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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
G'day all,

Well to add insult to injury, on top of a shocking drought this year it also looks like we're going to have a particularly bad year for dingos. (native wild dogs). We don't use 1080 poison on our properties so shooting them is the way to go.
There are so many dead roos and wallabies in the paddock this year from the drought, as well as the carcasses of cattle that we've lost, that you'd think the dingos would leave calves alone. They have food available literally everywhere.
Unfortunately, now we're nearing xmas and the pups are all half grown, there are packs running around everywhere and they're pulling down calves just for sport. We lost 3 in the yards right near the houses, dingos came in in the middle of the night and slaughtered them. Also finding a few dead ones that have been pulled down, and we got a poddy the other day that was bitten on the legs and back.
Since the start of November I've shot 11 dingos with the .204, at ranges from 40 to 240 yards. Yesterday we were out checking dams (we're getting a few weaker cows that keep getting bogged, so have to go and check every afternoon) and as we were coming down into a gully in the ute I looked over and saw a dingo emerging from the bushes at about 60 yards range. I grabbed the .204, and quickly shot him in the shoulder with a 40gn Ballistic tip. As I reloaded two more dingos strode out into the open, and a hasty shot into the shoulder of the second one dropped it into a screaming heap. My two dogs that were in the back jumped out to go for it, and the third dingo actually turned back and went for them. Through the scope he was running flat out in my direction and at about 50 yards I hit the trigger. The beauty of the .204 is there's very little perceived recoil so you can watch the bullet strike. The dog did a complete forward somersault as his legs collapsed then slid along in the dust for a bit. Quite a spectacular shot to watch.
That brought my tally up to 14. Nearing the end of our run and just on dark, we ran into a pack of 5. We were actually stalking in on a mob of pigs we'd seen in the distance and I'd swapped my .204 for my new open sighted Marlin .35 Rem. We had our dogs tied up back at the ute and the dingos could hear them barking and were heading down to investigate. In the semi dark we nearly ran right into them! It didn't work out that I could get a shot at them, but I'll be going back this afternoon so we might see them again then.

I realize shooting from the ute might not fit everyone's definition of hunting so if you find it unsporting or morally wrong, that's fine but please don't lecture me. I've put in many miles on foot hunting various other game out here and dingos as well. But this is a part of my work and that's how it's done out here. The ute makes a stable shooting platform and it's an efficient way of controlling these stock killers. And it's still good fun shooting them, no matter what anyone might say!

Hope you guys found this interesting, a bit of vermin control down under!
 

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Nimrod:

I certainly feel your pain. My family has been into the ranching business for as far back as anbody knows, and unfortunately, the dogs to a number here too. We quite regularly get coyotes actually chewing ears and tails (and occasionally chewing the legs up) off of live calves, without acutally killing them outright. Needless to say, with winter around, a calf weakend by wounds like that very seldom makes it.

What is interesting is the fact that we also had a terrible drought this year.

I suppose it would make sense that a drought would be responsible for more dead deer (or in your case, "roos"), which would mean easier food for the dogs, and therefore a larger population of them. It's curious to me though that the numbers don't increase the year following the drought, but rather during the drought. Maybe "out of towner's" move in to take advantage of the drought?

Finally, when it comes to killing dogs as vermin control, it doesn't matter how it's done...it simply has to be done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not sure either why we have such an influx this year, certainly if I don't stay on top of them there will be a lot to breed next year. I know you were interested in using the .204 as a 'yote rifle for shooting skins, well, 2 of these dogs were virtually unmarked but the third had a massive entrance wound when the bullet hit his shoulder. I have photos but its a bit hard to post them!
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Make sure the pictures are under 100K. That is probably causing the problems with posting. You can use Irfanview to resize, it's a free download.
 

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G'day all,

Well to add insult to injury, on top of a shocking drought this year it also looks like we're going to have a particularly bad year for dingos. (native wild dogs). We don't use 1080 poison on our properties so shooting them is the way to go.
There are so many dead roos and wallabies in the paddock this year from the drought, as well as the carcasses of cattle that we've lost, that you'd think the dingos would leave calves alone. They have food available literally everywhere.
Unfortunately, now we're nearing xmas and the pups are all half grown, there are packs running around everywhere and they're pulling down calves just for sport. We lost 3 in the yards right near the houses, dingos came in in the middle of the night and slaughtered them. Also finding a few dead ones that have been pulled down, and we got a poddy the other day that was bitten on the legs and back.
Since the start of November I've shot 11 dingos with the .204, at ranges from 40 to 240 yards. Yesterday we were out checking dams (we're getting a few weaker cows that keep getting bogged, so have to go and check every afternoon) and as we were coming down into a gully in the ute I looked over and saw a dingo emerging from the bushes at about 60 yards range. I grabbed the .204, and quickly shot him in the shoulder with a 40gn Ballistic tip. As I reloaded two more dingos strode out into the open, and a hasty shot into the shoulder of the second one dropped it into a screaming heap. My two dogs that were in the back jumped out to go for it, and the third dingo actually turned back and went for them. Through the scope he was running flat out in my direction and at about 50 yards I hit the trigger. The beauty of the .204 is there's very little perceived recoil so you can watch the bullet strike. The dog did a complete forward somersault as his legs collapsed then slid along in the dust for a bit. Quite a spectacular shot to watch.
That brought my tally up to 14. Nearing the end of our run and just on dark, we ran into a pack of 5. We were actually stalking in on a mob of pigs we'd seen in the distance and I'd swapped my .204 for my new open sighted Marlin .35 Rem. We had our dogs tied up back at the ute and the dingos could hear them barking and were heading down to investigate. In the semi dark we nearly ran right into them! It didn't work out that I could get a shot at them, but I'll be going back this afternoon so we might see them again then.

I realize shooting from the ute might not fit everyone's definition of hunting so if you find it unsporting or morally wrong, that's fine but please don't lecture me. I've put in many miles on foot hunting various other game out here and dingos as well. But this is a part of my work and that's how it's done out here. The ute makes a stable shooting platform and it's an efficient way of controlling these stock killers. And it's still good fun shooting them, no matter what anyone might say!

Hope you guys found this interesting, a bit of vermin control down under!
Is .204 is enough to kill a wild pig. I wanna to know what its range is? I also looking for gun. But I am confuse which kinda of gun I have to buy. We are farmer and our location is near a forest and there are a lots of pigs there. I wanna to hunt those. Because they always done big damage in our crops. I am looking forward to all gurus very hopefully, pls guide me. Pls share your experience with me.
 

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allisa -

Don't take your advice from me, as I've never hunted wild hogs before. I would think, however, that a .204 would be too light a gun for pigs. They have thick skin and heavy bones, and can be potentially quite dangerous if you get too close to them. If I were looking for a new rifle with fairly light recoil for pigs, I would choose the .243. Ammo is cheap for them, you can get them in nearly any type of rifle, and they can kill larger game as well if necessary.

Just my two bits. but as I say, don't only take it from me!
 

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The 204 might be a little light for hogs but it will get the job done. I have killed 10 or 12 with the 204 but you have to earhole them. I do not think that shooting them in the heart or lungs will work effectively all the time. Most of the bullets that you get for the 204 are for varmints and they are bullets that fragment on impact. But for hogs you want a bullet that will get some penetration and I dont think that you will get that consistently.


nimrod do you hunt pigs with dogs?
 

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allisa -

Don't take your advice from me, as I've never hunted wild hogs before. I would think, however, that a .204 would be too light a gun for pigs. They have thick skin and heavy bones, and can be potentially quite dangerous if you get too close to them. If I were looking for a new rifle with fairly light recoil for pigs, I would choose the .243. Ammo is cheap for them, you can get them in nearly any type of rifle, and they can kill larger game as well if necessary.

Just my two bits. but as I say, don't only take it from me!
Thanks for this advice I will keep it in my mind.
 

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NIMROD, are you taking the scalps? it may be worthwhile to salt and dry them for when your council puts a bounty on them. we,ve had up to $40 ea here and too bad if it has collar marks on it. do you howl them up? hit them hard and offen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Got a few to reply to here. I've shot quite a few pigs with the .204, shooting at unsuspecting hogs at a fair range from a solid rest in the vehicle. You have to hit them perfectly. I use 40gn bullets on everything. I've shot two while hunting on foot, after jumping a mob from the vehicle. For shoulder shots, you won't get enough penetration with the 40gn .20 cal pills.

For shooting pigs, the .204 will work if you're a competent marksman and can wait for a perfect shot. For hunting them on foot, especially in a forest, I wouldn't recommend it at all. A .223 with a 60gn or heavier bullet would work better if you must use a light calibre.

I don't dog pigs as such, but I do have a couple of hounds that I sometimes take with me. Mostly I prefer to shoot them though. Scalps in my opinion aren't worth the effort here, as the local council will only pay $10 bounty. Further west they fetch $100, be great to "export" a few to the next shire!
 

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I just got in from a great stand, only about 1/2 mile walk from the yard here. It's about -10 C here, nice and calm. It's close distance calling today, the sound doesn't move like it does on a nice crisp day. I sat down on the edge of the field in front of a small slough bottom surrounded by brush. I could see about 40 yards to the south, 100 yards or so to the north, and in front of me to the west about 400 yards. Had my .223 Rem with 55 gr. Winchester Ballistic Silvertips. Ground cover is about 18" tall wheat, so it made finding the dogs kind of fun. For the most part I only got to see slightly darker patches in the grass.

I sat down, and started to call immediately, being that the big bush started about 250 yards out. Within 2 or maybe 3 seconds of first blowing on the call, I caught some movement to the north (upwind, I might add). There, about 25 yards away was a large pup from this spring, staring at me. I was using a fawn in distress call, and was dressed in light brown coveralls...this is the only explanation I can provide for the behaviour of the dogs. As I got my gun around to my hard right, the pup actually charged me. I popped it at about 10 yards, DRT.

I whimpered a couple times on the call, and then went right back in to fawn in distress. Maybe 40 seconds passed, and another dog from the south came. Larger female. Saw her at about 60 yards in the wheat, and couldn't find her inthe scope until she got to about 30 yards. Then SHE charged me. Shot her at about 22 yards, she took off and ran into the big bush. Found her about 20 yards into the bush, jumped into a willow thicket.

I did some yips, and then into an older male challenge. about 15-20 minutes later, I got a nice male comming in. Saw him skirting around the edge of the bush, I figured it at about 400 yards. Put the cross hairs about 2 dog's heights above the kill zone , set the trigger, and let one fly. Shot over it's back. Whoops. He had no idea what had happened, and stopped to try to figure things out. This time I went one dog's height above his kill zone. DRT. Paced it out at about 380 yards, but with several small undulations. Figured it was actually about 350 yards.

Went immediately into the loudest jackrabbit in distress I could muster, and what should pop out of the bush just in front of the old male (and slightly in a divot)...his mate. Held on the male and squeezed, and the female went down. Then she got up and ran into the bush.

Another half hour of calling, and nothing else came out. Went down and found the second female about 250 yards in the bush, lots of blood everywhere. Brought her and the male up, then went and found the first female, brought her up...the first two had tidy little entrance holes (the little guy had a nice pinhole for the exit, and the female had about a silver dollar sized exit hole). The other two .223 sized entrance holes, no exits.

First time I ever got to actually shoot four dogs in one stand! Early in the winter, I managed to shoot triplets. All came in in a row, dropped one after another. None of them seemed bothered by their flipping and convulsing siblings. All nice blonde coyotes.
 
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