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Saw some of the new Winchester 1885 low and high wall single shots at Cabelas this week. One in 45-70 as well as 22-250 and 243. They are beautiful.
Seems to me that there is too much information out there on how to make your Ruger #1 more accurate, so there must be something to it. Does anyone shoot the 1885 and are they accurate? Wouldn't want to get one then spend big bucks on bringing it "up to standards"
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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You'll get your money back on ammo savings - just line up 3 or 4 pigs with each shot and only use one bullet with the .45-70 at a time!!! :D
 

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A friend has a low wall and it is accurate but had a difficult trigger. He used Dale MaGee’s trigger fix. It is a nice rifle and the weight forward (octagon barrel) lets it handle a little better than my TC carbine off hand.
 

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My Winchester 1885 Hunter in .270 WSM is the most accurate rifle I own (or have shot). I don't think you'll be disappointed. I've found the triggers on my 1885's to be pretty decent (I adjust them all to the minimum setting - around 3 lbs).
 

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I am biased, these are the most beautiful rifles ever made. I personally have not had one that I could not get to shoot below moa. If you think the 1885's are gorgeous check out the Browning B-78's. Basically same rifle just different wood, and a worse trigger. All of the ones I have worked with were out of the box, stock.

When I say get to shoot below moa, I mean by strictly handloading ammo. No mechanical work was done to any of them they are truely out of the box.
 

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low wall in .223

Here is a picture of my Browning 1885 in .223 and nothing has been done to it.

All three shots touching. This may not be representative of all 1885s but it got me hooked
 

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I really enjoy my 1885s and B-78, (.22lr, .30-30, .38-55, and two .45-70s).

I also love my Ruger #1s, (.357mag, .220 Swift, .25-06, .375H&H, .416 Rigby, .45-70). Don't be afraid of the #1s. The issue with the forend hanger is easily fixed, if it turns out to be a problem at all. I tinkered with the Swift and the .25-06, installing the forend hanger set-screw, and they benefited a little. They all shoot sub-MOA, with well-tuned, meticulous handloads.

Single-shots are quite addictive. Choose your caliber, and handle a few, and see what fits you best.

Regards,
Schuter
 

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I also have a Winchester 1885 Low Wall in .223. I agonized between it and a Ruger No.1. So far I haven't been dissapointed with it. Even though it's only about 6 and 1/4 pounds, its a very accurate rifle and makes a great carry rifle for hunting coyotes and prairie dogs. The only thing I don't like about it is the availablily of scope bases for it. Can only find the Leupolds and I don't like them. Do wish I had good enough eyes to shoot a hunter model with tang sights. That would be awesome.:)
 

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I hate the leupold rear base, it hangs to the rear. A Burris High Wall will work for the rear mount and the Leupold low Wall works for the front. Bad part is you have to buy two sets to get what you need.
 

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I have always been interested in these, and will probably make a 45-70 single shot Winchester my next purchase.
Can anyone explain too me in layman's terms what the difference is between low wall and high wall?
Beautiful guns by the way!
Thanks
 

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I have always been interested in these, and will probably make a 45-70 single shot Winchester my next purchase.
Can anyone explain too me in layman's terms what the difference is between low wall and high wall?
Beautiful guns by the way!
Thanks
Look at the picture of Doctom54's low wall, and note the receiver. Now look at the receiver on my high wall in my avatar. The low wall receiver sides are cut lower and expose most of the hammer and the falling block. The high wall receiver sides leave only the hammer spur exposed (when viewed from the side).
 

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Look at the picture of Doctom54's low wall, and note the receiver. Now look at the receiver on my high wall in my avatar. The low wall receiver sides are cut lower and expose most of the hammer and the falling block. The high wall receiver sides leave only the hammer spur exposed (when viewed from the side).
Thank you for the explanation!
 

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The nice thing about single shots in magnum calibers is that you can get a long barrel to burn all that powder in a fairly reasonable size / length package.

Gander Mountain had some great sales on 1885's last year. They were staying on the shelves forever so they decided to put them on clearance. I saw three of these rifles in varying calibers going for $750 red tag. If I would have had the money at the time, I would have bought one but all my funds were going towards a custom rifle build. I finally quit going into the store because the temptation was getting too much. :eek:
 

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The 1885 hammer can be lightened a bit, the trigger tuned up a little, and they will shoot with anything else out there. I've had a few #1's, still do. When it comes to cleaning and having to disassemble it--the 1885 wins hands down. Ruger #1 requires a few tricks and a special tool. The 1885 needs a hammer, a punch and a flat blade screwdriver, and does not need to be anchored in a vice, you can do it all in your lap.
They really are a sleeper in the gun world. Once people acquire one though, they stick with it.
 

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I hate the leupold rear base, it hangs to the rear. A Burris High Wall will work for the rear mount and the Leupold low Wall works for the front. Bad part is you have to buy two sets to get what you need.
Every time I see a 1885 with scope, it looks like it's mounted really high. Is this the only way to mount them? I like my scopes down low so my cheek is firm on the butt stock.
 

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I used weaver bases numbers 11 and 29 on my 1885 (223). They are still available from weaver.I bought the 223 and liked it so much I ended up with that and a 32/40 traditional hunter.Both guns can shooter better than I can.
 

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I used weaver bases numbers 11 and 29 on my 1885 (223). They are still available from weaver.I bought the 223 and liked it so much I ended up with that and a 32/40 traditional hunter.Both guns can shooter better than I can.
Can you post a pix with those rings and scope?

Did Winchester make 28" barrels too? Web says 24" but I've seen some described with 28".

Is there any advantage to high wall vs low wall in this caliber?
 

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Most of the newer Winchester High-Walls have 28" barrels. There are a few with 30" and 34" barrels, plus some shorter-barreled specials. I believe all the low-walls have 24" barrels.

I don't think the high or low wall action has any real advantage at this point in time, other than what you like in terms of appearance, weight, and barrel length in the factory packages.
 

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Every time I see a 1885 with scope, it looks like it's mounted really high. Is this the only way to mount them? I like my scopes down low so my cheek is firm on the butt stock.
I believe I used medium height rings on my .270 WSM 1885. My face is down on the stock. You will have to have some height to your scope to allow access to the hammer.
 

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