his neck. They aren't migratory and hang around anywhere grain is handled or spilled. The meat is dark and strong but they can be a sporting target in a sparrow kind of way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,641 Posts
The Eurasian Collared Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) is an "invasive" species that has become common in suburbs and around farms in Colorado. Colorado has no bag limit or season on it. It's slightly larger than a Mourning Dove. There is some concern, unwarranted in my opinion, about it's potential effect on the native Mourning Doves. It appears to be an excellent game bird and should probably not be disliked any more than the "invasive" Ring-necked Pheasant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Yes Eurasions (collared) are taking over the mourning dove habitat and spreading at an alarming rate. They are usually not as fast and larger. They make a lot of racket in town and are becoming pests. I dont think they do much migrating and love hanging out in town. They taste about like squab. Mournings are superior in most respects and flock in larger groups. There is no limit or season on them. (Collards)They make good practice.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,655 Posts
When I first ran across the Eurasions, I thought I was hearing White Wings.
In this area, Mourning Doves and Eurasions are mixed in together and nest in the same trees. Both supply food for the Red Tails that regularly scoop up young doves.
There is no limit and no season here so now, anything that flies in a dairy or feed lot is open season and no limit. Eurasions, starlings, English sparrows, pigeons and crows are all open.
 

·
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
Joined
·
23,987 Posts
Same in Arizona - no closed season or bag limit on the Collared dove. Make a sound like a crow with a sore throat!

The whitewing dove is here in abundance during the late spring and most of summer, then head south around the 1st of September when season opens. Now, the Mourning and Inca (rock) dove are at the feeders in the back yard.

Used to hear lots of shooting, especially around the dairy farms, but with the encroachment of housing developments, hear nary a shot anymore. I don't hunt them because they are the state bird of Indiana, my wife's home state and she is protective of them. ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,655 Posts
I'll paraphrase Robert Ruark who said it about Bobwhites, 'I've shot my share of lions, tigers and elephants and now enjoy others hunting those species, but when it comes to [doves], I'm a murderous ***!'

I grew up with doves in N. Fla. having three seasons and very liberal limits (that were never obeyed). Cuba and C. America poisoned them just after they left us so why not shoot 300 a day when the migratory flocks built up on the barrier islands? "Dove Derbys" in the '70s were a hundred dollar buy-in which gave you a case of 500 shells and a water boy/retriever. I won one derby with 368/500 and a pot of just over $700. I LOVE to shoot doves, but that kind of shooting is now reserved for Argentina.
I've been a guide on hunts in the Arkansas River valley around Rocky Ford and LaJunta that rivaled anything I've seen south of the border, but game wardens are too thick to really get into it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,652 Posts
Thanks for the info. It looks like you have the same collared doves as we have here. I have half a dozen who are almost tame and frequent our yard and feeder. We have a covered(mesh) feeder for the small birds. A local farm used to have a hundred or so around the buildings and prior to a pheasant hunt we would circle the buildings and have a 'beater' walk around flapping a plastic bag. Not many doves resulted but lots of empty cases. I'll see if I can get a photo and you can confirm. Never eaten one but being corn eaters they should taste good.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,655 Posts
but being corn eaters they should taste good.

I don't know about that! I ate many English sparrows as a kid roasted near featherless over a pine knot fire. It's hard to get that hungry these days. ;)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sus Scrofa

·
The Shadow
Joined
·
7,571 Posts
SE Wa. Has so many doves that they stretched the season from a few weeks to a full month-ish. And yes, they want every collard dove you can find shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,641 Posts
Here's a photo
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,655 Posts
I had two hatchings of M. Doves this year, but they flew away in the middle of the night. Maybe they heard the Ponsess-Warren shot shell reloader crank out he first #9.....

I grew up with Doves and Bobwhite quail the only 'dry land' game birds. Turkeys were 'big game and Snipe was thought to be a Boy Scout joke. Waterfowlers were thought just a little nuts.

I shot skeet and live pigeons for a while and even got sponsored as a Sporting Clay shooter, but I still consider 'personal best' as occurring in a dove field. 25/25 with a 28 ga. is still the best I've ever done, but a limit of 12 in 8 minutes and two limits of 12 with 25 shots are pretty close.

That's the bird, Irv. Square tail instead of tapered and the tail has a white tip. The Mourning dove is much more streamlined and fast
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,860 Posts
I brine my doves and the collared birds eat about the same as the others. Our opener here was a bit weak, but I went out this evening and had a thick and fast flight for about 45 minutes. I started out 3/3 on the first group and felt pretty cocky, but settled into about 60% before long. I got the old Ithaca pump out for grins and it still works pretty well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Sus Scrofa

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,652 Posts
Here's a photo
Yep, same bird. I have five or six which under normal circumstances almost land on my head when I put feed out for the birds in the garden. Produce a camera and they all cleared off:eek::D

They flew here across the English Channel having spread up across Europe. We get a migratory turtle dove occasionally, but otherwise this little bird is the only true wild dove we have and is a welcome asset to our list of game birds.

Jack, you should come to the UK sometime and try driven snipe. We have a hotel down in Devon who specialise in driven snipe days and they can be very testing shooting.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top