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I have been thinking about wanting one of those Rugers, and am still almost on the fence about it.
I have a nice pre-War Winchester 375 H&H but think that when the time comes for my two boys to divvy up my guns, there will need to be another big'un that can help to even things out.
I love the idea that the Ruger can match or better the H&H. Only hesitation is whether the Ruger 375 will stand the test of time and still be a production cartridge in 10, or 20, or 30 years.

I have not been seeing any negative reports on the Ruger 375s, so am thinking their may not be any bad news stories.

Anyone else out there curious about them and interested in seeing more discussion on them?
 

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I have been thinking about wanting one of those Rugers, and am still almost on the fence about it.
I have a nice pre-War Winchester 375 H&H but think that when the time comes for my two boys to divvy up my guns, there will need to be another big'un that can help to even things out.
I love the idea that the Ruger can match or better the H&H. Only hesitation is whether the Ruger 375 will stand the test of time and still be a production cartridge in 10, or 20, or 30 years.

I have not been seeing any negative reports on the Ruger 375s, so am thinking their may not be any bad news stories.

Anyone else out there curious about them and interested in seeing more discussion on them?
T, If you really want to "even things out" buy a Ruger in 416!

Suspect that would make "evening things out" more lively, too!
 

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As good as the .375 Ruger is we must first understand the why of it. In that discussion you can add the other Ruger specific cartridges and the Hornady cartridges too. They were all made to #1: Make money for the companys in question and #2: to fill a niche that wasn't really neccessary. Winchester did it with the WSM and WSSM series of cartridges. Remington did it with their RUM and the Super Short series of Magnums. The gun writers get something new to write about and the shooters get to play with a new toy. Hey, it's called Free Enterprise. Nothing wrong with that, nothing at all. And the new cartridges are probably as good as everyone says. Nothing wrong with that either.

But the .375 H&H has stood the test of time for a whole lot of years. Ammo can be found all around the world, wherever big game, and dangerous game is hunted. It is respected and revered.

Ruger is onto something with their short barreled rifles and the cartridges to burn completely in those short barrels. It's an idea whose time has come. But until the reloading companies release their special mix powder to the industry ... and to handloaders ... they have to be reloaded with the conventional powders that don't produce the velocity of those cartridges.

The .375 H&H wasn't broke, why try and fix it. If it were me, I'd find out which son wants which piece first. Perhaps you have another rifle that is special to you that one of the boys wants. Ask 'em, and good luck.

By the way, all of this is my own personal feelings on the subject. The .270 Winchester wasn't broke either. As good as that .270 WSM is, it still fills a mighty small niche.
 

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I lost interest when Ruger/Hornady decided to use a different case for their RCM cartridges. THe 375 Ruger case seemed like a winner to neck down to 358, 338 , etc. Instead they went w/ a smaller case.

All in the interest of niche marketing, I'm sure, but they lost me since I was wishing for a 358 Ruger. I could still do a wildcat, when there's time.
 

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After reading an article on the development of the .375 Ruger, it seems to make a lot more sense than some of the other new rounds on the market. Basically it gives .375 H&H performance, with actually a slight increase in capacity, that will fit standard length actions. Apparently the .375 H&H generally requires a longer "magnum length" action = more expensive guns.

You probably don't read a lot about it because I suspect not that many people shoot .375's (in comparison to smaller caliber/lower powered rounds), and fewer still the newer round. It does sound like it would make a superb "do anything" hunting round, from deer up to bear.
 

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I am also interested in this one. I already shoot a .375 H&H and a .416 Rigby, and was intrigued by the new Ruger. I have been dragging my feet a little, waiting to see what fate the market forces decide. The proving grounds for any new .375 cartridge seem to be Alaska and Africa. I have more friends in Alaska than in Africa, and I am hoping to get a little feedback. I believe that the Hawkeye, in stainless with the Hogue stock, could be a great Alaskan rifle.

The H&H is a long, tapered case, with very little shoulder. It was born in the cordite era, and some early propellants were very temperature sensitive, resulting in high pressures at high ambient temperatures. It was built for reliability, both in feeding and extraction. Reliability is important, when you're nowhere near the top of the food chain. SAAMI pressure is 53,000 CUP.

Both the Ruger and the H&H have the same case head diameter, but the Ruger has a nearly straight walled case, sharper shoulder, and no belt. This allows for a slightly greater case capacity in a shorter cartridge. It operates at a SAAMI pressure of 63,000 CUP. Straight walls, sharp shoulder, higher pressures, hmmm... But with newer propellants, it may work just fine. I do like the shorter action. Cycle time is also a factor in DG hunting. Time will tell if it has the same degree of reliability, even under adverse conditions.

I'll be watching and waiting to see how it does in the field. I'm not one to jump into the latest cartridge just because the gunwriters tell me how great it is. The .375 H&H is the patriarch of the middle-bores, but if the Ruger proves itself worthy, I will certainly find a spot in the gun safe for one.

Regards,
Schuter
 

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You guys that keep waiting to see are the ones killing the cartridge... get one and enjoy it, if it dies out, you'll have a collectible and rare Ruger, if its more successful than the 375 RUM (and it is by a wide margin) then you won't regret it anyway.

I'm waiting on a No. 1 in .416 Ruger.
 

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I don't expect these so called "New Age" cartridges like the "WSSM", "WSM" or whatever they are called, to survive very long. For one thing they don't reallly improve on the time proven cartridges like the .270, .375, etc. Also they cost more than the older cartridges. Why fix anything if the old isn't broke??
 

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I don't expect these so called "New Age" cartridges like the "WSSM", "WSM" or whatever they are called, to survive very long. For one thing they don't reallly improve on the time proven cartridges like the .270, .375, etc. Also they cost more than the older cartridges. Why fix anything if the old isn't broke??
Exactly! Good luck trying to mass-market a caliber niche that is already filled with excellent performers. If anything, I am more interested in older cartridges that have lost their popularity because they are not "super magnum blasters" (i.e., 257 Roberts, 7x57, 6.5x55 Swede, etc.).
Dan
 

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+1^^

Besides, how many of us have elephants or bigfoot roaming our hunting areas? Ruger would be better off putting their time into cartridges and guns the average guy can afford to buy and use instead of living in the past.
 

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+1^^

Besides, how many of us have elephants or bigfoot roaming our hunting areas? Ruger would be better off putting their time into cartridges and guns the average guy can afford to buy and use instead of living in the past.


Alaska doesn't have Elephants or Bigfoot either, yet the big bores are very popular there
 

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Alaska doesn't have Elephants or Bigfoot either, yet the big bores are very popular there
I've yet to see anything in Alaska that can't be killed with a 35 Whelen or 45-70. And they don't require special brass or expensive guns.
 

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The sad truth is that the gun and ammo companies need to survive by selling products in a static market. In our urbanized, plasticized and electronicized society, the number of shooters and hunters is remaining steady at best, not increasing. In fact, I think it is declining and in danger of disappearing, for all practical purposes, in 2 or 3 generations.

Demographically, most shooters and hunters are older, and already own guns for various purposes, and the firearms industry can survive only by selling more guns to a market that is saturated, so to speak. So they must come up with "new" and "improved" guns and ammunition that seems to do something better than what the public already has sitting in the safe or gun rack.

Realistically speaking, if a hunter bought or inherited a bolt action .30/06 at the beginning of his career, he could use it exclusively for life and never be seriously handicapped for hunting in North America. Since quality firearms last virtually forever, one .30/06 rifle could be used over the years by several generations of hunters with no need for them to buy another gun.

And the gun companies would go out of business.

So we get the WSM, WSSM, RUM, SAUM, RCM, Hornady, Marlin, Lazzeroni, Beefaroni etc. lines of cartridges that all do the same thing our older cartridges do once the bullet leaves the muzzle, but seem to do it a little more stylishly and with more sex appeal.

Almost ALL of these cartridges are going to be discontinued sooner or later and it will be difficult to buy ammo or brass for them. A trip to my local Gander Mountain shows several brand new rifles in calibers like .25 WSSM that cannot be sold and for which ammo cannot easily be found. A buddy of mine won one of them in a raffle last year and I am sure it was donated by the store as a tax deduction because they knew it would never sell.

Personally I am glad that the gun and ammo companies seem to have found a way to stay in business, but I won't be much help to them because I am happy with my modest collection of old standards...and I can find ammo for them without the need for Google.com.
 

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+1^^

Besides, how many of us have elephants or bigfoot roaming our hunting areas? Ruger would be better off putting their time into cartridges and guns the average guy can afford to buy and use instead of living in the past.
I think that was sort of the idea behind this cartridge - a .375 H&H equivalent that "regular" hunters, outfitters, and guides could afford. The shorter length of the cartridge and the head design mean it can be chambered in a standard Ruger 77 or similar. The longer .375 H&H has to be chambered in something like the Ruger Magnum. The price difference is significant.

As for usefulness, the .375 H&H was described by Jack O'Conner as being perhaps the best all around cartridge made. Powerful enough for pretty much anything that roams the planet, but flat shooting enough to be used on plains game. Depending on bullet choice, it could be used on anything from antelope and sheep up. Not everyone needs or wants a cartridge like this (my guess is it would be tough on the shoulder if used for popping prairie dogs for a day :) ), but obviously there are enough that do for Ruger to enter the market.

Some of the new cartridges seem a bit silly, some are excellent. I think this is a new cartridge with genuine merit. Not because it improves on the performance of a time-honored cartridge, but because it makes that performance accessible to far more hunters.
 

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You guys that keep waiting to see are the ones killing the cartridge... get one and enjoy it, if it dies out, you'll have a collectible and rare Ruger, if its more successful than the 375 RUM (and it is by a wide margin) then you won't regret it anyway.

I'm waiting on a No. 1 in .416 Ruger.
...and save your brass
 

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Some of the new cartridges seem a bit silly, some are excellent. I think this is a new cartridge with genuine merit. Not because it improves on the performance of a time-honored cartridge, but because it makes that performance accessible to far more hunters.
History is full of "excellent" products that failed in the marketplace.
Dan
 

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If an individual would like to buy one, I would say go for it. Ruger's are very nice rifles, the integral scope mount is brilliant.

Just need to stockpile a good supply of brass, 375 caliber bullets will always be around. :cool:
 

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Rugers are great and it is "a super cartridge", or so I have been told. Shot both a .375 H&H and a .375 Ruger in the same day and could not really tell a difference in recoil, they are both big guns! It seems to be enough gun, for sure! I would consider getting one. If I was to get a .375! Seems to be cutting edge like the .204 ruger?
 

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You guys that keep waiting to see are the ones killing the cartridge... get one and enjoy it, if it dies out, you'll have a collectible and rare Ruger, if its more successful than the 375 RUM (and it is by a wide margin) then you won't regret it anyway.

I'm waiting on a No. 1 in .416 Ruger.
Matt is onto something here. If you buy one T you'll help keep it alive. Craig Boddington admits he has no need for short mags but he loves the Ruger375 and probably will have a 416. It's only money! Buy it , shoot it then give us reports so Ruger can sell more.:D
 
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