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Affordability.

Today鈥檚 dirt cheap .22s may allow families of meager means to buy them
. This is a very good thing for the health of today鈥檚 shooting and hunting pass-times.
Very true, and "cheap" does not necessarily go with being "shoddy". I'd also love to see more families get into the shooting sports, even if it means they need to start with an "entry level" .22 rifle.
 

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My first rifle was the cheapest new one I could buy from a shop.
I still use it , a 22wmr Stirling.
For the life of me I could not figure out what to get so I got that.
Often I think of a chambering that would of been a better choice but if I didn鈥檛 get a rifle I would not No.
You have to start some were and a entry level rifle is a hard way to beat.
Truth be told the thing that I found hardest about buying a rifle was trying to buy one that did everything I wanted it to do cheaply and that is what I would change if I went back.
Not the cheep bit the everything bit.
Nowadays if someone is trying tI decide what there first rifle should be I say buy a cheap 22 and shoot it until you figure it out.
Then I add 鈥 I bet you don鈥檛 sell the 22.

sometimes I wonder if that annoys them as much as it did when I got told that.

cheers.
 

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Thompson Center T/CR22 is another.
Don't know of any other modern design .22 rifle, other than this one, whereby they sorta admit that the Ruger rotary magazine is acceptable to use in this Winchester. That alone should boost sales of Ruger rotary magazines. :p

Don't forget Marlin.
American Rim Fire" version, but It's not as accurate as their Model 77/22 series rifles. CZ still offers their Model 452 and a few other .22 LR's which are offered with far less plastic and have very nice wood stocks. It's too bad that American manufactures have cheapened their .22 LR offers to where their parts are almost all plastic, and barrels not the greatest in terms of accuracy.

LOL 馃ぃ馃ぃ
I've got hammers with better finishes than any of these new breed of rifles

100% Agree!
Affordability.

Today鈥檚 dirt cheap .22s may allow families of meager means to buy them. This is a very good thing for the health of today鈥檚 shooting and hunting pass-times.
And yet...without entry level rifles, some people couldn'taffort to enter the sport...and we need all the new shooters we can get.
 

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I have always been a wood and steel guy, I sure didn't like the M16 I was handed in the Army.
But for some reason I've always liked the Nylon 66. I always seemed to hit what I was aiming at with the one I had in high school. Now my eyes aren't as good and my current Nylon has a Williams peep. With a smaller aperture peep I can still do good with irons.

As someone else mentioned Browning still makes nice wood and steel rifles. I have a BL-22 and a pair of Belgian SA-22s

I tried a couple of T-Bolts but they didn't shoot as well as the Ruger 77/22 and the CZs I've had.
Some of the modern offerings from Ruger, Savage, etc. are up near the $500 mark, for that much money I'd rather look for an vintage Winchester or Remington that were made when quality was still the norm.
I got this Winchester 75 Sporting (Sporter) for $500 as it had been tapped for top mount scope bases.
Didn't bother me as I'm not a collector, and I was planning on scoping it anyway.


This Winchester is a heck of a lot of rifle for the $500 I paid. The only other rifle in that price range I'd consider is a CZ, like this one:

For an entry level, kids .22, the CZ Scout is great. Nothing cheap or flimsy about it, except for the cheaper wood used.
Same great action, trigger and (shorter) barrel as used on the full sized CZ's.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
I've never owned a Nylon 66 or any of the variant's but I think there kinda cool because they were so far ahead of their time in concept, yes they had issues but Remington was definitely blazing trails with that gun. 10 years ago I was thinking about getting into collecting all the colors and variants, got to looking at how many there were and realized I'd have to figure in the cost of a new safe as well! There were levers and bolt actions as well as the semi-auto guns in 3-4 colors.
 

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I have always been a wood and steel guy, I sure didn't like the M16 I was handed in the Army.
But for some reason I've always liked the Nylon 66. I always seemed to hit what I was aiming at with the one I had in high school. Now my eyes aren't as good and my current Nylon has a Williams peep. With a smaller aperture peep I can still do good with irons.

As someone else mentioned Browning still makes nice wood and steel rifles. I have a BL-22 and a pair of Belgian SA-22s

I tried a couple of T-Bolts but they didn't shoot as well as the Ruger 77/22 and the CZs I've had.
Some of the modern offerings from Ruger, Savage, etc. are up near the $500 mark, for that much money I'd rather look for an vintage Winchester or Remington that were made when quality was still the norm.
I got this Winchester 75 Sporting (Sporter) for $500 as it had been tapped for top mount scope bases.
Didn't bother me as I'm not a collector, and I was planning on scoping it anyway.


This Winchester is a heck of a lot of rifle for the $500 I paid. The only other rifle in that price range I'd consider is a CZ, like this one:

For an entry level, kids .22, the CZ Scout is great. Nothing cheap or flimsy about it, except for the cheaper wood used.
Same great action, trigger and (shorter) barrel as used on the full sized CZ's.
OMG! Nice staff, pal
 

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I've never owned a Nylon 66 or any of the variant's but I think there kinda cool because they were so far ahead of their time in concept, yes they had issues but Remington was definitely blazing trails with that gun. 10 years ago I was thinking about getting into collecting all the colors and variants, got to looking at how many there were and realized I'd have to figure in the cost of a new safe as well! There were levers and bolt actions as well as the semi-auto guns in 3-4 colors.
as teens my rabbit hunting buddy seldom needed more than one shot but graduated from a Savage .22/.410 over under to a Nylon 66. He loved his Nylon, especially the butt stock tube feature. I hosed scampering bunnies down with my Win. model 77 and a Weaver K-1.
 

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I had the Sears Roebuck Nylon 66 in green for a while. Not as accurate as I wanted, but of technological interest anyway. Always wondered why more firearms weren't created using the natural lubricity of Remington's "nylon."
 

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The big advantage I see for the Ruger is you can buy a bone stock one new or better yet used and customize it as your budget allows, this new gun doesn't look like that could be done if and when the parts were available.
Well, for a gun with so many problems, there sure are a lot of them around.

I have one myself, with an aftermarket trigger, in a Hogue stock, topped with a Leupold 2X-7X rimfire. Shoots fine, and is very reliable. This past fall, I built a 10/22'ish rifle, with a Pike Receiver and trigger housing, Power Custom trigger parts, a very nice Brownell nitrided bolt assembly, and a Green Mountain fluted 16" .920 barrel. Topped with a Leupold 3X-9X AO Compact in Burris Zees, housed in a Hogue stock, it shoots fantastic with several types of quality ammo. Cost, about as much as five OEM 10/22's, and about half as much as I could have spent. As much fun to shoot as it was putting it together (without a single Ruger part).

I like 10/22's, the whole family has one of their own.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
I would guess that most 10-22's aren't modified much, people buy them and shoot them. I believe most 10-22's that are modified are for esthetic reasons regardless of what those same people say, they want to make the gun look cool. For the most part alterations have little effect on the 10-22's function in practice. Bottom line is people have fun modifying them, if they believe it improves there function it probably makes them perform better with the gun.
Not to say that if you replace all the key components of a 10-22 they won't function better but are they really a 10-22 at that point? Methinks not.
It's hard to argue with the success of the 10-22 but to spend a boatload of money altering/improving one has never made finacial sense to me, save your money and buy a gun that will hold/increase in value to start with. Personally I would limit modifications to 50% of the initial cost of the gun. But hey, it's america and were still free to spend our money on what we want for now anyway.
 

The Shadow (Moderator)
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All the 10/22's I have were at best, plinking guns when new. A barrel replacement takes them to a serious squirrel killing machine.

If someone wants to look at guns in the safe and hope their ship comes in, as it relates to value, that's fine. I don't buy guns because some schmoe might pay me for it later in life, I buy guns to shoot and enjoy.

Different strokes
 

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For many years, due to a plethora of sage rats (Belding ground squirrels) in a friend's pastures, we shot, literally, hundreds of them per day. We used various .22 bolt rifles, 22 Hornet and .17 HMR rifles, but mostly, the three of us used Ruger 10/22s. As a gun loony, I couldn't leave well enough alone, so after a few years, I put Volquartson trigger and hammer kit in mine. Even though the trigger is sweet and the lock time is imperceptibly better, I must admit I haven't killed any more critters than my buddies. No, we haven't tried them at target ranges. But after thousands of shots (each), they still shoot minute of sage rat. That counts for something, I would think.

that's why I don't understand why a 10/22 isn't in every household.
 

The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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I've killed a few squirrels with mine ;)

Largely unmodified, but.... my Marlin 39A will shoot rings around it, as will an old Remington 511, and my CZ embarrasses both of them. And I've had $50 surplus Romanian trainer .22 shoot better, too.

But the 10/22 sure is a handy size and fun.
 
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