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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Read around a bit, and seems like a good community here, so here 'goes with my first post...

Reloading experience so far has been tagging along, so to speak. Got my own setup now, and first off is my 30-30 win for the Model 94. Grabbed some Hornady 150 gr RN, and was planning on starting at 29.7 grains of Hogdon H335 (Hogdon's recommended starting load), but just looked down and noticed the primers I got were Winchester Large Rifle Magnum instead of regular WLR.

I know enough to know I don't know much :) So do I just need to go get new primers, or can I make these work? Just how drastically will it affect the load? From a few other posts, i seem to gather that if I stay toward starting load and work up, I'm probably good, but none of that was specific to 30-30 or H335, so thought I'd ask.

Thanks, all.
 

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Welcome to the shooters forum.

You can use the magnum primers but need to keep in mind pressure can be higher when substituting components other than what's listed in the manuals. A 5% reduction of powder is whats usually recommended.

Is there some reason you don't want to buy standard primers?
 

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Winchester primers used to be marked " for standard or magnum loads".
Anyway, you will be fine to start out at that charge weight.

Cheezywan
 

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If you're just getting started in reloading, stick to the specifics of a load recipe.

Winchester's large PISTOL primers are marked for standard or magnum loads, but they are the only primer type to make that claim. They have different large rifle primers for standard and magnum loads.

While you "could" use the magnum primers, you'd want to be even more cautious about approaching MAX powder charges. You'd really be better off returning those for standard rifle primers, or trading them, if you can.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all the quick answers. No, no reason I can't go get regular primers, but I bought these just long enough ago that the place I bought them from won't take them back. So I'm going to have them kicking around anyway.

Maybe I'll get some regular primers, load a batch mostly with those, and do a few with the Magnum, so I can compare. Just wanted to make sure I wasn't in a danger zone with magnum primers, at the starting load.
 

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They are pretty hot either way (Winchester brand). As an experiment, I once checked some .444 Marlin loads with Winchester large rifle, large rifle magnum, and large pistol. The magnum primers got the lowest velocities, and you couldn't really tell any difference between the large rifle and large pistol. This was lighting off 50 or so grains of Varget with a cast bullet, FYI.

Probably not a good idea in general to use large pistol primers in rifle cases, but the .444 Marlin pressure ceiling isn't substantially different than a .44 mag, so thought I'd give it a try.

Anyway.... if that is what you have and it is not convenient to get more, then you can certainly try. But you might be better off with something milder. The .30-30 isn't using very much powder, in the world of rifle cartridges. Nor do you generally use a very slow powder.

Best of luck.
 

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In all seriousness, If you work up from the start load, you, or anybody else for that matter, would never know you were using magnum primers. It MAY have an adverse effect on velocity and accuracy, but unless you try it, you'll never know.
I often use standard primers in magnum cartridges and vise versa with standard cartridges. It sometimes tightens groups, so can be beneficial.

Cheers.
 

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I have a couple of trays of WLRMag primers. Use them up, just be sure to start at the manual's starting load or slightly lower and work carefully up from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, everyone. I'll do that. I also picked up a brick of regular LR primers, so I'll see if I notice much of a difference shooting, or a difference in the cases after inspecting post-firing.
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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Will the place where you get your primers trade? I know my guy will as he's called me in the past and asked me "Hey do you have any such'n'such primers? I got a guy . . . . "

That's what id' try. That way there is no question as to what you've got . . . . EVER. No wondering in say five years "Now what primers did I use with this"

There's some that say H335 needs a magnum primer to set it off, but I went through probably 40 pounds of the stuff through my .223's (before Benchmark) and never had a regular large rifle primer fail to set it off.

RJ
 
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Since you found some standard primers, put the magnum primers away for now. For a new reloader it's best to stick with the reloading manual's recommendations and after gaining a bit of experience examining the results, you can try the "optional" components. Early in my reloading (pre web), I tried every imaginable combination of components (magnum vs. standard vs. rifle vs. pistol primers), and working carefully, beginning with starting loads, I never had any major problems, mostly just differences in accuracy and at times unburned powder...
 

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Elk Whisperer (Super Moderator)
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WOW!!! I musta been asleep when I posted this morning. It should read SMALL rifle primers :eek: :eek:

RJ
 

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In all seriousness, If you work up from the start load, you, or anybody else for that matter, would never know you were using magnum primers.
I've done that very thing using Red Dot and cheap cast pistol bullets in a .30-30. I had a thousand or so aged Remington 9 1/2 Magnum primers, and the same number of cast bullets, I think 90 or 100gr. They all went bang without a problem, and were pretty accurate at 25yds. About 22LR for noise.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well, it took a little while before I could get out and shoot, but I took two batches of 30-30 with me, loaded exactly the same except for half with the magnum primers, half regular. Again, this was starting load of 29.7 grns of H335 with Hornady 150 grain RN bullets.

Slight, slight difference between the primers. Almost so slight I thought it might have been in my head, but my buddy felt it too without knowing what to expect. The magnum primers produced a tiny bit more straight-back recoil, but no noticeable rise. Didn't have a bench for super accurate grouping, but prone at ~50-70 yards, all shots were grouped together.

In other words, no trouble at all using the magnum primers at starting load, and for just plinking and practicing, I sure didn't notice a difference downrange.

Thanks again, all.
 

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CAP: Something which hasn't been covered is [that] some manuals ( Speer's) for instance recommend magnum primers for [hard-to-ignite] powders...such as Winchesters Ball Powders and Hodgdon's related *Spherical* powders made by the same company which supplies Winchester's Ball Powders....Especially during extremely cold weather shooting. The coating on the powder makes it a little more difficult to ignite during extremely cold weather.
What may be seemingly okay (in warmer weather) with little or no difference in performance between standard and magnum primers, may not be up to par with standard primers in colder weather ....Even in a case as relatively small as the .30-30. In short...If a manual recommends a particular primer-or any item in their loading data--it's best to go with what is in the manual....At least until you have some (enough) experience at the loading bench to know what can be substituted for what.

Just my humble $.02 worth from 40 years at the bench.

Will.
 

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Will-j has it right. CCI actually reformulated their magnum primers in 1989 just to work better with the St. Marks Western Cannon series of powders. Your H335 is one of these, being the canister grade version of WC844. The heavy exterior deterrent coating is the reason these powders start burning slow and have a harder time making their own adequate start pressure for an even burn. What the magnum primer does is make a higher volume of gas, so it raises the start pressure a little to help get it to an adequate threshold, and usually they have metal particles in them now that throw a shower of hot sparks to help ignition of the heavy deterrent concentrations at the surface of a spherical propellant. This doesn't always result in increased pressure or velocity for complicated reasons. However, it can result in more consistent ignition. The easiest way to tell is with a chronograph. If your velocity SD gets smaller with magnum primers, that's a good confirmation that they are helping. If it gets worse, they aren't. In smaller case capacities in particular, they may make things worse, because they make more gas than is actually needed and start to unseat the bullet or add their own variation to the final result.

The other thing is to look at how accurately your loads shoot. I advised one Garand shooter to try magnum primers because his .30-06 load left a lot of empty space in the case for the primer to try to pressurize. He reported his group size dropped by 1/3.

There is a good article on primers here.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
All very good info. Thanks, guys.

Where I'm not planning on shooting a bunch in very cold temps, or competition shooting, I'll not likely do a ton of analytics on this. I only had a box of 100 magnum primers anyway, and after this weekend, have fired 30 or 40 of them. In the meantime, i also got a bunch of standard Rifle primers, and mostly fired those. It was more of a question of "can I?" to use up what I had, as opposed to "should I?" based on any desire for tweaking or perfecting performance.

At least for now, that is. Like I said, this is all great info, and to the point you made, Will-j, about sticking to manuals until I have more experience, I wouldn't be surprised if I revisit this all later as I get a better feel for my loads.
 
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