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What would one cost of recient manufacture with no collection value in good shape? Would love to have one. Winchester must of made millions of em. I want one, don't know why I just have to have one. They do not have much put down power, and will hardly shoot farther than 100 yards to kill game realiably. Now having said that there ante no flies on the thurty thruty. That rifle has put more meat on more tables than any other caliber period. It settled the west, is a part of United States history, I need one desperately.
Only problem is I am a ex-pat US citizen living in Canada and can not get one in the U.S. and the market up here is too small to find the one I want.

Cheers & Tighter Groups: Eaglesnester
 

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I recently sold a 1968 Model 94 in "good", but not "excellent", condition for $300, shipped.

There's generally a few, F/S, in the classifieds section of various gun websites like this one, for $400 or less.

I would think them more expensive in Canada - but I've seen a few sellers from there, so you "might" get lucky.

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94 Ae

I have supply of the Win 30-30 a plenty....some NIB.
If you know of a dealer in US with export license let me know and we can talk....
SOSARMS
 

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"They do not have much put down power, and will hardly shoot farther than 100 yards to kill game realiably."

That's right, shots at anything over 100 yards the bullet will just bounce off. Canada must have some mighty tough critters. Or you have been reading too many "gun" magazines. :D:D

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You must be quite a ways from anything approaching civilization to not be able to locate a Model '94 in 30/30. It's undoubtedly the most common chambering, for the most common civilian rifle ever produced. It's like finding a piece of straw in a hay-stack, around here.

Contact the closest gun dealer you can get to and tell him you'd like an "average" 94 in 30/30. He'll be able to find you one, no problem, if he doesn't have one in-stock. Also, you are definitely selling the 30/30 short, in terms of power and range. Read up a little and you'll find it's deer-capable for around twice as far as you suggest.
 

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The old 30/30 isn't much good over about 225 yards. I think if you
sight it in correctly it's about 6 inches low at that range. I believe it's
about 14 inches at 300 yds. My numbers might not be right on but
don't sell the 30/30 short it's a good cartridge.

Zeke
 

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I bought two at a local pawn shop here for $400. Neither were beauty queens, one was prety rough lookin. Took em home, took em both apart, cleaned em up with SOS pads to remove the surface rust. Sprayed both while warmed up in the oven with Graphite bullet mold spray (keeps em from rusting, looks similar to dark grey parkerizing when fininshed) replaced the stocks with Ramline black plastic. Both came out lookin like "combat" rifles, you'd never guess what they'd looked like when I bought em. The bullet mold spray wears off to some extent, but is easily renewed. Both shoot good as new guns. I spray the inside of the actions too, this stuff is also a good dry lubricant.
 

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I know the times I was out in the bush in the north country, the 94 Winchester 30-30 was still quite popular. Not because of its kiling power but because it was light and handy and easy to carry. You must remember that these people hunted for food and didnt care if it was a bull, cow or calf. And they hunted everyday so had the option to wait for a good close shot. If you can tell by my name I am a fan of the 30-30. That being said I am the first to admit it is no powerhouse. I am wondering how many here have actually shot anything bigger than a 300 pound animal. I shot one elk at 200 yards with a 30-30. Afterthought I realised it was way to far for such a round. I would limit my shots in the future on elk to 150 yards and then only if it was broadside.
 

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I shot a 400-500 pound feral hog with one in the 70's. He never knew I was there til I pulled the trigger. Range was about 50-60 yards. Factory 170 grain load (never hunted with anything else in the 30-30) Aimed for his front shoulder, he was facing me at a quartering angle. He wheeled and ran when I shot him, never left a blood trail, but my Dad found him dead two weeks later about 500+ yards from where he was shot.
 

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I shot a 400-500 pound feral hog with one in the 70's. He never knew I was there til I pulled the trigger. Range was about 50-60 yards. Factory 170 grain load (never hunted with anything else in the 30-30) Aimed for his front shoulder, he was facing me at a quartering angle. He wheeled and ran when I shot him, never left a blood trail, but my Dad found him dead two weeks later about 500+ yards from where he was shot.
Thank you for sharing this story! It illustrates how many cartridges will kill a big boar hog, but not in a way where they can be recovered in a timely fashion. In your situation, that may not have been your goal, but if you had hoped to make a little bacon off that big critter, a more powerful cartridge, or different shot placement would have been required.

That quartering-to shot, on any animal, is tempting but after losing a decent buck one year (archery) I've made the decision to only take broadside and quartering away shots. The one exception would be if I'm using one of the more powerful rifle cartridges, then I will take a frontal or quartering-to shot, but still not on a big hog.
 

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That's a big pig. Having found other people's bullets in pigs that I've shot, I'd say they are one of the more demanding animals regarding taking a bullet through the shoulder. Excellent test medium, if you find them before the buzzards do ;)

Frankly, in that size range..... let me assure you it was the best outcome possible for him to die somewhere else! That would have been one serious job to cut him up. A two hundred pounder is still a hundred more pounds more than I care to deal with.... done it by myself several times and you think I'd learn.....
 

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I've processed an 80lb wild hog and a 225lb sow and given the option of either, I would definitely choose the smaller job! Not only is it a lot less work, start to finish, what winds up in the freezer is usually a lot more palatable. :)

This kind of ties into another thread we have going because if I were to use a 30/30 for wild hogs, I would try out some of that Buffalo Bore ammo. I'd also be very concerned with shot placement and the size of the porker in question because I have four hungry kids to feed. ;)
 

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That's a big pig. Having found other people's bullets in pigs that I've shot, I'd say they are one of the more demanding animals regarding taking a bullet through the shoulder. Excellent test medium, if you find them before the buzzards do ;)

Frankly, in that size range..... let me assure you it was the best outcome possible for him to die somewhere else! That would have been one serious job to cut him up. A two hundred pounder is still a hundred more pounds more than I care to deal with.... done it by myself several times and you think I'd learn.....
Mike, :eek:! I'm as old as kdub, and I still haven't learned either. :p
 

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Thank you for sharing this story! It illustrates how many cartridges will kill a big boar hog, but not in a way where they can be recovered in a timely fashion. In your situation, that may not have been your goal, but if you had hoped to make a little bacon off that big critter, a more powerful cartridge, or different shot placement would have been required.

That quartering-to shot, on any animal, is tempting but after losing a decent buck one year (archery) I've made the decision to only take broadside and quartering away shots. The one exception would be if I'm using one of the more powerful rifle cartridges, then I will take a frontal or quartering-to shot, but still not on a big hog.
He wasn't big, he was average size for east Texas. :D And I wasn't meat hunting (not him at least) when I decided to let him know I was there. I was hunting in a ground blind with a broken leg. He wasn't the first to invade my space that year. He was only one of seven I took out with that 30-30. He was the only one to get away. We had a huge hog problem where we hunted. We killed em every chance we got. And we didn't put a dent in the population. With that many hogs, the decision to shoot is a matter of self preservation, not whether or not you want meat. We had two situations where the outcome had we not shot would have been life or death for me or my father. You just never knew what one of these hogs would do, it was always best to shoot first, then ask questions. I never felt outgunned against a hog with a 30-30.
 
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