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Discussion Starter #1
I have been reloading for a couple of years now with an an RCBS single stage. I would like to move up to a progressive for my pistol reloading. I keep hearing about how good Dillon is, but are there any other brands that would work well for my needs that are not as expensive? I have standerd Lee reloading dies and will need to use them.
 

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Either Dillion or Honady Lock N Load - You can't really say one is better - they both good.
 

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Also matters what rounds you intend to reload. If you have just one, the Dillon Square Deal is a great deal. It is limited in that it uses only a special size Dillon die, and not the usual 7/8-14 thread dies. The other Dillons use regular dies.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I will be reloading: .380 - 9mm - .38/357 - .44 - .45ACP and I have the dies for them. So far it appears that theres 1 vote for Hornady and 1 for Dillon. If the cost of the equipment is reasonably close I would like to go for the Dillon; I just wanted to get a feel for other equipment on the market as I know nothing about progressives.
 

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I went the LnL route but would/will go Dillon if the price was lower and or the right used one comes along.
One cannot have too many presses or gun toys, can one!
Have had 0 problems with LnL and loaded well past 10k on it so far.
Load for 380, 9mm, 38, 357, 44 and 45
Both Dillon and LnL can use lee dies although in certain instances you may choose to use their specific die for a specific caliber or application.

Don't think there is a wrong choice here-very strong feeling among some for their choice but doubt you will go wrong with either.

Gary
 

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Would normally suggest purchasing new but if you are on a budget: Consider purchasing used (e.g. eBay) and made by a company that offers a strong lifetime warranty. That way, should anything go wrong or need servicing, you'll be covered. I'm on a budget too and get most of my reloading gear that way.
 

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I've got 2 of the Lee Pro1000's. One in 40S&W and one in 45ACP. They work great for me. I don't shoot competitively, but the one for 40 S&W has loaded a couple thousand by now and it seems to be holding up very well.

The Lee Pro1000 takes 7/8X14 dies also, so you can change dies and shell plates and primer sizes, but at $160 per press set up to load a certain caliber, by the time you buy dies and shell plates and primer trays, then change over all the stuff, you just paid for another press.

My two cents.

RJ
 

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The reason I love my Dillon 550 is that I reload 14 different calibers (yes I said 14) I have not had any experiance with other progresive presses but when I was looking for the press I had an old guy that I really respected tell me Dillon . when I called Dillon I was all set to buy the 650 and Dillon asked what I planed on doing with the press and after that he talked me into the cheaper 550. He told me that I would be more happy with it and that it would be cheaper for the conversions. I never looked back. Dillon's customer service is some of the best I have ever worked with. I know I sound like there commercial but no I do not work for them. I love there products and there customer service and if I ever need another press I will get another Dillon.
 

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+1 for Dillon XL650
Had mine for 20+ years with only 2 problems (both my fault)
Dillon fixed me up fast at no cost
I LUV DILLON
 

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reloading on a progressive press.

I,ve been loading since '71. I've tried all kinds of presses be they singlestage, turret, progressive, or hand dies. My Lyman turret is 68 years old. I tried the Dillon 550 and it works just fine. Hornady is the same quality, but i like it better because the shellplates seem to operate smoother. the LEE Pro 1000 works fine and costs about one half of the other two. Its junky looking but works fine. But time and time again I keep returning to my turrets, I guess i'm just built backwards or something. I wish one of you would invent a Lock-N-Load turret press because I'd buy five of them!
 

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Invicta39,
Dillon makes a good press but it uses proprietary dies and the cost is substantial. Yes, they have a very good warranty.

You might consider looking at the Lee Classic Turret. Its a cast press that uses Lee or any other 7/8ths by 14 TPI dies and it does a very good job with everything from .22 Hornet to .416 Rigby. I know cause I have one.
I use mine for reloading handgun ammo. .357 Magnum, .45 Colt and .30 Carbine.
I have used it to reload most my other rifle calibers so I would know exactly what it can do.

You can run it as a single stage press or as a turret press just by removing the indexing rod so the turret doesnt turn with each time the lever returns to full up position.

Check out the Lee Precision website. They even have videos on set up and running the press.

If you already have your dies sets, you just need a turret, the press, a powder riser and autodisk powder measure to begin loading sine you have already been reloading and should have a scale and case length gauge tools. The press should run you roughly $100, the turret for each caliber runs about $10, and the riser runs about $9, the autodisk powder measure runs about $25.

Neat thing is you can unscrew the riser from the Lee powder thru expanding die that comes with the Lee pistol dies and then screw it into the next caliber PTED and go right on loading after reseting your charge volume.

Ive got my turret heads set up with individual risers and powder measures so I dont have to dink with it like that though.

Its a very good press and system and wont cost an arm and a leg.
 

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I'll put in my vote too for the Dillon 550. I haven't used any other progressive, but their customer service is first rate. And it uses standard dies. Currently I'm useing Lee, Hornady, and RCBS dies in mine. Keep your eyes open for deals, I got mine, a Hornady Turret press, Doubles of all the tool heads and powder measures, and 10 sets of dies for $350. I've heard good things about Lee stuff too. Especially for the price.
 

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Dillion...............
 

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Cool on the 7/8ths by 14 TPI threads in the Dillon. I hadnt seen that on the one I played with.

If you are gonna shoot 1000 rounds per pistol caliber a month then Dillon is your best bet.

How simple is it to use a Dillon for reloading rifle ammo single stage?
 

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For the 550B it is easy. It is manually indexed, so just don't flip the indexing tab when you want to put a case in and out for sizing, then trimming and cleaning, then finishing loading. It has little brass buttons with stems at each station that constrain the case rim in the shell holder as they pass the station during progressive loading. You can remove any of these buttons to start a case at a later station for priming, charging, seating, or crimping. You can, obviously, skip any step you don't need to take the same way.
 

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Rifle loading requires more flexibility in reloading steps than does pistol reloading. Different dies, powders, bullets, seating depths, etc. are often used in rifle reloading. Progressive pistol reloading is often more about cranking out mind-numbing quantities of exactly the same load with minimal effort.

The Dillon 550 is better suited than the 650 to rifle reloading for reasons already addressed, but the LNL AP is better suited than both.

The LNL AP has a PM that is better suited to rifle powders than the Dillon PM. Pre-set metering inserts can be changed with the push of a button, without having to empty the PM. And if/when you need to change powders, the LNL PM drain allows you do do that without tools and without having to remove the PM from the press.

The LNL PM can be used at stations other than the 2nd station, unlike Dillon 550/650. This allows more than one die prior to loading powder. You could have a neck size and a shoulder bump die, and/or a case lube die, separate expander die, etc. The extra station on the LNL may come in handy here.

Removing/replacing individual dies and tools is much easier on the LNL AP; a simple 1/6th turn and the die pops out. This also allows auto-indexed single stage reloading (even with the case feeder), since all you have to do is remove the dies/tools that you do not want to use for that operation. The press automatically moves the brass from the case feeder (if you have one), through the station you are using, and into a bin for you. And if you need to manually remove or replace a cartridge, you don't have to fumble with little brass buttons, just pull the little coil spring down and remove/insert the case.

Like the 550, the LNL AP primer feed only dispenses a new primer when needed. The 650 dispenses one for every pull of the handle, so it cannot be used for turret style reloading (one cartridge, start to complete, at a time on the press) like the 550 and LNL can.

If money is no object, and you shoot a lot of military brass with crimped primers, the Dillon 1050 is great, with primer pocket swaging built in, but at a price that would pay for 2-3 really nice 650 or LNL AP presses with all the trimmings.

Andy
 
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