Shooters Forum banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
I inhereted this gun when my father in law passed away. Iv'e seen it in pictures from the late 60s and early 70's so I know it's build date is around 1962 (according to sn). I have looked for years for this stock on the 30 06 and have not seen another one like it on the net. Does anyone know where this came from? What is it? Any history at all would really be helpful. I LOVE this gun, carried it for the last 10 seasons. I is dear to my heart so I don't care about what it's worth cause i'll never trade it just for money.








 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,248 Posts
Its not factory, it looks like a Tigerwood or possibly a Maple. When I replaced the hardwood floors in my house with Brazilian Cherry, some of the pieces looked like this.

Regardless, its gorgeous whatever it is! Thanks for sharing, and welcome to Shooter's Forum!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
604 Posts
It looks like one of the old Fajen style of stock popular in the 70's. Appears to be tigerstriped Maple, or perhaps Fiddleback Maple. Definitely aftermarket. Used to be a technique for creating Tigerstripe on a Maple stock. Pretty much the same with the old flintlocks of years past. They'd wrap the stock in string and set the string on fire and it would work it's way around the stock. Really hard to do right ... this one was done right. Magnificient looking piece. NEVER sell it. It's one of a kind. Congratulations. And Merry Christmas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Wow that is fasinating. The lines are so straight that you can almost imagine wrapping the stock in string. Thank you so much for your insight.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
47 Posts
I have a friend that has a muzzle loader stocked to the muzzle with tiger maple and brass hardware. It's a beautiful rifle. If you were at the bench next to me at the range, it would make me stop what I was doing to admire it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
930 Posts
That's a natural tiger in that wood. The burning string method mentioned above was used, but it doesn't give nearly this good of a result. I've done a fair amount of woodwork, including building a tiger-stripe flintlock, and that kind of striping is natural, but not very common to have that consistant for the full length. Expensive wood.

WHat are the nosecap and pistol grip end cap made of? Looks like bone or ivory.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,589 Posts
It has the yellowish color of ivory. Regardless of what it is, it's nice! And by the bolt, I see that it's a featherweight.

sd, I suggest that you delete the last photo that shows the serial number. Apparently, thieves like to see these and make claims on guns being stolen from them. And if you have no paper trail on the gun, they could be successful.

Edit: sd, I deleted the last photo for you since you weren't on the forum at the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks i did not know that. I an currently attempting to find out the history. luckely i have dated photographs with known people holding this gun from over the years. alot of years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
Stock looks very similar to an old maple Mauser stock I have and am now turning into my new .220 swift. Mine was an aftermarket stock, not sure of the maker, but very likely could have been through the same company as yours. The first two pictures are part way through my restoration, and the last two are what it looked like when I got my hands on it.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
No problem, wish I knew the maker for you. It's going together in the next couple weeks so I'll put a pic up for you when it's all done. By the way your stock is fantastic looking. Hard to find a stock like that now days unless you want to spend lots of $$$$$$$$. I got lucky with finding mine. Those caps look interesting. Are they wood? wood grain in them? Otherwise they look like they very well could be Ivory of some sort. I don't know when They quit allowing the importation of Ivory, but your original build date may be close to that date. Did your father in law ever go to Africa?

Any way you put it, you have a great looking rifle. Looks to be nothing special about the rifle itself other than being a Pre-64 possibly according to your research, which are sought after rifles. The stock alone very well could be worth more than the rifle itself, but together they make a great pair. It might be in your best interest to get an appraisal for Insurance purposes in case of a fire or theft. If it were mine, I would clean and oil it stick it in the safe and shoot it on the range once in a while. I would go out and buy a hunting rifle to use for that purpose. It sounds like it's worth more to you sentimentally than monetary value, so that's why I say that, and you had quite a few hunting seasons with this rifle already. To me it's served a purpose over the past 45+ years any maybe time for retirement. That being said, if you still want to use it by all means go ahead and use it for another 40 years.

I'll take mine out and use it cause I can always refinish it and it doesn't mean much sentimentally to me, otherwise some may say that wood is too fancy to be on a hunting rifle.

Looks like an old Weaver K-4 or K-6 on there too! I have an old K-6 on a .22-250, nice old scopes!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I don't remember my father in law traveling to africa; the bulk of my in laws are from basque spain. So much attention to the stock, i neglected to inspect the scope. You have a good eye. I will take your advice and find a reputable gunsmith in my area, prep it for shooting 1 to 2 times a year, and look for another rfle to hunt with. For me, it's about the hunt out in the woods with my family. That's what is true to my heart, the rifle has been a part of it , but secondary to the experience. I just look at it as a working piece of art, thankful to carry such a unique power tool in my hands. The cap is not wood, must be ivory, or some form of bone, dont know.


 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,248 Posts
There are a few memorable guns in my family like that. All the men in my family have grown up hunting, and if they weren't hunting they were walking Mully's Island driving for others in the stand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
610 Posts
I'm not Ivory expert maybe someone else will chime in. As for the gun sound like a good idea to me, as long as you still shoot it once in a while.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,589 Posts
Good work on that lovely stock, spitfire!

sd, I had an old Weaver V7 refurbished a few years ago that wouldn't adjust, and it now sits on a Mauser 338-06. Those old Weavers are great scopes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
The scope has sighted in pre season every year so I never gave much thought about it. Sign of well made hardware i suppose. thanks again for all that have taken the time for input. VERY interesting for me.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top