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First, the .41 mag is not dead, although it has more of a cult following. I have 5 guns in .41, 2 lever action Marlins, a Ruger Bisley, Ruger Bisley hunter and a Taurus Total Titanium Tracker. They are all shooters. I've even cut some cases down to .44 special length to make .41 specials which make the very light weight Tracker a pleasure to shoot. In fact my next project is to convert a Ruger Deerfield 44mag carbine to .41 mag.
 

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Charter Arms introduced the Mag Pug this year in .41 Mag.


CD
 

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Henry offers a steel lever action in 41 magnum and ammo choices continue to grow.

I would say the 41mag is the gun people choose when you actually know things about guns and cartridges.
 
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Since I've previously posted I've acquired a Ruger Blackhawk in 41 Mag and I'm seriously considering a Henry in this chambering too, have the Henry in 327 so I'm familiar with that platform.
The 41 Magnum won't die out on my bench until I die out!
 

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AFAIC, the 41 Magnum will never die out! I have two, a blued Ruger® 6½" Blackhawk® and a stainless 4" Taurus® TRACKER™ trail gun and am on the search for a couple more.
 

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Not dead at my house, 400-1000 rounds a month.

More firearms to shoot it from than there ever has been at any point in it's existance.
 

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But it did answer a question that people asked: What is more powerful than a 357 magnum but has less recoil than a 44 magnum? If the ammo companies had come out with 41 special loads, like a 180-200 grain bullet at 900 fps, it would have been a lot more popular. It was and is still a wonderful cartridge for the reloader.
 

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But it did answer a question that people asked: What is more powerful than a 357 magnum but has less recoil than a 44 magnum? If the ammo companies had come out with 41 special loads, like a 180-200 grain bullet at 900 fps, it would have been a lot more popular. It was and is still a wonderful cartridge for the reloader.
I bought a bunch of 41 Special brass for my 657 Mountain Gun, makes it a pretty versatile 'combination handgun'. That brass also keeps the long bullets inside the cylinder!
 

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Good Mornng Back Mamba,

I bought a 4" 586 in the early '80's. It was an on-duty gun. I'm also a big game hunter who has hunted in deep Rocky Mountain wildernesses in which griz dominated. So I got to thinking, which is an activity for which I have a short rap sheet, that 5 .41 Mag rounds in an "L" Frame would make an excellent wilderness handgun. So I wrote to S&W (Smith-Corona typewriter) asking it to consider a 5-shot L-Frame .41 Rem Mag. I must've raised ire of really important operatives of S&W because it never acknowledged my entreaty.

Then I got to thinkin' some more, which added another entry to my thought rap sheet, which is still on the short side. Would 6 180 grain .357 Mag rounds be a better way to go than 5 .41 Rem Mag rounds? I do not know the answer. What I do know is big cartridges produce big recoil, which is opposite of advantageous were a mean critter to take to a notion of including me on its dining menu.

Here's my conclusion, which might be worth slightly more that my losing NFL playoff predictions: the .357 Mag revolver is the most powerful revolver that most hand gunners can tame. What I mean is a dude who's proficient with a 4" .357 Mag handgun can fire 6 accurate, magnum rounds. I've fired an S&W .41 Mag revolver. I ain't recoil averse. Recoil forced the gun's muzzle off target, which is a very bad thing if a target were a mean critter intending mean critter things.

The most powerful revolver I can rapidly fire w/o muzzle leaving silhouette is the .357 Mag. Hence, the rhetorical question: would 6 rapidly fired and reasonably accurate 180 grain .357 Mag rounds be better that 6 .41 Rem Mag rounds if we were to consider recoil taking muzzle of the latter off target causing loss of sight picture thus forcing its user into the tactical disadvantage of reacquiring sight picture?

I'm good with 6 180 grain .357 Mag rounds. But were I to take another stab and wilderness defense, I'd almost assuredly go with a 1911-A1 chambered for the 10MM. According to EMP 3's handgun carrying opinion, which ain't yet been acclaimed ;-) the 1911-A1 has exceeded ease of carry excellence, is lightning fast to battery, is infinitely faster to reload than a revolver, and, of critical importance, one can keep a 1911-A1's muzzle pointed at a threat and his eyes on a threat while reloading it. Muzzle and eyes on target are life saving tactical advantages.

I'll leave you with another rhetorical question: why ain't a likeness of John Browning holding a 1911 on Mt Rushmore???
 

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I contend that anything a 180 gr 357 bullet can do, a 180 gr 41 bullet can do better. It can easily be fired at the same velocity as the 357, and with less pressure, muzzle flash and blast and equal accuracy. It also makes a significantly bigger hole in the target. Choose your bullet construction to choose your level of penetration. The extra shot with the 357 is a moot point with grizz: you won't get off more than 3 anyway, so make 'em good!
 

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I contend that anything a 180 gr 357 bullet can do, a 180 gr 41 bullet can do better.
That goes without saying. And anything a .41 can do, a .44 can do better, > .454 > .500.

In parts of the country where grizzlies are actually a problem, the last two are considered a minimum by the guys that live and work outdoors, and need a firearm to remain safe. Last year while I was hunting in WY, a guide was killed while tending a hunters game animal, (after they emptied their pepper spray).

Grizzly encounters are fairly common in the Rockies, and some are serious about taking your deer or elk. Easy to back away from that, but apparently backing away is not always a solution. Think "bigger" if you are hoping a handgun might be needed, or get really good on fast moving targets at close range, good enough to shoot 'em in the eye. I'm a huge .357 fan, but I wouldn't take one with me anywhere I thought I might need grizzly protection.
 

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I just got a Ruger .41 and have shot it before when my friend was alive. It kicks more then a .44 so get that out of your head. Now I need to make a mold for it. The .41 is lighter then my .44 frame with the aluminum grip frame It is a good caliber but will never be as good as the .44. I am in a strange position with guns now. I bought all from a friend that died. I have my old SRH I sold him, 2 1911's Dan Wesson and Colt series 80. The Ruger .41, a Colt .380 pocket pistol, a Browning .380, An old Mark I Ruger. An AMT Automag in 9mm Winchester magnum, and a percussion pistol plus many long guns and shotguns. I am flush with so much I need to sell the long guns. One is an HK 93 that I will keep. Some are not worth anything but I have a Rem 700 in .270 that is pristine with a huge Tasco scope. I have sold a 10-22 and a Marlin .22 I have an old side lock Belgian double with some pitting to an 1100 Rem and even an Excell 16 ga made for Monkey wards long ago. A traditions .50 inline in perfect shape. My safe is full and the wall is lined with guns.
 

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Good Mornng Back Mamba,

I bought a 4" 586 in the early '80's. It was an on-duty gun. I'm also a big game hunter who has hunted in deep Rocky Mountain wildernesses in which griz dominated. So I got to thinking, which is an activity for which I have a short rap sheet, that 5 .41 Mag rounds in an "L" Frame would make an excellent wilderness handgun. So I wrote to S&W (Smith-Corona typewriter) asking it to consider a 5-shot L-Frame .41 Rem Mag. I must've raised ire of really important operatives of S&W because it never acknowledged my entreaty.

Then I got to thinkin' some more, which added another entry to my thought rap sheet, which is still on the short side. Would 6 180 grain .357 Mag rounds be a better way to go than 5 .41 Rem Mag rounds? I do not know the answer. What I do know is big cartridges produce big recoil, which is opposite of advantageous were a mean critter to take to a notion of including me on its dining menu.

Here's my conclusion, which might be worth slightly more that my losing NFL playoff predictions: the .357 Mag revolver is the most powerful revolver that most hand gunners can tame. What I mean is a dude who's proficient with a 4" .357 Mag handgun can fire 6 accurate, magnum rounds. I've fired an S&W .41 Mag revolver. I ain't recoil averse. Recoil forced the gun's muzzle off target, which is a very bad thing if a target were a mean critter intending mean critter things.

The most powerful revolver I can rapidly fire w/o muzzle leaving silhouette is the .357 Mag. Hence, the rhetorical question: would 6 rapidly fired and reasonably accurate 180 grain .357 Mag rounds be better that 6 .41 Rem Mag rounds if we were to consider recoil taking muzzle of the latter off target causing loss of sight picture thus forcing its user into the tactical disadvantage of reacquiring sight picture?

I'm good with 6 180 grain .357 Mag rounds. But were I to take another stab and wilderness defense, I'd almost assuredly go with a 1911-A1 chambered for the 10MM. According to EMP 3's handgun carrying opinion, which ain't yet been acclaimed ;-) the 1911-A1 has exceeded ease of carry excellence, is lightning fast to battery, is infinitely faster to reload than a revolver, and, of critical importance, one can keep a 1911-A1's muzzle pointed at a threat and his eyes on a threat while reloading it. Muzzle and eyes on target are life saving tactical advantages.

I'll leave you with another rhetorical question: why ain't a likeness of John Browning holding a 1911 on Mt Rushmore???
Don't believe reloading is a consideration, especially dealing with a grizz. If you have emptied the 1911 and the grizz is still coming....you gotta real problem....
 

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Don't believe reloading is a consideration, especially dealing with a grizz. If you have emptied the 1911 and the grizz is still coming....you gotta real problem....
Quite so, if in grizz country I would have my BFR in .475. The .44 would be good and the .41 at the low end. Heavy cast to remove the tail on exit. My friend is strange, always has a .380 on and if I go over, he locks the door. I am 1/2 mile away and shoot a lot so nobody comes around so I can actually go away and leave my house open. Where I live you hear shooting all around. Even from town. It is a good thing and I love it. Darn we even shot the .50 BMG on my range.

Even though I have no loaded guns in my house I feel safe. No need to carry anywhere for miles but Martinsburg has crime. Not so bad I have no fear there. We can carry both open and concealed without a permit but I see no use for it. Now bear country needs a big gun, rifle is best or shotgun but fishing needs a big handgun. Hunting and a rifle leaning against a tree, out of reach while you gut a moose needs a big handgun too. Pepper spray adds seasoning since you will stink after a bear gets you.
 

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Henry offers a steel lever action in 41 magnum and ammo choices continue to grow.

I would say the 41mag is the gun people choose when you actually know things about guns and cartridges.
And there isn't a whole bunch of us out here who know what the 41 Magnum is and what it can do...

I've owned , cast bullets and reloaded for the 41 magnum since 1969 , a S&W model 58.
Saving my money now for a Henry . Marlin made a few lever actions in 41 magnum but they don't show up often and when they do they aren't affordable .
Put me down as a member of the 41 Magnum Fan Club .
Gary
 

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I can say for a fact that I have shot .357's with more recoil then a .44. Not a push but a hard slap. The BH in .41 does kick faster then a SBH. It is gun weight.
 
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