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I have a buddy whos dad owns two model 94s. One is from 1965(serial 28xxxxx) and one from (I'm assuming 1994) serial 60xxxxx. They are both in excellent condition and havent had a large amount of rounds through them. My dilemma is that one is a Model 94 Ranger 100 year version. On the right of the receiver, it says 1894- 1994 and has NO engraving. This one has a scope already and a sling included. The other is from 1965, not a Ranger, and is in really great shape, but comes with nothing extra. I was told by the seller that to put a scope on, if I wanted, I would need a side mount of some sort since the top is not tapped for scope mounts.

Which one should I get? Both are in almost the same shape as far as wear and tear goes and I can get them for more than likely right around the same price. Which one would you get and why? Thanks!
 

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Engraving means nothing to me and as far as it being an anniversary model, Winchester is still whipping that dead horse. They have made way too many "collector" editions to have any meaning at all. I recently purchased a 125th Anniversary model High Wall with gold lettering and some "engraving" (rolled stamping) and put a scope on it and I hunt with it. It's a great hunting gun and probably has no extra value for being a "special edition". If I were you, I'd get the one with the scope if you want a scope on that gun. I wouldn't pay any extra for the scope if it was a really cheap scope. It it's a decent scope and you like it, it might be worth a few extra bucks. Me? I'd get the one with the scope simply because it's drilled and tapped for one. Oh yeah, welcome to the forum. I see this is your first post here. Make sure you let us know what you decided and how it shoots.
 

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That's a no brainer. Buy the newer model 1894-1994 gun, which is not a commemorative but just recognition of one hundred years production. Only the first half of 1994 production or about 45,000 rifles of all model were so marked. The 1994 rifle was made of far better material and workmanship.

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Discussion Starter #4
I figured that since its a post-1964 it would be more worth it to buy the newer one, simply because its newer. The scope isnt a high $$$ scope but its decent enough, so theres another reason. How much should I pay? I'm thinking that I should start at $300 and work my way up from there

And just out of curiosity, why is it that a pre-1964 model 94 is worth so much more?
 

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Which one should I get? Both are in almost the same shape as far as wear and tear goes and I can get them for more than likely right around the same price. Which one would you get and why? Thanks!
I recently picked up a M94/1969 Safe Queen. It came with a side mount, and an ungodly 3X-9X scope. (I bought it from an old timer we help out with firewood, and when he drives off the road after a trip to town. :)

The side mount is at best, an abomination, (Obamanation?). Cost me about $10 to replace the parts and get rid of the mount.

If you need a scope, get the angle eject model.

If you are OK with a peep, or the original irons, buy the older rifle. I put an older steel Lyman peep on mine, I have a M336 .30-30 I can scope if I need to.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
TMan, i dont necessarily need a scope but it would be nice to have. I plan on using it for killing hogs out at the same buddys land and going hunting for some shorter range game with it. I think since the older one needs a special side mount, it would be cheaper to buy one set up and ready to go since I can always pull the scope if i dont like it. Thanks for your input! Im definitely going to try to get the newer one
 

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I think since the older one needs a special side mount, it would be cheaper to buy one set up and ready to go since I can always pull the scope if i dont like it.
Actually, I didn't tell the whole truth. The side mount doesn't sit directly over the center of the receiver, but off to the left of center, to allow ejected cases to clear. The position isn't exactly "natural" for quick target acquisition, and the point of impact meets at the distance you sighted in at. At all other distances you are either right of where you aim, or left.

You need the newer rifle ;)
 

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M94AE - +3

The angle-ejecct's receiver is blued forged steel, just like the pre-64's, and not one of a coated (only looks like bluing) sintered metal - MUCH easier to refinish traditionally if/when it ever should need it.

(The sintered receivers tend to shed their finish fairly quickly, and/or rust/pit easily.)


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Pre 64 is a better made gun. Machined parts. If you drill it for a scope you hurt the value. If you want to scope it,buy the newer one. You can beat that up and cant hurt what will never have any collector value. Stamped parts.
 

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"........never have any collector value." :D:D:D

When I was a kid (early 50's) I was in a hardware store, they sold guns in those days, and noticed a whiskey barrel full of old guns. The barrel contained Winchester '73's, 76's, and 86's along with some single shots, probably 1885's and others. Store owner said that they "never would have any collector value" and was selling them at.....Your choice, $10 each. A new '94 carbine was $64.95.

Oh yes, I know a number of collectors who collect the late model Trappers and Big Bore models.

:eek:
 

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I bought a 94 Ranger about a year ago. Rangers were produced for "big box" type stores and were considered lower end rifles. The only real difference is they have a hardwood stock rather than walnut. Inside there is little real difference. I think from the mid sixties for a few years some parts were cheapened to save cost but it wasn't long till that was changed and better quality parts were used again.

These guys are right the post 64 guns are worth about half of what pre 64 are. I paid $350 for a cherry late 80's Ranger in 30-30. It shoots great and is accurate. It might not be a collector piece but whoever in my family that gets it some day probably won't care.
 

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Winchester 94's

I'm with Cowpoke. Levers were intended as light weight, easy carrying (in hand or saddle), fast handling & for relatively close range. A scope totally changes the whole appearance & ruins those fine charecteristics. If you need a scope for longer range/whatever, you may as well use a bolt action. short action carbine bolts can actually be shorter/lighter than a lever, but still don't carry as easy. Unless you plan on hunting from a stand, IMO a scope for hogs can be a hinderance if you are in thick brush/ rain/ wading thru swamps, where a slip/ fall is common. My mdl 94 big bore xtr is in 375 cal top eject, & a set of adjustable millet open sights are cheap, orange front ramp & white outline rear are easy to see & I've made my longest shot with it, under 100 yds.
 

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The new ones will never bring what the old ones will. They are always older. Check what 73s.76s and 86s bring compared to even old 94s.
:D You are correct, the newer one's will never equal the older one's in value. You said that the newer one's would never have any collector value...with that I disagree.
 

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Every time I see a Marlin, Winchester, Rossi or what have you with a scope on it....I just cringe all over. I turn my head real quick hoping it will go away. Its a lot like a '32 Ford coupe.....with a SBC in it...just aint right. lol
 

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M94AE - +3

The angle-ejecct's receiver is blued forged steel, just like the pre-64's, and not one of a coated (only looks like bluing) sintered metal - MUCH easier to refinish traditionally if/when it ever should need it.

(The sintered receivers tend to shed their finish fairly quickly, and/or rust/pit easily.)


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This defies my thoughts on what "sintered" means. Exactly what is a "sintered receiver."? Not arguing, just want to know.
 

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This defies my thoughts on what "sintered" means. Exactly what is a "sintered receiver."? Not arguing, just want to know.
It a process of using powdered metal (often recycled steels) to form parts. The powdered steel is pressed under high pressure into a mold of the desired shape, then heated to a temperature just below melting point to fuse the powder and form the part. Sintering is a common method of forming parts and much less expensive than machining from solid steel. The disadvantage is that purity is difficult to control if recycled steel is used. Those impurities along with high nickel content made most sintered metal impossible to hold a nice finish or hold a bluing well.

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