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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi my friends,

I have been a day late for about a month and a half each time I find a decent used rifle. I am a lefty who is looking for a used bolt in 30.06 but do not want to pay some of the prices I have found. Recently I had work done at Gander Mountain on a Berreta shotgun-I wanted another bead on the rib and the guy screwed up. He taped in the wrong place and they tried to pass it by me but I noticed the different color on the vent then saw the filled in hole. The gun was new in November and cost over $900. I was mad as ****. They took off $50 on the bill but that's still bs. The guy at the counter asked how to make it up to me and I said - you can start by finding me a good rifle at cost. It turns out they had two recent trade-ins, but they had yet to be checked by the gunsmith. One was a Rem 7400 .06 that looked all right for a 25yr old gun. Then the guy pulled out a win 100 .308 that looked clean, the price was under $400 and I asked why. It should be about $650 if it's really good. I just wondered guys-I remember they had a recall on that model, what was that for-and what about the gun in general. I always thought that model was a classic. It's not the bolt I have been looking so long for, but maybe it will work for me. What should I look for-they have a no return policy. I'm already mad as **** for them ruining the vent and then trying to get away with it. Thanks guys,
Sincerely,
Michael Sicowitz
 

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Piney Woods Moderator
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Sorry for your bad experience at Gander Mtn. Sounds like the shop manager needs adjusting. I owned a Win 100 in 308 a number of years back. I had the extractor replaced three times before I replaced the rifle. I too remember a recall but I have slept since then. Good luck in finding you a good used rifle.
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Check out the first sticky above on this forum.
 

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That sure stinks about the poor gunsmithing! I have a couple model 100s, one a regular rifle in .308 and the other a Carbine version in .308. Personally, I like the model 100 a bit more than the Rems, but not as much as the fine BAR. The recall is a recurring burr to owners of model 100s as there's no way of telling if a rifle has been "fixed" short of calling Winchester. I'd say have them do the $50 fix of installing a new firing pin (if not already done) and take a chance on that good looking rifle. I enjoy the heck out of mine, especially the carbine.
 

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A friend of mine in Maine had a Winchester Model 100 he loved. He could put five shots into a pie plate all day long with that rifle and he didn't care one whit about the accuracy. On the plus side, it never ever malfunctioned.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi all,
I really want that .308 to be the one. It sounds like they are really good or really bad. If the thing cycles a few times without jamming or going off twice-that would be nice. If I get it I will have to make sure it has been fixed. I am still not sure just what the recall was for. Of course a burst instead of a shot is one possibility. It will see limited action anyway. I figure ten rounds at the range and two or three hunting. A couple boxes could last three years. I have seen the .308 in action. In the old days one of the guys had a Savage 99(I think) and we all depended on that guy to fill our tags if we were having trouble. He was magic with that gun. I admit more than one of my deer came home with his hole. I can tell I want it. The cheaper bolt 30.06 are poor quality. I tried the Rem with the plastic stock and the bolt made a loud sqeak. I could order a new Tikka for $650 but after a good scope and gunsmith fees that's like $900 or more. That's too rich for me at the moment.
MS
 

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Mike,

I hunted for 10 years with a gentleman by the name of Stremikis, just north of Neillsville. He carried a Winchester Model 100 in .308 Winchester and used it to harvest many of those big Wisconsin bucks. It wouldn't shoot less than 2" at 100 yards...and he couldn't have cared less, because he rarely shot half that distance.

With all that being said, I know it wouldn't be the gun for me. I'd hold out for a good used bolt-action in 30-'06, as that is the caliber you had in mind. Now, if you do most of your hunting from the ground by sneaking through the brush, a short-action .308 might be a better option, but if you're hunting from a stand I'd hold out for the bolt-action you set out to find.
 

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Well, Mike, it sounds like you know what you want. More important than what may be a better buy or a better choice, is that you should have the rifle that makes you happy. All you have to do now is buy it, tend to the recall issue, and then address any feeding issues that may arise. It doesn't sound like you're paying to much for it going in and couldn't recover your money if you don't want to keep it.

That Model 100 a post '64 I'm guessing?
 

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Hold out for a bolt, or get a Win Model 88 if you want a reliable rifle with the same barrel as the 100. The 100's are too fussy, in my opinion.
 

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Mike,

I hunted for 10 years with a gentleman by the name of Stremikis, just north of Neillsville. He carried a Winchester Model 100 in .308 Winchester and used it to harvest many of those big Wisconsin bucks. It wouldn't shoot less than 2" at 100 yards...and he couldn't have cared less, because he rarely shot half that distance.

With all that being said, I know it wouldn't be the gun for me. I'd hold out for a good used bolt-action in 30-'06, as that is the caliber you had in mind. Now, if you do most of your hunting from the ground by sneaking through the brush, a short-action .308 might be a better option, but if you're hunting from a stand I'd hold out for the bolt-action you set out to find.
I'm just curious as to whether you may have ever handled a model 100 (or model 88) before. I own both, plus a bunch of bolt rifles, but the model 100 is a very fine handling gun, along with the equally fine model 88, which is all but a twin (ala 7600 & 7400). The handling of any rifle (I've owned a bunch) is what makes it a keeper in my house.

I have read where you are a one shot kind of fella, don't even bolt in another round after shooting at a deer as a matter of course. I guess I'm not such a great hunter, as I always have another round in the chamber, whether it be a bolt, lever, or even a single shot (which I hunt with often) immediately after firing the first. Of course, I normally hunt where trees, branches, and thick cover abound; feeling something just might have gone remiss with my first shot. The concept of hunting with a semi-auto works the same way with me, as when I hunt with a single shot. I'd suspect many other hunters feel the same. But, I could be very mistaken!:eek:
 

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I've had the Remington, a 740, and a Win 100 Carbine. That little M100 was a .308 and it accounted for a lot of moose and deer. I NEVER had any problem with it and it would shoot 1" groups on a boring basis. Did it ALL the time. Just for grins I fired 20 rounds and you could cover the entire group with a fifty cent piece. Also have owned the B.A.R, that one in a .300 Win Mag. Too heavy to carry thru the brush though. But sitting on the bank of a lake or river I could shoot across to the opposite shore. Took a bull one time, up on the Albany River. I was sitting in front of camp on the river and shot a bull on the opposite shore. 300 yards. Fine shooting rifle.
 

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I'm just curious as to whether you may have ever handled a model 100 (or model 88) before. I own both, plus a bunch of bolt rifles, but the model 100 is a very fine handling gun, along with the equally fine model 88, which is all but a twin (ala 7600 & 7400). The handling of any rifle (I've owned a bunch) is what makes it a keeper in my house.

I have read where you are a one shot kind of fella, don't even bolt in another round after shooting at a deer as a matter of course. I guess I'm not such a great hunter, as I always have another round in the chamber, whether it be a bolt, lever, or even a single shot (which I hunt with often) immediately after firing the first. Of course, I normally hunt where trees, branches, and thick cover abound; feeling something just might have gone remiss with my first shot. The concept of hunting with a semi-auto works the same way with me, as when I hunt with a single shot. I'd suspect many other hunters feel the same. But, I could be very mistaken!:eek:
Volunteer Hunter,

I shot my friend's model 100 several times and found it, well...clunky. I think it's all a matter of where you grew up and what was put in your hands, when you were young. For the first 20-some years I hunted, it was with a bolt-action rifle and a barrel at least 22" long, or longer. What you call "good handling" guns were never part of the equation. To me, nothing else feels as right as a scoped, bolt-action rifle with a solid, one-piece stock. I never shot a lever-action or semi-auto rifle, except out of curiosity, until just a few years ago. A standard 30/30 lever gun with open sights would have been a serious liability for 90% of the hunting I did, growing up.

Out West, you're more likely to see a deer at over 200 yards, than less than 100, so a gun that gave "paper-plate" accuracy just didn't cut it, in my dad's book. All of our deer guns were measured by whether or not they shot 1" groups at 100 yards...those that didn't were rarely taken afield.

I do not claim to be a superb shot and you can read my footnote to see how I feel about shot distances. However, I have learned, through encouragement, example AND experience, that if you don't do everything in your power to make the first shot count, the speed with which you take a second shot is almost always purely academic.

Nowadays, I hunt in Indiana and I shoot a Contender 44Mag carbine, 44/40 lever-action, 50 cal ML, none of which are good for more than maybe 150 yards. Only the Model '92 offers a quick follow-up shot but the way I hunt with it, that doesn't do me any good because I never think to cycle the action. Again, I don't say this to sound holier-than-thou, or anything, but I'm too busy watching where the deer I just shot is going to die, right there, or after it runs a bit. I don't guess I ought to ever go hunting grizzly bears, huh? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hi guys,
Once again I learned a bunch by asking the right question. And you all had important insight from your lifetime of hunting and owning classic firearms. Thanks to everyone for making it easier for me to figure this mess out. Now that money is tight I need all the help I can get and our members are about the best anyone could ever hope for. The different perspectives reflect all of our different backgrounds from our first shot to the present. This collective wisdom is a joy to be a very small part of. Thanks again to the great responce to my question and I will weigh the arguments carefully before being so impulsive. I must have ten guns or more that just collect dust. I very much agree that the bottom line is that I should be happy with the choice. Perhaps saving a bit more money could make that happen. On the other hand summer is coming and I blow all my money on fishing trips. I will have to act fairly soon and use Gander Mountain's mistake as an ace up my sleeve. You all really helped.
Sincerely,
Michael Sicowitz
 

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had overall good experience with a .308 model 100

My first deer rifle was a model 100 .308 about 25 yr ago. It was reliable and exceptionally accurate for a semi. The firing pin did break on me and a local gunsmith made a replacement for me (that was just prior to the recall, I believe). I never had any problem with jamming or firing double. The rifle was a good one. But after several years and many deer, I realized that I had never fired the thing more than once at the same deer. I decided to trade it for a more accurate and much lighter bolt gun and I'm glad I did. I now have 4 bolt rifles in .308--it is my favorite caliber for shooting paper and for deer hunting. My latest rifle is the Tikka T3 hunter. It is as light as a feather and shoots absolute lights out at all ranges. I can recommend it for sure. But if you decide to go with the model 100, that will probably serve you well, too. Best wishes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hi YOKE,
You may have figured this deal out for me. The Tikka was something I had in mind but being a lefty they only have rightys at the store. I even asked if they would get one but put it on hold after they messed up the gunsmithing. I wonder why you like the .308 rather than a 30.06. Is it just because you are so sure of yourself from success in the past-or would the 06 possibly be a better choice for me. I admit they sure are close-maybe a bit more choice in ammo with the 06, but for sure both are deadly on whitetails and I thank you for your advice.
Sincerely,
Michael Sicowitz
 

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i tell ya mike for deer the difference between the 308 and the '06 is meaningless. i don't have a 308 but i have a remington 700 classic in 300 savage that for all intent and purpose is a 308 since it is in a bolt gun and i love it, i also have a 30/06 in a remington 700 and like it a lot too but if i said that it was better on deer i'd just be showing you how ignorant i am. the 308 is a dandy and with the right bullets it'll take a lot bigger game than deer!!
 
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