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Hey,

I have rights, not exclusive but close, to hunt about 150 acres in binghamton new york. its shotgun country over there, and I need to get equipped. I've heard a good muzzleloader can be had for not too much, a T/C or CVA.

I would like people's opinions on muzzleloaders in the 300 or less price range. I would also like to know how people feel about muzzleloaders vs. a rifled slug gun. Which is worse on recoil? How about general accuracy?

~ John
 

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Hey,

I have rights, not exclusive but close, to hunt about 150 acres in binghamton new york. its shotgun country over there, and I need to get equipped. I've heard a good muzzleloader can be had for not too much, a T/C or CVA.

I would like people's opinions on muzzleloaders in the 300 or less price range. I would also like to know how people feel about muzzleloaders vs. a rifled slug gun. Which is worse on recoil? How about general accuracy?

~ John
The T/C Impact fits that price range. I handled one the other day and was real impressed with it. So impressed I got out of the store before I ended up taking it home for $249.99 . I know some members on other forums do not like the Impact, but they might be CVA fans. I really liked the fit and feel of the rifle.

Another rifle currently on sale is the CVA Optima and Accura. The Optima has a stainless steel barrel and quick release breech plug. It would be an excellent rifle with that Bergra barrel on it. The Accura is a blue/black model, but still an excellent rifle. It is the older model though and does not have the quick release.

AS for recoil, the more powder and weight of projectile used, the more recoil you will get. I compare recoil like a mild shotgun, but I am not recoil sensitive and I do not shoot magnum loads. Besides, its more a push then a kick IMO. In a shotgun only country I would take a scoped muzzleloader any day of the week over a shotgun. You might get only one shot, but when you find the right load, that is one accurate, powerful shot.
 

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I'm going to dissent and suggest that you go with a traditional muzzle loader, which can be found used around $300, sometimes less. Look for a Lyman Trade Rifle in .54, caplock. Even brand new these can be purchased for $350, and with the 1:48 rate of twist they will accomodate both patched round ball as well as moderately heavy conicals equally well in most cases, giving you enough power and killing power to take down mosy anything you are likely to encounter. Recoil is very manageable being that they are a well built rifle. Good used side-locks in your general price range include the Lyman Great Plains rifle, T/C & Cabelas Hawken types in .50 & .54. as well as the New Englander and CVA Mountain rifle, you just have to look around.

Do yourself a favor, buy a real muzzle loader, avoid those plastic excuse inlines. No offense to anyone intended, I just don't like inlines.
 

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I have both and enjoy both. I will say though, if you want to shoot magnum level loads, go inline. The actions are weaker on the older designs and you get a lot more "smoke in the face" too. I personally carry a compact Traditions Buckstalker now for my inline for deer hunting. I don't personally like sabot rounds particularly well, so I go with the Great Plains bullets in the 385 gr. variety. They will knock down just about anything on the continent. They are less than perfect on Elk, Moose and Grizzley, or at least there are better choices, but very accurate and terrific on deer. They do kick a bit more than other things I've fired. I like the newer Traditions bullet starting area in the end of their in lines and it helps get the big conicals started squarely to the bore. I also have a .50 Hawken side lock and shoot it mainly with round ball. It's a 1 in 48 twist and works well out to 75 yards. It's a pretty gun and I love it for aesthetic reasons primarily. It does handle the big conicals ok, although it doesn't get as good of accuracy for me anyway. The really cool looking stock will HURT you though, if you don't get it pulled tight. I started using a slip-on Limbsaver small recoil pad when shooting it after those points caught me just a little off in the shoulder.

Edit***

I personally carry a .50 Cal Kentucky pistol with a 10-1/2" barrel also in crossdraw fashion. I like being able to carry a quick back-up to finish off a wounded deer and trying to ram a conical quickly down the bore is tough. 8)
 

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JG, looks like you asked a muzzleloader forum and got a muzzleloader answer. All good suggestions, BUT, the new rifled bbl shotguns with saboted slugs are very accurate at 25 to 75 yd range. Probably the shotgun will cost more, but you can use it for lots of hunting. Muzzleloading requires a certain amount of unique "gear" even to do the basics, plus load development, etc. So if you just want to take a gun and go hunt deer, maybe a rifled slug gun would be easier.
I shoot BP and would take my Renegade with the GMB and a patched RB, but then, I shoot a lot, mostly BP guns, and I have all the "stuff".
Just something to think about
OBTW, I came from that area, great deer hunting, great country, enjoy your time there.
 

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You can't go wrong with either TC or CVA, I own both. 2 TC Endeavors and 1 CVA Accura. The CVA was my first Muzzleloader, and might come closer to fitting your price range.

As far as using them in New York, I live in the very western corner of NY, west of Jamestown, and have been using ML for reg deer season for the past 2 years. IMO they are more accurate than an off the shelf slug gun, and it wont cost you $3-$5 per shot. 90% of the time you only get 1 shot @ the deer anyway, make it count. With a little practice, and load development you will have yourself a fine ML that can take down any animal you would be likely to encounter aroung Binghamton. Best of luck.
 

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Here's What I Use

I shoot a Traditions Buckstalker .50 cal. with a cheapy 3-9X40 scope. I'm using 2 50 gr. 777 pellets and the Hornady 250 gr. High Speed - Low Drag sabot. With this set-up I can shoot 1" groups @ 100 yards. The gun alone only cost $150 brand new. The entire outfit cost me less than $300. The gun is light, simple to use and clean, and very accurate. I'd recommend it to anyone.
 

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Its all about the journey I guess.

I switched to blackpowder 3 years ago, and I probably wont go back to shotguns.
I think blackpowder is for the thinking hunter.
I take a great amount of pride in shooting a muzzleloader because of what its taught me about firearm ballistics.
Blackpowder shooting isnt for everyone, its a sport which chooses its members, not the otherway around.
It will frustrate the daylights out of you if your not the right type of person for it.
But give it a chance, it may be very rewarding for you.

I like to know how things work, and shotgun hunting didnt let me contribute enough to the equation to satisfy me, Its just load the shell and shoot.

I grew up hunting with an old mossberg bolt action .410 and killed alot of deer with it, so not taking away from shotguns.
Blackpowder requires some effort, alot like archery.
 

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Traditions Tracker

I got the .50 cal Traditions Tracker for $190 out the door. It was the best deal I ever got on a ML.
It's accurate and reliable. I love the nickel plated barrel and bold styling lines on the black synthetick stock. When I'm holding it, I feel like I'm dreaming!

PS.

You always go traditional and get the .50 cal. Traditions Frontier at about $290
 
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